Limits...
Sea level: measuring the bounding surfaces of the ocean.

Tamisiea ME, Hughes CW, Williams SD, Bingley RM - Philos Trans A Math Phys Eng Sci (2014)

Bottom Line: The practical need to understand sea level along the coasts, such as for safe navigation given the spatially variable tides, has resulted in tide gauge observations having the distinction of being some of the longest instrumental ocean records.Archives of these records, along with geological constraints, have allowed us to identify the century-scale rise in global sea level.Additional data sources, particularly satellite altimetry missions, have helped us to better identify the rates and causes of sea-level rise and the mechanisms leading to spatial variability in the observed rates.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: National Oceanography Centre, Joseph Proudman Building, 6 Brownlow Street, Liverpool L3 5DA, UK mtam@noc.ac.uk.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Three reconstructions [49–51] of sea-level rise during the twentieth century derived from tide gauge data. Each reconstruction uses different methods to combine the tide gauge data, as well as different selection criteria for choosing which records are used. The mean over the period 1960–1989 (30 years) was removed from each time series, as there can be an arbitrary offset in the reconstructions.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4150292&req=5

RSTA20130336F4: Three reconstructions [49–51] of sea-level rise during the twentieth century derived from tide gauge data. Each reconstruction uses different methods to combine the tide gauge data, as well as different selection criteria for choosing which records are used. The mean over the period 1960–1989 (30 years) was removed from each time series, as there can be an arbitrary offset in the reconstructions.

Mentions: (a,b) Fingerprint of relative sea-level change caused by a mass loss scenario equivalent to 1 mm per year of globally averaged sea-level rise from (a) Greenland and (b) West Antarctica. The 1 mm per year contour is marked with a black line in these panels and in the colour bar. These results assume that mass loss occurs rapidly compared with the time over which the mantle would flow. Under this assumption, these maps can be scaled by the actual contributions from each region. (From fig. 4a,b in [33]. Copyright © 2011 The Oceanography Society, Inc.). (c–f) An example GIA model predication of change in (c) relative sea level (tide gauges), (d) geocentric sea level (altimetry), (e) geoid change (GRACE) and (f) crustal motion (GNSS) [34]. These results use a modified version [34] of the ICE-5G ice model and VM2 Earth model [35].


Sea level: measuring the bounding surfaces of the ocean.

Tamisiea ME, Hughes CW, Williams SD, Bingley RM - Philos Trans A Math Phys Eng Sci (2014)

Three reconstructions [49–51] of sea-level rise during the twentieth century derived from tide gauge data. Each reconstruction uses different methods to combine the tide gauge data, as well as different selection criteria for choosing which records are used. The mean over the period 1960–1989 (30 years) was removed from each time series, as there can be an arbitrary offset in the reconstructions.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4150292&req=5

RSTA20130336F4: Three reconstructions [49–51] of sea-level rise during the twentieth century derived from tide gauge data. Each reconstruction uses different methods to combine the tide gauge data, as well as different selection criteria for choosing which records are used. The mean over the period 1960–1989 (30 years) was removed from each time series, as there can be an arbitrary offset in the reconstructions.
Mentions: (a,b) Fingerprint of relative sea-level change caused by a mass loss scenario equivalent to 1 mm per year of globally averaged sea-level rise from (a) Greenland and (b) West Antarctica. The 1 mm per year contour is marked with a black line in these panels and in the colour bar. These results assume that mass loss occurs rapidly compared with the time over which the mantle would flow. Under this assumption, these maps can be scaled by the actual contributions from each region. (From fig. 4a,b in [33]. Copyright © 2011 The Oceanography Society, Inc.). (c–f) An example GIA model predication of change in (c) relative sea level (tide gauges), (d) geocentric sea level (altimetry), (e) geoid change (GRACE) and (f) crustal motion (GNSS) [34]. These results use a modified version [34] of the ICE-5G ice model and VM2 Earth model [35].

Bottom Line: The practical need to understand sea level along the coasts, such as for safe navigation given the spatially variable tides, has resulted in tide gauge observations having the distinction of being some of the longest instrumental ocean records.Archives of these records, along with geological constraints, have allowed us to identify the century-scale rise in global sea level.Additional data sources, particularly satellite altimetry missions, have helped us to better identify the rates and causes of sea-level rise and the mechanisms leading to spatial variability in the observed rates.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: National Oceanography Centre, Joseph Proudman Building, 6 Brownlow Street, Liverpool L3 5DA, UK mtam@noc.ac.uk.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus