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Investigation on antibacterial and antioxidant activities, phenolic and flavonoid contents of some thai edible plants as an alternative for antibiotics.

Lee JH, Cho S, Paik HD, Choi CW, Nam KT, Hwang SG, Kim SK - Asian-australas. J. Anim. Sci. (2014)

Bottom Line: Antioxidative activity was determined by 2-diphenyl-2-picryl hydrazyl photometric assay.Total contents of phenolics and flavonoids were measured from the plant extracts.T was 22.5 μg/mL and the highest among plant extracts tested.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Food Science and Biotechnology of Animal Resources, Konkuk University, Seoul 143-701, Korea .

ABSTRACT
This study was aimed to examine the antibacterial and antioxidative properties of seven edible plants from Thailand to develop alternative antibiotics as feed additives. The plants include Citrus aurantifolia Swingle (Lime) fruits and its leaves, Sesbania grandiflora L. (Agati sesbania) leaves, Piper sarmentosum Roxb (Wild betal) leaves, Curcuma domestica Valeton (Turmeric) roots, Morinda citrifolia L. (Beach mulberry) leaves, Cassia siamea britt (Siamea cassia) leaves, and Cocos nucifera L. (Coconut) peels. The plants were extracted by methanol, n-hexane, chloroform, ethyl acetate, butanol and water. Antibacterial activities with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) were determined by agar diffusion assay against Escherichia coli, Burkholderia sp., Haemopilus somnus, Haemopilus parasuis, and Clostridium perfringens that were considered pathogenic strains in livestock infection. Methanol extracts of C. aurantifolia Swingle fruits and leaves showed the broadest spectrum of antibacterial activities except for C. perfringens. Butanol extract of S. grandiflora L. leaves showed the strongest activity against Burkholderia sp. with MIC, 135 μg/mL. P. sarmentosum Roxb leaves showed antibacterial activities against E. coli, Burkholderia sp. and H. parasuis. Ethyl acetate and water extracts from C. domesitca Valeton roots showed MIC of 306 μg/mL and 183 μg/mL, respectively against only C. perfringens. Antioxidative activity was determined by 2-diphenyl-2-picryl hydrazyl photometric assay. The methanol extracts of C. aurantifolia Swingle fruits and P. sarmentosum Roxb leaves showed the highest antioxidant activity among all the extracts with 3.46 mg/mL and 2.70 mg/mL effective concentration 50% (EC50) values, respectively. Total contents of phenolics and flavonoids were measured from the plant extracts. Methanol extracts of S. grandiflora L. and chloroform extracts of C. domestica Valeton were found to have the highest amount of total phenolics, 41.7 and 47.8 μg/mL, respectively. Flavonoid content of methanol extracts in S. grandiflora L. T was 22.5 μg/mL and the highest among plant extracts tested. These results indicated that C. aurantifolia Swingle, S. grandiflora L., P. sarmentosum Roxb, and C. domestica Valeton have antibacterial and antioxidant activities and can be used as alternative antibiotics or potential feed additives for the control of animal pathogenic bacteria.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Schematic diagram of plant extract preparation with various solvents.
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f1-ajas-27-10-1461: Schematic diagram of plant extract preparation with various solvents.

Mentions: The plants studied were C. aurantifolia Swingle (Lime) fruits and leaves, M. citrifolia (Beach mulberry) leaves, S. grandiflora L. (Agasti sesbania) leaves, P. sarmentosum (Wild betel) leaves, C. domestica Valeton (Turmeric) roots, C. siamea leaves, and C. nucifera L. (Coconut) peels. The plants were cut into smaller species and air-dried in the shade for a week and finely ground. The materials were supplied by K.-C Shin (Bangkok, Thailand) and authenticated by Chang-Won Choi (Department of Biology and Medicinal Science, Paichai University, South Korea). Voucher specimens were deposited at Animal Resources and Research Center, Konkuk University. A sample of 3 g was suspended in 27 mL of methanol and the mixture was agitated in 150 rpm for 6 h. The extract was filtered and evaporated. The remained extract was resuspended with 2 mL of methanol. Methanol extract (25 μL) was used for antibacterial activity. One mL of methanol extract was mixed with 5 mL of distilled water and 5 mL of n-hexane. The mixture was vigorously mixed and then phase separation was developed by standing. Upper phase of n-hexane layer was evaporated and further solvents extractions were done as same manner of previous step. Used solvents were chloroform, ethyl acetate, and butanol, subsequently as described in Figure 1. All of prepared extracts was stored at 4°C until assay was performed. Dry matter content was analyzed by estimation of weight loss during heat dry.


