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Rapid charging of thermal energy storage materials through plasmonic heating.

Wang Z, Tao P, Liu Y, Xu H, Ye Q, Hu H, Song C, Chen Z, Shang W, Deng T - Sci Rep (2014)

Bottom Line: This work reports a facile approach for rapid and efficient charging of thermal energy storage materials by the instant and intense photothermal effect of uniformly distributed plasmonic nanoparticles.Upon illumination with both green laser light and sunlight, the prepared plasmonic nanocomposites with volumetric ppm level of filler concentration demonstrated a faster heating rate, a higher heating temperature and a larger heating area than the conventional thermal diffusion based approach.With controlled dispersion, we further demonstrated that the light-to-heat conversion and thermal storage properties of the plasmonic nanocomposites can be fine-tuned by engineering the composition of the nanocomposites.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: 1] State Key Laboratory of Metal Matrix Composites, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240, P. R. China [2].

ABSTRACT
Direct collection, conversion and storage of solar radiation as thermal energy are crucial to the efficient utilization of renewable solar energy and the reduction of global carbon footprint. This work reports a facile approach for rapid and efficient charging of thermal energy storage materials by the instant and intense photothermal effect of uniformly distributed plasmonic nanoparticles. Upon illumination with both green laser light and sunlight, the prepared plasmonic nanocomposites with volumetric ppm level of filler concentration demonstrated a faster heating rate, a higher heating temperature and a larger heating area than the conventional thermal diffusion based approach. With controlled dispersion, we further demonstrated that the light-to-heat conversion and thermal storage properties of the plasmonic nanocomposites can be fine-tuned by engineering the composition of the nanocomposites.

No MeSH data available.


Temperature profiles of thermal storage materials under laser illumination.(a) Maximum temperature profiles during heating and natural cooling; (b) Cooling rate based on maximum temperature; (c) Average temperature profiles during heating and natural cooling; (d) Cooling rate based on average temperature.
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f4: Temperature profiles of thermal storage materials under laser illumination.(a) Maximum temperature profiles during heating and natural cooling; (b) Cooling rate based on maximum temperature; (c) Average temperature profiles during heating and natural cooling; (d) Cooling rate based on average temperature.

Mentions: The temperature distribution of the thermal storage materials as a function of time was recorded by the IR camera operating at a video mode. Fig. 4 plots the change of the maximum temperature and average temperature over the whole cross area of the sample in the laser heating and natural cooling process after switching off the laser. The neat gel wax sample showed a nearly constant room temperature profile (with a temperature fluctuation of 1–2°C) as the incident laser beam simply transmitted out. Indeed, 0.435 W of the incident laser beam (0.641 W) was detected by the power meter at the back side of the cuvette. The difference between the incident power and measured transmitted power was mainly due to the reflection and scattering loss at the cuvette interfaces. For all other samples, no transmitted light was detected. Upon loading Au NPs, Fig. 4a shows that the maximum temperature profile quickly reached a plateau. Under the same laser illumination, within ~1 min the composite samples reached 53°C, 92°C and 160°C from room temperature, respectively. The saturation temperature value increased accordingly with increasing loading concentration of Au NPs. The temperature was determined by the balance among input laser energy, heat absorption and heat dissipation rate of the whole system34. When the energy input and loss becomes equal, the maximum temperature remains unchanged in the rest of the heating process.


Rapid charging of thermal energy storage materials through plasmonic heating.

Wang Z, Tao P, Liu Y, Xu H, Ye Q, Hu H, Song C, Chen Z, Shang W, Deng T - Sci Rep (2014)

Temperature profiles of thermal storage materials under laser illumination.(a) Maximum temperature profiles during heating and natural cooling; (b) Cooling rate based on maximum temperature; (c) Average temperature profiles during heating and natural cooling; (d) Cooling rate based on average temperature.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4150109&req=5

f4: Temperature profiles of thermal storage materials under laser illumination.(a) Maximum temperature profiles during heating and natural cooling; (b) Cooling rate based on maximum temperature; (c) Average temperature profiles during heating and natural cooling; (d) Cooling rate based on average temperature.
Mentions: The temperature distribution of the thermal storage materials as a function of time was recorded by the IR camera operating at a video mode. Fig. 4 plots the change of the maximum temperature and average temperature over the whole cross area of the sample in the laser heating and natural cooling process after switching off the laser. The neat gel wax sample showed a nearly constant room temperature profile (with a temperature fluctuation of 1–2°C) as the incident laser beam simply transmitted out. Indeed, 0.435 W of the incident laser beam (0.641 W) was detected by the power meter at the back side of the cuvette. The difference between the incident power and measured transmitted power was mainly due to the reflection and scattering loss at the cuvette interfaces. For all other samples, no transmitted light was detected. Upon loading Au NPs, Fig. 4a shows that the maximum temperature profile quickly reached a plateau. Under the same laser illumination, within ~1 min the composite samples reached 53°C, 92°C and 160°C from room temperature, respectively. The saturation temperature value increased accordingly with increasing loading concentration of Au NPs. The temperature was determined by the balance among input laser energy, heat absorption and heat dissipation rate of the whole system34. When the energy input and loss becomes equal, the maximum temperature remains unchanged in the rest of the heating process.

Bottom Line: This work reports a facile approach for rapid and efficient charging of thermal energy storage materials by the instant and intense photothermal effect of uniformly distributed plasmonic nanoparticles.Upon illumination with both green laser light and sunlight, the prepared plasmonic nanocomposites with volumetric ppm level of filler concentration demonstrated a faster heating rate, a higher heating temperature and a larger heating area than the conventional thermal diffusion based approach.With controlled dispersion, we further demonstrated that the light-to-heat conversion and thermal storage properties of the plasmonic nanocomposites can be fine-tuned by engineering the composition of the nanocomposites.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: 1] State Key Laboratory of Metal Matrix Composites, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240, P. R. China [2].

ABSTRACT
Direct collection, conversion and storage of solar radiation as thermal energy are crucial to the efficient utilization of renewable solar energy and the reduction of global carbon footprint. This work reports a facile approach for rapid and efficient charging of thermal energy storage materials by the instant and intense photothermal effect of uniformly distributed plasmonic nanoparticles. Upon illumination with both green laser light and sunlight, the prepared plasmonic nanocomposites with volumetric ppm level of filler concentration demonstrated a faster heating rate, a higher heating temperature and a larger heating area than the conventional thermal diffusion based approach. With controlled dispersion, we further demonstrated that the light-to-heat conversion and thermal storage properties of the plasmonic nanocomposites can be fine-tuned by engineering the composition of the nanocomposites.

No MeSH data available.