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Rapid charging of thermal energy storage materials through plasmonic heating.

Wang Z, Tao P, Liu Y, Xu H, Ye Q, Hu H, Song C, Chen Z, Shang W, Deng T - Sci Rep (2014)

Bottom Line: This work reports a facile approach for rapid and efficient charging of thermal energy storage materials by the instant and intense photothermal effect of uniformly distributed plasmonic nanoparticles.Upon illumination with both green laser light and sunlight, the prepared plasmonic nanocomposites with volumetric ppm level of filler concentration demonstrated a faster heating rate, a higher heating temperature and a larger heating area than the conventional thermal diffusion based approach.With controlled dispersion, we further demonstrated that the light-to-heat conversion and thermal storage properties of the plasmonic nanocomposites can be fine-tuned by engineering the composition of the nanocomposites.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: 1] State Key Laboratory of Metal Matrix Composites, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240, P. R. China [2].

ABSTRACT
Direct collection, conversion and storage of solar radiation as thermal energy are crucial to the efficient utilization of renewable solar energy and the reduction of global carbon footprint. This work reports a facile approach for rapid and efficient charging of thermal energy storage materials by the instant and intense photothermal effect of uniformly distributed plasmonic nanoparticles. Upon illumination with both green laser light and sunlight, the prepared plasmonic nanocomposites with volumetric ppm level of filler concentration demonstrated a faster heating rate, a higher heating temperature and a larger heating area than the conventional thermal diffusion based approach. With controlled dispersion, we further demonstrated that the light-to-heat conversion and thermal storage properties of the plasmonic nanocomposites can be fine-tuned by engineering the composition of the nanocomposites.

No MeSH data available.


Schematic of laser illumination experimental setup and time-sequential IR images.(a) A 532-nm green laser with a power density of 36.3 W/cm2 was used to excite the plasmonic Au NPs and a thermal IR camera was used to capture the temperate change operating at a video mode. The schematic was drawn by Z. W. with Microsoft PowerPoint. Time-sequential IR images obtained from FLIR R&D software: (b) neat gel wax; (c) gel wax-Al foil; (d) gel wax-Au NP-1; (e) gel wax-Au NP-2; (f) gel wax-Au NP-3 after laser illumination of 10, 30 and 60 s. The scale bar is 1 cm.
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f3: Schematic of laser illumination experimental setup and time-sequential IR images.(a) A 532-nm green laser with a power density of 36.3 W/cm2 was used to excite the plasmonic Au NPs and a thermal IR camera was used to capture the temperate change operating at a video mode. The schematic was drawn by Z. W. with Microsoft PowerPoint. Time-sequential IR images obtained from FLIR R&D software: (b) neat gel wax; (c) gel wax-Al foil; (d) gel wax-Au NP-1; (e) gel wax-Au NP-2; (f) gel wax-Au NP-3 after laser illumination of 10, 30 and 60 s. The scale bar is 1 cm.

Mentions: We first used a green laser (~532 nm in wavelength, with a focused beam diameter of 1.5 mm) to excite the Au NPs around their plasmonic resonance wavelength. Fig. 3 shows the experimental setup and time-sequential IR images of the thermal storage materials during the heating process. A neat gel wax and a gel wax sample with black Al foil were used as the control sample and the benchmark, respectively. In the neat gel wax sample, only a weak narrow light path in the center of the cuvette was observed. There was negligible change in the sample temperature because the gel wax could not effectively absorb the green laser radiation. For the gel wax-Al foil sample, as the black Al foil was attached onto the inner side of cuvette where the laser beam entered, the hot zone gradually expanded from that side to the middle. When the illumination time was prolonged to 60 s, about 1/3 area of the gel wax was heated. By contrast, in the Au NPs loaded gel wax samples, an instant and uniform heating zone was observed. Here the heating zone was defined as the high temperature area enveloped by the red contour shown by the IR images under the same temperature scale bar. For the two low loading samples, after 10 s illumination the entire sample length coinciding with the laser path was heated up. Prolonging the illumination time to 30 s and 60 s further increased the local temperature and the hot zone became broader. This series of IR images vividly demonstrate that plasmonic heating charging process proceeds via an instant volumetric heat generation in the light absorption region followed by thermal diffusion-limited heat transfer to the remaining portion of the sample. This charging mechanism is in obvious contrast to the thermal diffusion based traditional charging method evidenced by the slow movement of the hot zone from the front (Fig. 3c). When the NP loading concentration became higher, the hot zone slowly enlarged with illumination duration (Fig. 3f). This gradual enlargement could be ascribed to the stronger absorption of the incident light and the shorter optical path at higher loading concentration. The incident light interacted with Au NPs in the front surface and produced a hot zone via plasmonic heating. At the later stage, the plasmonic NPs continuously generated heat and the produced heat is then gradually conducted to the remaining relatively cold gel wax.


Rapid charging of thermal energy storage materials through plasmonic heating.

Wang Z, Tao P, Liu Y, Xu H, Ye Q, Hu H, Song C, Chen Z, Shang W, Deng T - Sci Rep (2014)

Schematic of laser illumination experimental setup and time-sequential IR images.(a) A 532-nm green laser with a power density of 36.3 W/cm2 was used to excite the plasmonic Au NPs and a thermal IR camera was used to capture the temperate change operating at a video mode. The schematic was drawn by Z. W. with Microsoft PowerPoint. Time-sequential IR images obtained from FLIR R&D software: (b) neat gel wax; (c) gel wax-Al foil; (d) gel wax-Au NP-1; (e) gel wax-Au NP-2; (f) gel wax-Au NP-3 after laser illumination of 10, 30 and 60 s. The scale bar is 1 cm.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4150109&req=5

f3: Schematic of laser illumination experimental setup and time-sequential IR images.(a) A 532-nm green laser with a power density of 36.3 W/cm2 was used to excite the plasmonic Au NPs and a thermal IR camera was used to capture the temperate change operating at a video mode. The schematic was drawn by Z. W. with Microsoft PowerPoint. Time-sequential IR images obtained from FLIR R&D software: (b) neat gel wax; (c) gel wax-Al foil; (d) gel wax-Au NP-1; (e) gel wax-Au NP-2; (f) gel wax-Au NP-3 after laser illumination of 10, 30 and 60 s. The scale bar is 1 cm.
Mentions: We first used a green laser (~532 nm in wavelength, with a focused beam diameter of 1.5 mm) to excite the Au NPs around their plasmonic resonance wavelength. Fig. 3 shows the experimental setup and time-sequential IR images of the thermal storage materials during the heating process. A neat gel wax and a gel wax sample with black Al foil were used as the control sample and the benchmark, respectively. In the neat gel wax sample, only a weak narrow light path in the center of the cuvette was observed. There was negligible change in the sample temperature because the gel wax could not effectively absorb the green laser radiation. For the gel wax-Al foil sample, as the black Al foil was attached onto the inner side of cuvette where the laser beam entered, the hot zone gradually expanded from that side to the middle. When the illumination time was prolonged to 60 s, about 1/3 area of the gel wax was heated. By contrast, in the Au NPs loaded gel wax samples, an instant and uniform heating zone was observed. Here the heating zone was defined as the high temperature area enveloped by the red contour shown by the IR images under the same temperature scale bar. For the two low loading samples, after 10 s illumination the entire sample length coinciding with the laser path was heated up. Prolonging the illumination time to 30 s and 60 s further increased the local temperature and the hot zone became broader. This series of IR images vividly demonstrate that plasmonic heating charging process proceeds via an instant volumetric heat generation in the light absorption region followed by thermal diffusion-limited heat transfer to the remaining portion of the sample. This charging mechanism is in obvious contrast to the thermal diffusion based traditional charging method evidenced by the slow movement of the hot zone from the front (Fig. 3c). When the NP loading concentration became higher, the hot zone slowly enlarged with illumination duration (Fig. 3f). This gradual enlargement could be ascribed to the stronger absorption of the incident light and the shorter optical path at higher loading concentration. The incident light interacted with Au NPs in the front surface and produced a hot zone via plasmonic heating. At the later stage, the plasmonic NPs continuously generated heat and the produced heat is then gradually conducted to the remaining relatively cold gel wax.

Bottom Line: This work reports a facile approach for rapid and efficient charging of thermal energy storage materials by the instant and intense photothermal effect of uniformly distributed plasmonic nanoparticles.Upon illumination with both green laser light and sunlight, the prepared plasmonic nanocomposites with volumetric ppm level of filler concentration demonstrated a faster heating rate, a higher heating temperature and a larger heating area than the conventional thermal diffusion based approach.With controlled dispersion, we further demonstrated that the light-to-heat conversion and thermal storage properties of the plasmonic nanocomposites can be fine-tuned by engineering the composition of the nanocomposites.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: 1] State Key Laboratory of Metal Matrix Composites, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240, P. R. China [2].

ABSTRACT
Direct collection, conversion and storage of solar radiation as thermal energy are crucial to the efficient utilization of renewable solar energy and the reduction of global carbon footprint. This work reports a facile approach for rapid and efficient charging of thermal energy storage materials by the instant and intense photothermal effect of uniformly distributed plasmonic nanoparticles. Upon illumination with both green laser light and sunlight, the prepared plasmonic nanocomposites with volumetric ppm level of filler concentration demonstrated a faster heating rate, a higher heating temperature and a larger heating area than the conventional thermal diffusion based approach. With controlled dispersion, we further demonstrated that the light-to-heat conversion and thermal storage properties of the plasmonic nanocomposites can be fine-tuned by engineering the composition of the nanocomposites.

No MeSH data available.