Investigation on antibacterial and antioxidant activities, phenolic and flavonoid contents of some thai edible plants as an alternative for antibiotics.

Lee JH, Cho S, Paik HD, Choi CW, Nam KT, Hwang SG, Kim SK - Asian-australas. J. Anim. Sci. (2014)

Schematic diagram of plant extract preparation with various solvents.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4150179&req=5

f1-ajas-27-10-1461: Schematic diagram of plant extract preparation with various solvents.
Mentions: The plants studied were C. aurantifolia Swingle (Lime) fruits and leaves, M. citrifolia (Beach mulberry) leaves, S. grandiflora L. (Agasti sesbania) leaves, P. sarmentosum (Wild betel) leaves, C. domestica Valeton (Turmeric) roots, C. siamea leaves, and C. nucifera L. (Coconut) peels. The plants were cut into smaller species and air-dried in the shade for a week and finely ground. The materials were supplied by K.-C Shin (Bangkok, Thailand) and authenticated by Chang-Won Choi (Department of Biology and Medicinal Science, Paichai University, South Korea). Voucher specimens were deposited at Animal Resources and Research Center, Konkuk University. A sample of 3 g was suspended in 27 mL of methanol and the mixture was agitated in 150 rpm for 6 h. The extract was filtered and evaporated. The remained extract was resuspended with 2 mL of methanol. Methanol extract (25 μL) was used for antibacterial activity. One mL of methanol extract was mixed with 5 mL of distilled water and 5 mL of n-hexane. The mixture was vigorously mixed and then phase separation was developed by standing. Upper phase of n-hexane layer was evaporated and further solvents extractions were done as same manner of previous step. Used solvents were chloroform, ethyl acetate, and butanol, subsequently as described in Figure 1. All of prepared extracts was stored at 4°C until assay was performed. Dry matter content was analyzed by estimation of weight loss during heat dry.

Bottom Line: Antioxidative activity was determined by 2-diphenyl-2-picryl hydrazyl photometric assay.Total contents of phenolics and flavonoids were measured from the plant extracts.T was 22.5 μg/mL and the highest among plant extracts tested.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Food Science and Biotechnology of Animal Resources, Konkuk University, Seoul 143-701, Korea .

ABSTRACT
This study was aimed to examine the antibacterial and antioxidative properties of seven edible plants from Thailand to develop alternative antibiotics as feed additives. The plants include Citrus aurantifolia Swingle (Lime) fruits and its leaves, Sesbania grandiflora L. (Agati sesbania) leaves, Piper sarmentosum Roxb (Wild betal) leaves, Curcuma domestica Valeton (Turmeric) roots, Morinda citrifolia L. (Beach mulberry) leaves, Cassia siamea britt (Siamea cassia) leaves, and Cocos nucifera L. (Coconut) peels. The plants were extracted by methanol, n-hexane, chloroform, ethyl acetate, butanol and water. Antibacterial activities with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) were determined by agar diffusion assay against Escherichia coli, Burkholderia sp., Haemopilus somnus, Haemopilus parasuis, and Clostridium perfringens that were considered pathogenic strains in livestock infection. Methanol extracts of C. aurantifolia Swingle fruits and leaves showed the broadest spectrum of antibacterial activities except for C. perfringens. Butanol extract of S. grandiflora L. leaves showed the strongest activity against Burkholderia sp. with MIC, 135 μg/mL. P. sarmentosum Roxb leaves showed antibacterial activities against E. coli, Burkholderia sp. and H. parasuis. Ethyl acetate and water extracts from C. domesitca Valeton roots showed MIC of 306 μg/mL and 183 μg/mL, respectively against only C. perfringens. Antioxidative activity was determined by 2-diphenyl-2-picryl hydrazyl photometric assay. The methanol extracts of C. aurantifolia Swingle fruits and P. sarmentosum Roxb leaves showed the highest antioxidant activity among all the extracts with 3.46 mg/mL and 2.70 mg/mL effective concentration 50% (EC50) values, respectively. Total contents of phenolics and flavonoids were measured from the plant extracts. Methanol extracts of S. grandiflora L. and chloroform extracts of C. domestica Valeton were found to have the highest amount of total phenolics, 41.7 and 47.8 μg/mL, respectively. Flavonoid content of methanol extracts in S. grandiflora L. T was 22.5 μg/mL and the highest among plant extracts tested. These results indicated that C. aurantifolia Swingle, S. grandiflora L., P. sarmentosum Roxb, and C. domestica Valeton have antibacterial and antioxidant activities and can be used as alternative antibiotics or potential feed additives for the control of animal pathogenic bacteria.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus