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Rapid charging of thermal energy storage materials through plasmonic heating.

Wang Z, Tao P, Liu Y, Xu H, Ye Q, Hu H, Song C, Chen Z, Shang W, Deng T - Sci Rep (2014)

Bottom Line: This work reports a facile approach for rapid and efficient charging of thermal energy storage materials by the instant and intense photothermal effect of uniformly distributed plasmonic nanoparticles.Upon illumination with both green laser light and sunlight, the prepared plasmonic nanocomposites with volumetric ppm level of filler concentration demonstrated a faster heating rate, a higher heating temperature and a larger heating area than the conventional thermal diffusion based approach.With controlled dispersion, we further demonstrated that the light-to-heat conversion and thermal storage properties of the plasmonic nanocomposites can be fine-tuned by engineering the composition of the nanocomposites.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: 1] State Key Laboratory of Metal Matrix Composites, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240, P. R. China [2].

ABSTRACT
Direct collection, conversion and storage of solar radiation as thermal energy are crucial to the efficient utilization of renewable solar energy and the reduction of global carbon footprint. This work reports a facile approach for rapid and efficient charging of thermal energy storage materials by the instant and intense photothermal effect of uniformly distributed plasmonic nanoparticles. Upon illumination with both green laser light and sunlight, the prepared plasmonic nanocomposites with volumetric ppm level of filler concentration demonstrated a faster heating rate, a higher heating temperature and a larger heating area than the conventional thermal diffusion based approach. With controlled dispersion, we further demonstrated that the light-to-heat conversion and thermal storage properties of the plasmonic nanocomposites can be fine-tuned by engineering the composition of the nanocomposites.

No MeSH data available.


Comparative thermal storage properties of gel wax filled with Au NPs and Au NRs.(a) UV-Vis absorption spectra of gel wax-Au NP-1 and gel wax-Au NR-1 sample with the same nominal loading concentration. The inset images are the photographs of the prepared composites. (b) Sequential IR image of gel wax, gel wax-Au NP-1 and gel wax-Au NR-1 composite. The scale bar is 1 cm. (c) Average temperature profile during solar illumination and natural cooling. (d) Temperature at the light exit side during solar illumination and natural cooling.
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f6: Comparative thermal storage properties of gel wax filled with Au NPs and Au NRs.(a) UV-Vis absorption spectra of gel wax-Au NP-1 and gel wax-Au NR-1 sample with the same nominal loading concentration. The inset images are the photographs of the prepared composites. (b) Sequential IR image of gel wax, gel wax-Au NP-1 and gel wax-Au NR-1 composite. The scale bar is 1 cm. (c) Average temperature profile during solar illumination and natural cooling. (d) Temperature at the light exit side during solar illumination and natural cooling.

Mentions: We also prepared gel wax filled with Au NRs and studied their direct solar conversion and thermal storage properties. The as-synthesized NRs (diameter: 17 ± 2.2 nm, length: 72 ± 8.8 nm) were stabilized by hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and were able to form a pink aqueous dispersion. To be compatible with the gel wax matrix, the synthetic CTAB ligands were exchanged with a long alkyl chain thiol (dodecanethiol) that can form a strong gold sulfur bond with Au NRs and the alkyl chains can favor the dispersion of NRs within gel wax. Fig. 6a shows that with the same mass concentration both gel wax-Au NP composites and gel wax-Au NR composites are highly transparent. The UV-Vis spectra show that gel wax-Au NR composites have a small transverse plasmonic peak at ~520 nm and a large broad longitudinal plasmonic peak centered at ~850 nm. Quantitatively, the gel wax-Au NR composites have stronger absorption than the gel wax filled with spherical Au NPs. The difference in plasmonic absorption intensity could be related to the much larger extinction coefficient of the high aspect ratio Au NRs36373839. The calculation work from Coronado et al38 showed that with the same equivalent volume, the extinction coefficient of cylinder-shaped Ag NRs is several times of spherical NPs and this difference became more dramatic with larger individual particle size. Based on the fitting formula reported by Huo et al36, the extinction coefficient of oleylamine-capped Au NPs in the gel wax matrix was estimated to be ~1.21 × 108 M−1 cm−1 by inputting the diameter (10.5 nm) of our NPs. Similarly, the extinction coefficient of Au NRs in gel wax matrix was estimated to be ~5.25 × 109 M−1 cm−1 according to its dependence on aspect ratio of NRs37. At the same mass concentration, the NP/NR number ratio is ~25, if we assume the NPs are spheres with a diameter of 10.5 nm, and the NRs are cylinders capped with two hemispheres. With these parameters, we could estimate their absorbance according to the Beer-Lambert law and found that the absorption of the NR sample is ~1.75 times of the NP composite sample. This value is close to the absorption peak ratio (~1.92) of the peak maximum at ~850 nm for the gel wax-Au NR-1 sample and the peak maximum at ~520 nm for the gel wax-Au NP-1 sample.


