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Phylogeny and taxonomy of the genus Gliocephalotrichum.

Lombard L, Serrato-Diaz LM, Cheewangkoon R, French-Monar RD, Decock C, Crous PW - Persoonia (2014)

Bottom Line: Contemporary taxonomic studies of these fungi have relied on morphology and DNA sequence comparisons of the internal transcribed spacer region of the nuclear rDNA (ITS) and the β-tubulin gene regions.As a result five species are newly described, namely G. humicola (Taiwan, soil), G. mexicanum (rambutan fruit from Mexico), G. nephelii (rambutan fruit from Guatemala), G. queenslandicum (Australia, endophytic isolations) and G. simmonsii (rambutan fruit from Guatemala).Although species of Gliocephalotrichum are generally not regarded as important plant pathogens, their ability to cause post-harvest fruit rot could have an impact on fruit export and storage.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: CBS-KNAW Fungal Biodiversity Centre, Uppsalalaan 8, 3584 CT Utrecht, The Netherlands;

ABSTRACT
Species in the genus Gliocephalotrichum (= Leuconectria) (Hypocreales, Nectriaceae) are soilborne fungi, associated with post-harvest fruit spoilage of several important tropical fruit crops. Contemporary taxonomic studies of these fungi have relied on morphology and DNA sequence comparisons of the internal transcribed spacer region of the nuclear rDNA (ITS) and the β-tubulin gene regions. Employing DNA sequence data from four loci (β-tubulin, histone H3, ITS, and translation elongation factor 1-alpha) and morphological comparisons, the taxonomic status of the genus Gliocephalotrichum was re-evaluated. As a result five species are newly described, namely G. humicola (Taiwan, soil), G. mexicanum (rambutan fruit from Mexico), G. nephelii (rambutan fruit from Guatemala), G. queenslandicum (Australia, endophytic isolations) and G. simmonsii (rambutan fruit from Guatemala). Although species of Gliocephalotrichum are generally not regarded as important plant pathogens, their ability to cause post-harvest fruit rot could have an impact on fruit export and storage.

No MeSH data available.


Gliocephalotrichum bacillisporum (CBS 126572, ex-type culture). a. Conidiophores on carnation leaf on SNA; b, c. conidiophores; d, e. penicillus; f–i. apex of stipe extensions; j. conidia; k. chlamydospores formed in chains. — Scale bars: b = 50 μm; c = 20 μm; d = 10 μm (applies to e–k).
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Figure 2: Gliocephalotrichum bacillisporum (CBS 126572, ex-type culture). a. Conidiophores on carnation leaf on SNA; b, c. conidiophores; d, e. penicillus; f–i. apex of stipe extensions; j. conidia; k. chlamydospores formed in chains. — Scale bars: b = 50 μm; c = 20 μm; d = 10 μm (applies to e–k).

Mentions: Gliocephalotrichum bacillisporum Decock & Huret, Mycologia 98: 493. — MycoBank MB501190; Fig. 2


Phylogeny and taxonomy of the genus Gliocephalotrichum.

Lombard L, Serrato-Diaz LM, Cheewangkoon R, French-Monar RD, Decock C, Crous PW - Persoonia (2014)

Gliocephalotrichum bacillisporum (CBS 126572, ex-type culture). a. Conidiophores on carnation leaf on SNA; b, c. conidiophores; d, e. penicillus; f–i. apex of stipe extensions; j. conidia; k. chlamydospores formed in chains. — Scale bars: b = 50 μm; c = 20 μm; d = 10 μm (applies to e–k).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4150073&req=5

Figure 2: Gliocephalotrichum bacillisporum (CBS 126572, ex-type culture). a. Conidiophores on carnation leaf on SNA; b, c. conidiophores; d, e. penicillus; f–i. apex of stipe extensions; j. conidia; k. chlamydospores formed in chains. — Scale bars: b = 50 μm; c = 20 μm; d = 10 μm (applies to e–k).
Mentions: Gliocephalotrichum bacillisporum Decock & Huret, Mycologia 98: 493. — MycoBank MB501190; Fig. 2

Bottom Line: Contemporary taxonomic studies of these fungi have relied on morphology and DNA sequence comparisons of the internal transcribed spacer region of the nuclear rDNA (ITS) and the β-tubulin gene regions.As a result five species are newly described, namely G. humicola (Taiwan, soil), G. mexicanum (rambutan fruit from Mexico), G. nephelii (rambutan fruit from Guatemala), G. queenslandicum (Australia, endophytic isolations) and G. simmonsii (rambutan fruit from Guatemala).Although species of Gliocephalotrichum are generally not regarded as important plant pathogens, their ability to cause post-harvest fruit rot could have an impact on fruit export and storage.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: CBS-KNAW Fungal Biodiversity Centre, Uppsalalaan 8, 3584 CT Utrecht, The Netherlands;

ABSTRACT
Species in the genus Gliocephalotrichum (= Leuconectria) (Hypocreales, Nectriaceae) are soilborne fungi, associated with post-harvest fruit spoilage of several important tropical fruit crops. Contemporary taxonomic studies of these fungi have relied on morphology and DNA sequence comparisons of the internal transcribed spacer region of the nuclear rDNA (ITS) and the β-tubulin gene regions. Employing DNA sequence data from four loci (β-tubulin, histone H3, ITS, and translation elongation factor 1-alpha) and morphological comparisons, the taxonomic status of the genus Gliocephalotrichum was re-evaluated. As a result five species are newly described, namely G. humicola (Taiwan, soil), G. mexicanum (rambutan fruit from Mexico), G. nephelii (rambutan fruit from Guatemala), G. queenslandicum (Australia, endophytic isolations) and G. simmonsii (rambutan fruit from Guatemala). Although species of Gliocephalotrichum are generally not regarded as important plant pathogens, their ability to cause post-harvest fruit rot could have an impact on fruit export and storage.

No MeSH data available.