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Rapid charging of thermal energy storage materials through plasmonic heating.

Wang Z, Tao P, Liu Y, Xu H, Ye Q, Hu H, Song C, Chen Z, Shang W, Deng T - Sci Rep (2014)

Bottom Line: This work reports a facile approach for rapid and efficient charging of thermal energy storage materials by the instant and intense photothermal effect of uniformly distributed plasmonic nanoparticles.Upon illumination with both green laser light and sunlight, the prepared plasmonic nanocomposites with volumetric ppm level of filler concentration demonstrated a faster heating rate, a higher heating temperature and a larger heating area than the conventional thermal diffusion based approach.With controlled dispersion, we further demonstrated that the light-to-heat conversion and thermal storage properties of the plasmonic nanocomposites can be fine-tuned by engineering the composition of the nanocomposites.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: 1] State Key Laboratory of Metal Matrix Composites, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240, P. R. China [2].

ABSTRACT
Direct collection, conversion and storage of solar radiation as thermal energy are crucial to the efficient utilization of renewable solar energy and the reduction of global carbon footprint. This work reports a facile approach for rapid and efficient charging of thermal energy storage materials by the instant and intense photothermal effect of uniformly distributed plasmonic nanoparticles. Upon illumination with both green laser light and sunlight, the prepared plasmonic nanocomposites with volumetric ppm level of filler concentration demonstrated a faster heating rate, a higher heating temperature and a larger heating area than the conventional thermal diffusion based approach. With controlled dispersion, we further demonstrated that the light-to-heat conversion and thermal storage properties of the plasmonic nanocomposites can be fine-tuned by engineering the composition of the nanocomposites.

No MeSH data available.


Time-sequential thermal IR images and temperature profiles of thermal storage materials under solar illumination.IR images of (a) neat gel wax; (b) gel wax-Al foil; (c) gel wax-Au NP-1; (d) gel wax-Au NP-2; (e) gel wax-Au NP-3. (f) Average temperature profile. (g) Temperature profile of thermal storage materials at the light exit side. The inset shows a typical IR image where the temperature value was analyzed as the point in the light exit side of the cuvette.
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f5: Time-sequential thermal IR images and temperature profiles of thermal storage materials under solar illumination.IR images of (a) neat gel wax; (b) gel wax-Al foil; (c) gel wax-Au NP-1; (d) gel wax-Au NP-2; (e) gel wax-Au NP-3. (f) Average temperature profile. (g) Temperature profile of thermal storage materials at the light exit side. The inset shows a typical IR image where the temperature value was analyzed as the point in the light exit side of the cuvette.

Mentions: We further demonstrate that the prepared homogeneously dispersed nanocomposites could directly convert renewable solar energy, here provided by a solar simulator (with a power density of 7.2 W/cm2), and store it as thermal energy. The IR images in Fig. 5 display that the Au NP loaded gel wax samples had a much larger and more uniform hot zone than the samples with Al foil. Different from green laser illumination, the neat gel wax sample was also heated to ~60°C under the broad spectrum sunlight radiation. The IR portion of the sunlight could be effectively absorbed by the gel wax sample leading to the temperature rise. Comparing the gel wax-Al foil sample and nanocomposite samples, the black Al foil can fully absorb the incident sunlight, thus the front portion of the gel wax was immediately heated up. Further increasing the illumination time to 30 s and 60 s, the hot zone only expanded slowly by the intrinsic slow thermal diffusion mechanism. It should be emphasized that the Au NPs are most effectively excited only near their resonant peak (~530 nm) and the plasmonic nanocomposites only absorb a small portion of the incident sunlight. However, even with such a low loading of Au NPs, they showed much better performance than the benchmark sample.


Rapid charging of thermal energy storage materials through plasmonic heating.

Wang Z, Tao P, Liu Y, Xu H, Ye Q, Hu H, Song C, Chen Z, Shang W, Deng T - Sci Rep (2014)

Time-sequential thermal IR images and temperature profiles of thermal storage materials under solar illumination.IR images of (a) neat gel wax; (b) gel wax-Al foil; (c) gel wax-Au NP-1; (d) gel wax-Au NP-2; (e) gel wax-Au NP-3. (f) Average temperature profile. (g) Temperature profile of thermal storage materials at the light exit side. The inset shows a typical IR image where the temperature value was analyzed as the point in the light exit side of the cuvette.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4150109&req=5

f5: Time-sequential thermal IR images and temperature profiles of thermal storage materials under solar illumination.IR images of (a) neat gel wax; (b) gel wax-Al foil; (c) gel wax-Au NP-1; (d) gel wax-Au NP-2; (e) gel wax-Au NP-3. (f) Average temperature profile. (g) Temperature profile of thermal storage materials at the light exit side. The inset shows a typical IR image where the temperature value was analyzed as the point in the light exit side of the cuvette.
Mentions: We further demonstrate that the prepared homogeneously dispersed nanocomposites could directly convert renewable solar energy, here provided by a solar simulator (with a power density of 7.2 W/cm2), and store it as thermal energy. The IR images in Fig. 5 display that the Au NP loaded gel wax samples had a much larger and more uniform hot zone than the samples with Al foil. Different from green laser illumination, the neat gel wax sample was also heated to ~60°C under the broad spectrum sunlight radiation. The IR portion of the sunlight could be effectively absorbed by the gel wax sample leading to the temperature rise. Comparing the gel wax-Al foil sample and nanocomposite samples, the black Al foil can fully absorb the incident sunlight, thus the front portion of the gel wax was immediately heated up. Further increasing the illumination time to 30 s and 60 s, the hot zone only expanded slowly by the intrinsic slow thermal diffusion mechanism. It should be emphasized that the Au NPs are most effectively excited only near their resonant peak (~530 nm) and the plasmonic nanocomposites only absorb a small portion of the incident sunlight. However, even with such a low loading of Au NPs, they showed much better performance than the benchmark sample.

Bottom Line: This work reports a facile approach for rapid and efficient charging of thermal energy storage materials by the instant and intense photothermal effect of uniformly distributed plasmonic nanoparticles.Upon illumination with both green laser light and sunlight, the prepared plasmonic nanocomposites with volumetric ppm level of filler concentration demonstrated a faster heating rate, a higher heating temperature and a larger heating area than the conventional thermal diffusion based approach.With controlled dispersion, we further demonstrated that the light-to-heat conversion and thermal storage properties of the plasmonic nanocomposites can be fine-tuned by engineering the composition of the nanocomposites.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: 1] State Key Laboratory of Metal Matrix Composites, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240, P. R. China [2].

ABSTRACT
Direct collection, conversion and storage of solar radiation as thermal energy are crucial to the efficient utilization of renewable solar energy and the reduction of global carbon footprint. This work reports a facile approach for rapid and efficient charging of thermal energy storage materials by the instant and intense photothermal effect of uniformly distributed plasmonic nanoparticles. Upon illumination with both green laser light and sunlight, the prepared plasmonic nanocomposites with volumetric ppm level of filler concentration demonstrated a faster heating rate, a higher heating temperature and a larger heating area than the conventional thermal diffusion based approach. With controlled dispersion, we further demonstrated that the light-to-heat conversion and thermal storage properties of the plasmonic nanocomposites can be fine-tuned by engineering the composition of the nanocomposites.

No MeSH data available.