Rapid charging of thermal energy storage materials through plasmonic heating.

Wang Z, Tao P, Liu Y, Xu H, Ye Q, Hu H, Song C, Chen Z, Shang W, Deng T - Sci Rep (2014)

Comparative thermal storage properties of gel wax filled with Au NPs and Au NRs.(a) UV-Vis absorption spectra of gel wax-Au NP-1 and gel wax-Au NR-1 sample with the same nominal loading concentration. The inset images are the photographs of the prepared composites. (b) Sequential IR image of gel wax, gel wax-Au NP-1 and gel wax-Au NR-1 composite. The scale bar is 1 cm. (c) Average temperature profile during solar illumination and natural cooling. (d) Temperature at the light exit side during solar illumination and natural cooling.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4150109&req=5

f6: Comparative thermal storage properties of gel wax filled with Au NPs and Au NRs.(a) UV-Vis absorption spectra of gel wax-Au NP-1 and gel wax-Au NR-1 sample with the same nominal loading concentration. The inset images are the photographs of the prepared composites. (b) Sequential IR image of gel wax, gel wax-Au NP-1 and gel wax-Au NR-1 composite. The scale bar is 1 cm. (c) Average temperature profile during solar illumination and natural cooling. (d) Temperature at the light exit side during solar illumination and natural cooling.
Mentions: We also prepared gel wax filled with Au NRs and studied their direct solar conversion and thermal storage properties. The as-synthesized NRs (diameter: 17 ± 2.2 nm, length: 72 ± 8.8 nm) were stabilized by hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and were able to form a pink aqueous dispersion. To be compatible with the gel wax matrix, the synthetic CTAB ligands were exchanged with a long alkyl chain thiol (dodecanethiol) that can form a strong gold sulfur bond with Au NRs and the alkyl chains can favor the dispersion of NRs within gel wax. Fig. 6a shows that with the same mass concentration both gel wax-Au NP composites and gel wax-Au NR composites are highly transparent. The UV-Vis spectra show that gel wax-Au NR composites have a small transverse plasmonic peak at ~520 nm and a large broad longitudinal plasmonic peak centered at ~850 nm. Quantitatively, the gel wax-Au NR composites have stronger absorption than the gel wax filled with spherical Au NPs. The difference in plasmonic absorption intensity could be related to the much larger extinction coefficient of the high aspect ratio Au NRs36373839. The calculation work from Coronado et al38 showed that with the same equivalent volume, the extinction coefficient of cylinder-shaped Ag NRs is several times of spherical NPs and this difference became more dramatic with larger individual particle size. Based on the fitting formula reported by Huo et al36, the extinction coefficient of oleylamine-capped Au NPs in the gel wax matrix was estimated to be ~1.21 × 108 M−1 cm−1 by inputting the diameter (10.5 nm) of our NPs. Similarly, the extinction coefficient of Au NRs in gel wax matrix was estimated to be ~5.25 × 109 M−1 cm−1 according to its dependence on aspect ratio of NRs37. At the same mass concentration, the NP/NR number ratio is ~25, if we assume the NPs are spheres with a diameter of 10.5 nm, and the NRs are cylinders capped with two hemispheres. With these parameters, we could estimate their absorbance according to the Beer-Lambert law and found that the absorption of the NR sample is ~1.75 times of the NP composite sample. This value is close to the absorption peak ratio (~1.92) of the peak maximum at ~850 nm for the gel wax-Au NR-1 sample and the peak maximum at ~520 nm for the gel wax-Au NP-1 sample.

Bottom Line: This work reports a facile approach for rapid and efficient charging of thermal energy storage materials by the instant and intense photothermal effect of uniformly distributed plasmonic nanoparticles.Upon illumination with both green laser light and sunlight, the prepared plasmonic nanocomposites with volumetric ppm level of filler concentration demonstrated a faster heating rate, a higher heating temperature and a larger heating area than the conventional thermal diffusion based approach.With controlled dispersion, we further demonstrated that the light-to-heat conversion and thermal storage properties of the plasmonic nanocomposites can be fine-tuned by engineering the composition of the nanocomposites.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: 1] State Key Laboratory of Metal Matrix Composites, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240, P. R. China [2].

ABSTRACT
Direct collection, conversion and storage of solar radiation as thermal energy are crucial to the efficient utilization of renewable solar energy and the reduction of global carbon footprint. This work reports a facile approach for rapid and efficient charging of thermal energy storage materials by the instant and intense photothermal effect of uniformly distributed plasmonic nanoparticles. Upon illumination with both green laser light and sunlight, the prepared plasmonic nanocomposites with volumetric ppm level of filler concentration demonstrated a faster heating rate, a higher heating temperature and a larger heating area than the conventional thermal diffusion based approach. With controlled dispersion, we further demonstrated that the light-to-heat conversion and thermal storage properties of the plasmonic nanocomposites can be fine-tuned by engineering the composition of the nanocomposites.

No MeSH data available.