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Emergence of human babesiosis along the border of China with Myanmar: detection by PCR and confirmation by sequencing.

Zhou X, Li SG, Wang JZ, Huang JL, Zhou HJ, Chen JH, Zhou XN - Emerg Microbes Infect (2014)

Bottom Line: The blood smears showed intraerythrocytic ring form and tetrads typical of small B. microti.In both cases, the rapid diagnostic test (RDT) ruled out the possibility of co-infections with malaria.Neither case was initially diagnosed because of the low Babesia parasitemia.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Parasitology, Medical College of Soochow University , Suzhou 215123, Jiangsu province, China ; National Institute of Parasitic Diseases, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention , Shanghai 200025, China ; Key Laboratory of Parasite & Vector Biology, Ministry of Health, WHO Collaborating Centre for Malaria, Schistosomiasis and Filariasis , Shanghai 200025, China.

ABSTRACT
Babesiosis is a tick-borne, zoonotic disease caused by Babesia spp. Two cases of babesiosis were detected by nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in Yunnan province, China, and further confirmed by molecular assay. The blood smears showed intraerythrocytic ring form and tetrads typical of small B. microti. In both cases, the rapid diagnostic test (RDT) ruled out the possibility of co-infections with malaria. Neither case was initially diagnosed because of the low Babesia parasitemia. These two cases of babesiosis in areas along the Myanmar-China border pose the question of the emergence of this under recognized infection in countries or areas where malaria is endemic.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Microscopic evidence of babesiosis in a patient from the China–Myanmar border area. Giemsa stained thick blood smears (A) and thin blood smears (B and C) obtained on the first day of hospitalization for patient show an intraerythrocytic trophozoite (thin arrow). The lacking of hemozoin deposits distinguishes Babesia spp. from Plasmodium spp. The tetrad (thick arrow) is pathognomonic of small Babesia spp. Original magnification, ×1000.
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fig1: Microscopic evidence of babesiosis in a patient from the China–Myanmar border area. Giemsa stained thick blood smears (A) and thin blood smears (B and C) obtained on the first day of hospitalization for patient show an intraerythrocytic trophozoite (thin arrow). The lacking of hemozoin deposits distinguishes Babesia spp. from Plasmodium spp. The tetrad (thick arrow) is pathognomonic of small Babesia spp. Original magnification, ×1000.

Mentions: A nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with two sets of Babesia microti specific primers for the small subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU rRNA) was conducted on blood samples.1,2 Positive samples were tested using another set of nested PCR primers to detect the beta-tubulin gene of B. microti.3 To identify the clades to which the isolates belong, a more accurate analysis of the sequence encoding the 18S rRNA gene of the Babesia parasite from the patients was applied with the nested PCR primers Piro1F/rRNA-3′ and BablA/Prio6R as described by Medlin et al.4 Second round PCR products that were full-length cDNAs for the 18S rRNA gene (∼1700 bp) and the beta-tubulin gene (∼590 bp) were sequenced. The sequences were entered in the BLAST database (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/blast/Blast.cgi). The blood smears showed intraerythrocytic ring form and tetrad typical of small Babesia parasites (Figure 1).


Emergence of human babesiosis along the border of China with Myanmar: detection by PCR and confirmation by sequencing.

Zhou X, Li SG, Wang JZ, Huang JL, Zhou HJ, Chen JH, Zhou XN - Emerg Microbes Infect (2014)

Microscopic evidence of babesiosis in a patient from the China–Myanmar border area. Giemsa stained thick blood smears (A) and thin blood smears (B and C) obtained on the first day of hospitalization for patient show an intraerythrocytic trophozoite (thin arrow). The lacking of hemozoin deposits distinguishes Babesia spp. from Plasmodium spp. The tetrad (thick arrow) is pathognomonic of small Babesia spp. Original magnification, ×1000.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4150284&req=5

fig1: Microscopic evidence of babesiosis in a patient from the China–Myanmar border area. Giemsa stained thick blood smears (A) and thin blood smears (B and C) obtained on the first day of hospitalization for patient show an intraerythrocytic trophozoite (thin arrow). The lacking of hemozoin deposits distinguishes Babesia spp. from Plasmodium spp. The tetrad (thick arrow) is pathognomonic of small Babesia spp. Original magnification, ×1000.
Mentions: A nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with two sets of Babesia microti specific primers for the small subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU rRNA) was conducted on blood samples.1,2 Positive samples were tested using another set of nested PCR primers to detect the beta-tubulin gene of B. microti.3 To identify the clades to which the isolates belong, a more accurate analysis of the sequence encoding the 18S rRNA gene of the Babesia parasite from the patients was applied with the nested PCR primers Piro1F/rRNA-3′ and BablA/Prio6R as described by Medlin et al.4 Second round PCR products that were full-length cDNAs for the 18S rRNA gene (∼1700 bp) and the beta-tubulin gene (∼590 bp) were sequenced. The sequences were entered in the BLAST database (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/blast/Blast.cgi). The blood smears showed intraerythrocytic ring form and tetrad typical of small Babesia parasites (Figure 1).

Bottom Line: The blood smears showed intraerythrocytic ring form and tetrads typical of small B. microti.In both cases, the rapid diagnostic test (RDT) ruled out the possibility of co-infections with malaria.Neither case was initially diagnosed because of the low Babesia parasitemia.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Parasitology, Medical College of Soochow University , Suzhou 215123, Jiangsu province, China ; National Institute of Parasitic Diseases, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention , Shanghai 200025, China ; Key Laboratory of Parasite & Vector Biology, Ministry of Health, WHO Collaborating Centre for Malaria, Schistosomiasis and Filariasis , Shanghai 200025, China.

ABSTRACT
Babesiosis is a tick-borne, zoonotic disease caused by Babesia spp. Two cases of babesiosis were detected by nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in Yunnan province, China, and further confirmed by molecular assay. The blood smears showed intraerythrocytic ring form and tetrads typical of small B. microti. In both cases, the rapid diagnostic test (RDT) ruled out the possibility of co-infections with malaria. Neither case was initially diagnosed because of the low Babesia parasitemia. These two cases of babesiosis in areas along the Myanmar-China border pose the question of the emergence of this under recognized infection in countries or areas where malaria is endemic.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus