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Genetic diversity and relationships of korean chicken breeds based on 30 microsatellite markers.

Suh S, Sharma A, Lee S, Cho CY, Kim JH, Choi SB, Kim H, Seong HH, Yeon SH, Kim DH, Ko YG - Asian-australas. J. Anim. Sci. (2014)

Bottom Line: The effective management of endangered animal genetic resources is one of the most important concerns of modern breeding.This study aimed to analyze the genetic diversity and population structure of six Korean native chicken breeds (n = 300), which were compared with three imported breeds in Korea (n = 150).This study may provide the background for future studies to identify the genetic uniqueness of the Korean native chicken breeds.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Animal Genetic Resources Station, National Institute of Animal Science, RDA, Namwon 590-832, Korea.

ABSTRACT
The effective management of endangered animal genetic resources is one of the most important concerns of modern breeding. Evaluation of genetic diversity and relationship of local breeds is an important factor towards the identification of unique and valuable genetic resources. This study aimed to analyze the genetic diversity and population structure of six Korean native chicken breeds (n = 300), which were compared with three imported breeds in Korea (n = 150). For the analysis of genetic diversity, 30 microsatellite markers from FAO/ISAG recommended diversity panel or previously reported microsatellite markers were used. The number of alleles ranged from 2 to 15 per locus, with a mean of 8.13. The average observed heterozygosity within native breeds varied between 0.46 and 0.59. The overall heterozygote deficiency (F IT) in native chicken was 0.234±0.025. Over 30.7% of F IT was contributed by within-population deficiency (F IS). Bayesian clustering analysis, using the STRUCTURE software suggested 9 clusters. This study may provide the background for future studies to identify the genetic uniqueness of the Korean native chicken breeds.

No MeSH data available.


Clustering assignment of the nine chicken populations obtained by STRUCTURE analysis. Each of the 450 birds is represented by a thin vertical line, which is divided into colored segments which represent the proportional contribution of the inferred K = 9 clusters. The populations are separated by thin vertical black lines. KR, Korean Reddish Brown; KY, Korean Yellowish Brown; KG, Korean Grayish Brown; KB, Korean Black; KW, Korean White; KO, Korean Ogye; WL, White Leghorn; RI, Rhode Island Red; CN, Cornish.
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f2-ajas-27-10-1399: Clustering assignment of the nine chicken populations obtained by STRUCTURE analysis. Each of the 450 birds is represented by a thin vertical line, which is divided into colored segments which represent the proportional contribution of the inferred K = 9 clusters. The populations are separated by thin vertical black lines. KR, Korean Reddish Brown; KY, Korean Yellowish Brown; KG, Korean Grayish Brown; KB, Korean Black; KW, Korean White; KO, Korean Ogye; WL, White Leghorn; RI, Rhode Island Red; CN, Cornish.

Mentions: The analysis in STRUCTURE revealed that nine breeds should be divided in nine clusters (Figure 2) based on the highest ΔK value (data was not shown) according to Evanno et al. (2005). The KR, KY, KG, KW, WL, RI, and CN were each grouped in their own cluster with an estimated membership value higher than 0.90 (Table 5). The KO did also group in the own cluster but show relatively low estimated membership value (0.738).


Genetic diversity and relationships of korean chicken breeds based on 30 microsatellite markers.

Suh S, Sharma A, Lee S, Cho CY, Kim JH, Choi SB, Kim H, Seong HH, Yeon SH, Kim DH, Ko YG - Asian-australas. J. Anim. Sci. (2014)

Clustering assignment of the nine chicken populations obtained by STRUCTURE analysis. Each of the 450 birds is represented by a thin vertical line, which is divided into colored segments which represent the proportional contribution of the inferred K = 9 clusters. The populations are separated by thin vertical black lines. KR, Korean Reddish Brown; KY, Korean Yellowish Brown; KG, Korean Grayish Brown; KB, Korean Black; KW, Korean White; KO, Korean Ogye; WL, White Leghorn; RI, Rhode Island Red; CN, Cornish.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4150171&req=5

f2-ajas-27-10-1399: Clustering assignment of the nine chicken populations obtained by STRUCTURE analysis. Each of the 450 birds is represented by a thin vertical line, which is divided into colored segments which represent the proportional contribution of the inferred K = 9 clusters. The populations are separated by thin vertical black lines. KR, Korean Reddish Brown; KY, Korean Yellowish Brown; KG, Korean Grayish Brown; KB, Korean Black; KW, Korean White; KO, Korean Ogye; WL, White Leghorn; RI, Rhode Island Red; CN, Cornish.
Mentions: The analysis in STRUCTURE revealed that nine breeds should be divided in nine clusters (Figure 2) based on the highest ΔK value (data was not shown) according to Evanno et al. (2005). The KR, KY, KG, KW, WL, RI, and CN were each grouped in their own cluster with an estimated membership value higher than 0.90 (Table 5). The KO did also group in the own cluster but show relatively low estimated membership value (0.738).

Bottom Line: The effective management of endangered animal genetic resources is one of the most important concerns of modern breeding.This study aimed to analyze the genetic diversity and population structure of six Korean native chicken breeds (n = 300), which were compared with three imported breeds in Korea (n = 150).This study may provide the background for future studies to identify the genetic uniqueness of the Korean native chicken breeds.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Animal Genetic Resources Station, National Institute of Animal Science, RDA, Namwon 590-832, Korea.

ABSTRACT
The effective management of endangered animal genetic resources is one of the most important concerns of modern breeding. Evaluation of genetic diversity and relationship of local breeds is an important factor towards the identification of unique and valuable genetic resources. This study aimed to analyze the genetic diversity and population structure of six Korean native chicken breeds (n = 300), which were compared with three imported breeds in Korea (n = 150). For the analysis of genetic diversity, 30 microsatellite markers from FAO/ISAG recommended diversity panel or previously reported microsatellite markers were used. The number of alleles ranged from 2 to 15 per locus, with a mean of 8.13. The average observed heterozygosity within native breeds varied between 0.46 and 0.59. The overall heterozygote deficiency (F IT) in native chicken was 0.234±0.025. Over 30.7% of F IT was contributed by within-population deficiency (F IS). Bayesian clustering analysis, using the STRUCTURE software suggested 9 clusters. This study may provide the background for future studies to identify the genetic uniqueness of the Korean native chicken breeds.

No MeSH data available.