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Micro- and Macroelemental Composition and Safety Evaluation of the Nutraceutical Moringa oleifera Leaves.

Asiedu-Gyekye IJ, Frimpong-Manso S, Awortwe C, Antwi DA, Nyarko AK - J Toxicol (2014)

Bottom Line: Results showed significant levels of thirty-five (35) elements (14 macroelements and 21 microelements) in M. oleifera extract.Although there were observed elevations in liver enzymes ALT and ALP (P < 0.001) and lower creatinine levels in the extract treated groups, no adverse histopathological findings were found.Moringa oleifera dried leaf extract may, therefore, be reasonably safe for consumption.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, College of Health Sciences, University of Ghana School of Pharmacy, P.O. Box LG 43, Legon, Ghana.

ABSTRACT
Moringa oleifera is a multipurpose plant used in Ghana and most parts of Africa. Its high mineral, protein, and vitamins content has enabled its use as a nutraceutical and panacea for various diseases. This study aimed at measuring the micro- and macroelements content of dried Moringa oleifera leaves using energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectroscopic (EDXRF) and assessing its toxicological effect in rats. Acute toxicity (5000 mg/kg) and a subacute toxicity studies of the leaf (40 mg/kg to 1000 mg/kg) extract were conducted in rats. Blood samples were assessed for biochemical and haematological parameters. Results showed significant levels of thirty-five (35) elements (14 macroelements and 21 microelements) in M. oleifera extract. There were no observed overt adverse reactions in the acute and subacute studies. Although there were observed elevations in liver enzymes ALT and ALP (P < 0.001) and lower creatinine levels in the extract treated groups, no adverse histopathological findings were found. Moringa oleifera dried leaf extract may, therefore, be reasonably safe for consumption. However, the consumption of Moringa oleifera leaves should not exceed a maximum of 70 grams per day to prevent cumulative toxicity of these essential elements over long periods.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Lipid profile of a 14-day administration of MOE in male SDRs. Values are expressed as means ± SEM (n = 7). Values of P < 0.05 were considered as statistically significant. *P < 0.05, **P < 0.01, and ***P < 0.0001 when control was compared with MOE.
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fig3: Lipid profile of a 14-day administration of MOE in male SDRs. Values are expressed as means ± SEM (n = 7). Values of P < 0.05 were considered as statistically significant. *P < 0.05, **P < 0.01, and ***P < 0.0001 when control was compared with MOE.

Mentions: Figures 2 and 3 show results for the biochemical test for liver function and lipid profiles, respectively. There were increases in the levels of liver enzymes during MOE administration in a non-dose dependent manner. AST levels, however, reduced at all dose levels except the 80 mg/kg group. There were decreases in the lipid parameters during MOE administration. For the lipid profiles, MOE administration generally led to a decrease in total cholesterol and triglycerides as well as LDL and, to some extent, HDL cholesterol.


Micro- and Macroelemental Composition and Safety Evaluation of the Nutraceutical Moringa oleifera Leaves.

Asiedu-Gyekye IJ, Frimpong-Manso S, Awortwe C, Antwi DA, Nyarko AK - J Toxicol (2014)

Lipid profile of a 14-day administration of MOE in male SDRs. Values are expressed as means ± SEM (n = 7). Values of P < 0.05 were considered as statistically significant. *P < 0.05, **P < 0.01, and ***P < 0.0001 when control was compared with MOE.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4129914&req=5

fig3: Lipid profile of a 14-day administration of MOE in male SDRs. Values are expressed as means ± SEM (n = 7). Values of P < 0.05 were considered as statistically significant. *P < 0.05, **P < 0.01, and ***P < 0.0001 when control was compared with MOE.
Mentions: Figures 2 and 3 show results for the biochemical test for liver function and lipid profiles, respectively. There were increases in the levels of liver enzymes during MOE administration in a non-dose dependent manner. AST levels, however, reduced at all dose levels except the 80 mg/kg group. There were decreases in the lipid parameters during MOE administration. For the lipid profiles, MOE administration generally led to a decrease in total cholesterol and triglycerides as well as LDL and, to some extent, HDL cholesterol.

Bottom Line: Results showed significant levels of thirty-five (35) elements (14 macroelements and 21 microelements) in M. oleifera extract.Although there were observed elevations in liver enzymes ALT and ALP (P < 0.001) and lower creatinine levels in the extract treated groups, no adverse histopathological findings were found.Moringa oleifera dried leaf extract may, therefore, be reasonably safe for consumption.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, College of Health Sciences, University of Ghana School of Pharmacy, P.O. Box LG 43, Legon, Ghana.

ABSTRACT
Moringa oleifera is a multipurpose plant used in Ghana and most parts of Africa. Its high mineral, protein, and vitamins content has enabled its use as a nutraceutical and panacea for various diseases. This study aimed at measuring the micro- and macroelements content of dried Moringa oleifera leaves using energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectroscopic (EDXRF) and assessing its toxicological effect in rats. Acute toxicity (5000 mg/kg) and a subacute toxicity studies of the leaf (40 mg/kg to 1000 mg/kg) extract were conducted in rats. Blood samples were assessed for biochemical and haematological parameters. Results showed significant levels of thirty-five (35) elements (14 macroelements and 21 microelements) in M. oleifera extract. There were no observed overt adverse reactions in the acute and subacute studies. Although there were observed elevations in liver enzymes ALT and ALP (P < 0.001) and lower creatinine levels in the extract treated groups, no adverse histopathological findings were found. Moringa oleifera dried leaf extract may, therefore, be reasonably safe for consumption. However, the consumption of Moringa oleifera leaves should not exceed a maximum of 70 grams per day to prevent cumulative toxicity of these essential elements over long periods.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus