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Miliary nodules: An unusual presentation of allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis.

Aneja P, Singh UP, Kaur B, Patel K - Lung India (2014)

Bottom Line: The common radiological abnormalities encountered are fleeting pulmonary opacities, bronchiectasis, and mucoid impaction.Uncommon radiological findings encountered in ABPA include pulmonary masses, perihilar opacities simulating hilar adenopathy, and pleural effusions.It is often misdiagnosed and mismanaged as tuberculosis; thus, the clinician should be vigilant enough to diagnose this very rare entity.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Government Medical College, Patiala, Punjab, India.

ABSTRACT
Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA) is an immune-mediated inflammatory disease caused by hypersensitivity to Aspergillus fumigatus. A wide spectrum of plain radiographic appearances has been described in ABPA, though none are pathognomonic of ABPA. The common radiological abnormalities encountered are fleeting pulmonary opacities, bronchiectasis, and mucoid impaction. Uncommon radiological findings encountered in ABPA include pulmonary masses, perihilar opacities simulating hilar adenopathy, and pleural effusions. However, miliary nodules as a radiological presentation of ABPA are very rare and only one case has been reported in literature. It is often misdiagnosed and mismanaged as tuberculosis; thus, the clinician should be vigilant enough to diagnose this very rare entity.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

CT scan of chest showing bilateral nodular opacities that are randomly scattered
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Figure 3: CT scan of chest showing bilateral nodular opacities that are randomly scattered

Mentions: High-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) of the chest [Figure 3] showed randomly scattered nodular opacities distributed throughout both the lung fields. The patient was subjected to bronchoscopy and bronchoscopic lung biopsy. Cytological analysis of the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid did not reveal any abnormality but there was growth of A. fumigatus. The bronchoscopic lung biopsy revealed findings of eosinophilic pneumonia [Figure 4].


Miliary nodules: An unusual presentation of allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis.

Aneja P, Singh UP, Kaur B, Patel K - Lung India (2014)

CT scan of chest showing bilateral nodular opacities that are randomly scattered
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4129607&req=5

Figure 3: CT scan of chest showing bilateral nodular opacities that are randomly scattered
Mentions: High-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) of the chest [Figure 3] showed randomly scattered nodular opacities distributed throughout both the lung fields. The patient was subjected to bronchoscopy and bronchoscopic lung biopsy. Cytological analysis of the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid did not reveal any abnormality but there was growth of A. fumigatus. The bronchoscopic lung biopsy revealed findings of eosinophilic pneumonia [Figure 4].

Bottom Line: The common radiological abnormalities encountered are fleeting pulmonary opacities, bronchiectasis, and mucoid impaction.Uncommon radiological findings encountered in ABPA include pulmonary masses, perihilar opacities simulating hilar adenopathy, and pleural effusions.It is often misdiagnosed and mismanaged as tuberculosis; thus, the clinician should be vigilant enough to diagnose this very rare entity.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Government Medical College, Patiala, Punjab, India.

ABSTRACT
Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA) is an immune-mediated inflammatory disease caused by hypersensitivity to Aspergillus fumigatus. A wide spectrum of plain radiographic appearances has been described in ABPA, though none are pathognomonic of ABPA. The common radiological abnormalities encountered are fleeting pulmonary opacities, bronchiectasis, and mucoid impaction. Uncommon radiological findings encountered in ABPA include pulmonary masses, perihilar opacities simulating hilar adenopathy, and pleural effusions. However, miliary nodules as a radiological presentation of ABPA are very rare and only one case has been reported in literature. It is often misdiagnosed and mismanaged as tuberculosis; thus, the clinician should be vigilant enough to diagnose this very rare entity.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus