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Neuroprotective effect of epidural hypothermia after spinal cord lesion in rats.

Barbosa MO, Cristante AF, Santos GB, Ferreira R, Marcon RM, Barros Filho TE - Clinics (Sao Paulo) (2014)

Bottom Line: Analysis of the Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan scores obtained during the six-week period indicated that there were no significant differences between the two groups.There was no significant difference between the groups in the inclined plane test scores during the six-week period.Furthermore, at the end of the study, the latency and amplitude values of the motor evoked potential test were not significantly different between the two groups.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Hospital das Forças Armadas (HFA), Brasília, DF, Brazil.

ABSTRACT

Objectives: To evaluate the neuroprotective effect of epidural hypothermia in rats subjected to experimental spinal cord lesion.

Methods: Wistar rats (n = 30) weighing 320-360 g were randomized to two groups (hypothermia and control) of 15 rats per group. A spinal cord lesion was induced by the standardized drop of a 10-g weight from a height of 2.5 cm, using the New York University Impactor, after laminectomy at the T9-10 level. Rats in the hypothermia group underwent epidural hypothermia for 20 minutes immediately after spinal cord injury. Motor function was assessed for six weeks using the Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan motor scores and the inclined plane test. At the end of the final week, the rats' neurological status was monitored by the motor evoked potential test and the results for the two groups were compared.

Results: Analysis of the Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan scores obtained during the six-week period indicated that there were no significant differences between the two groups. There was no significant difference between the groups in the inclined plane test scores during the six-week period. Furthermore, at the end of the study, the latency and amplitude values of the motor evoked potential test were not significantly different between the two groups.

Conclusion: Hypothermia did not produce a neuroprotective effect when applied at the injury level and in the epidural space immediately after induction of a spinal cord contusion in Wistar rats.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Comparison of BBB scores between groups along six weeks: hypothermia group in blue and control group in red.
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f2-cln_69p559: Comparison of BBB scores between groups along six weeks: hypothermia group in blue and control group in red.

Mentions: There was no significant difference between the groups regarding the weight of the rats. There was no between-group difference in the BBB score at the end of each week (p>0.05; Figure 2). The average score on the inclined plane test was compared on a weekly basis and no significant difference was identified (p>0.06; Figure 3). At the end of the final week, the evoked potential was measured in the left and right posterior limbs of the rats and no difference was identified between the experimental and control groups (p = 0.11 for the left limb and p = 0.63 for the right limb; (Figure 4). The average latency values were also similar between groups (p = 0.182 for the left limb and p = 0.737 for the right limb; Figure 5). Because no differences were identified between the amplitudes for the right and left posterior limbs within each group, we pooled the samples and compared the amplitudes and latencies of the hind limbs between groups. We did not identify significant differences in the amplitudes of the motor evoked potential or in the latency in the hind limbs (Table 1).


Neuroprotective effect of epidural hypothermia after spinal cord lesion in rats.

Barbosa MO, Cristante AF, Santos GB, Ferreira R, Marcon RM, Barros Filho TE - Clinics (Sao Paulo) (2014)

Comparison of BBB scores between groups along six weeks: hypothermia group in blue and control group in red.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4129554&req=5

f2-cln_69p559: Comparison of BBB scores between groups along six weeks: hypothermia group in blue and control group in red.
Mentions: There was no significant difference between the groups regarding the weight of the rats. There was no between-group difference in the BBB score at the end of each week (p>0.05; Figure 2). The average score on the inclined plane test was compared on a weekly basis and no significant difference was identified (p>0.06; Figure 3). At the end of the final week, the evoked potential was measured in the left and right posterior limbs of the rats and no difference was identified between the experimental and control groups (p = 0.11 for the left limb and p = 0.63 for the right limb; (Figure 4). The average latency values were also similar between groups (p = 0.182 for the left limb and p = 0.737 for the right limb; Figure 5). Because no differences were identified between the amplitudes for the right and left posterior limbs within each group, we pooled the samples and compared the amplitudes and latencies of the hind limbs between groups. We did not identify significant differences in the amplitudes of the motor evoked potential or in the latency in the hind limbs (Table 1).

Bottom Line: Analysis of the Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan scores obtained during the six-week period indicated that there were no significant differences between the two groups.There was no significant difference between the groups in the inclined plane test scores during the six-week period.Furthermore, at the end of the study, the latency and amplitude values of the motor evoked potential test were not significantly different between the two groups.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Hospital das Forças Armadas (HFA), Brasília, DF, Brazil.

ABSTRACT

Objectives: To evaluate the neuroprotective effect of epidural hypothermia in rats subjected to experimental spinal cord lesion.

Methods: Wistar rats (n = 30) weighing 320-360 g were randomized to two groups (hypothermia and control) of 15 rats per group. A spinal cord lesion was induced by the standardized drop of a 10-g weight from a height of 2.5 cm, using the New York University Impactor, after laminectomy at the T9-10 level. Rats in the hypothermia group underwent epidural hypothermia for 20 minutes immediately after spinal cord injury. Motor function was assessed for six weeks using the Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan motor scores and the inclined plane test. At the end of the final week, the rats' neurological status was monitored by the motor evoked potential test and the results for the two groups were compared.

Results: Analysis of the Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan scores obtained during the six-week period indicated that there were no significant differences between the two groups. There was no significant difference between the groups in the inclined plane test scores during the six-week period. Furthermore, at the end of the study, the latency and amplitude values of the motor evoked potential test were not significantly different between the two groups.

Conclusion: Hypothermia did not produce a neuroprotective effect when applied at the injury level and in the epidural space immediately after induction of a spinal cord contusion in Wistar rats.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus