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The end of a myth-Bt (Cry1Ab) maize does not harm green lacewings.

Romeis J, Meissle M, Naranjo SE, Li Y, Bigler F - Front Plant Sci (2014)

Bottom Line: Although these effects could not be confirmed in subsequent studies, some authors still refer to them as evidence that Bt maize harms beneficial species.We provide a comprehensive review of the studies evaluating the effects of Bt (Cry1Ab) maize on C. carnea.We discuss how conceptual models can assist environmental risk assessments, and we emphasize the importance of robust and reproducible studies.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Agroscope, Institute for Sustainability Sciences ISS Zurich, Switzerland.

ABSTRACT
A concern with Bt-transgenic insect-resistant plants is their potential to harm non-target organisms. Early studies reported that Cry1Ab-producing Bt maize and purified Cry1Ab harmed larvae of the green lacewing, Chrysoperla carnea. Although these effects could not be confirmed in subsequent studies, some authors still refer to them as evidence that Bt maize harms beneficial species. We provide a comprehensive review of the studies evaluating the effects of Bt (Cry1Ab) maize on C. carnea. The evidence indicates that this important predator is not affected by Bt maize or by the produced Cry1Ab protein. We discuss how conceptual models can assist environmental risk assessments, and we emphasize the importance of robust and reproducible studies.

No MeSH data available.


Adult (A) and Larva (B) of the green lacewing Chrysoperla carnea. Photos: Agroscope (A, Mario Waldburger; B, Gabriela Brändle).
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Figure 1: Adult (A) and Larva (B) of the green lacewing Chrysoperla carnea. Photos: Agroscope (A, Mario Waldburger; B, Gabriela Brändle).

Mentions: Green lacewings in the genus Chrysoperla (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae) are widespread in agricultural areas worldwide (Figures 1A,B). The species are valued because the larvae are predators of small soft-bodied arthropods and thus contribute to the biological control of crop pests. The adults feed predominately on pollen, nectar, and homopteran honeydew. The most common species found throughout Europe is Chrysoperla carnea (Duelli, 2001; Meissle et al., 2012; Romeis et al., 2014). For the purpose of this paper, the name C. carnea is used for the carnea species group that includes a complex of cryptic, sibling species that are reproductively isolated by their mating songs (Duelli, 2001; Henry et al., 2001).


The end of a myth-Bt (Cry1Ab) maize does not harm green lacewings.

Romeis J, Meissle M, Naranjo SE, Li Y, Bigler F - Front Plant Sci (2014)

Adult (A) and Larva (B) of the green lacewing Chrysoperla carnea. Photos: Agroscope (A, Mario Waldburger; B, Gabriela Brändle).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4129496&req=5

Figure 1: Adult (A) and Larva (B) of the green lacewing Chrysoperla carnea. Photos: Agroscope (A, Mario Waldburger; B, Gabriela Brändle).
Mentions: Green lacewings in the genus Chrysoperla (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae) are widespread in agricultural areas worldwide (Figures 1A,B). The species are valued because the larvae are predators of small soft-bodied arthropods and thus contribute to the biological control of crop pests. The adults feed predominately on pollen, nectar, and homopteran honeydew. The most common species found throughout Europe is Chrysoperla carnea (Duelli, 2001; Meissle et al., 2012; Romeis et al., 2014). For the purpose of this paper, the name C. carnea is used for the carnea species group that includes a complex of cryptic, sibling species that are reproductively isolated by their mating songs (Duelli, 2001; Henry et al., 2001).

Bottom Line: Although these effects could not be confirmed in subsequent studies, some authors still refer to them as evidence that Bt maize harms beneficial species.We provide a comprehensive review of the studies evaluating the effects of Bt (Cry1Ab) maize on C. carnea.We discuss how conceptual models can assist environmental risk assessments, and we emphasize the importance of robust and reproducible studies.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Agroscope, Institute for Sustainability Sciences ISS Zurich, Switzerland.

ABSTRACT
A concern with Bt-transgenic insect-resistant plants is their potential to harm non-target organisms. Early studies reported that Cry1Ab-producing Bt maize and purified Cry1Ab harmed larvae of the green lacewing, Chrysoperla carnea. Although these effects could not be confirmed in subsequent studies, some authors still refer to them as evidence that Bt maize harms beneficial species. We provide a comprehensive review of the studies evaluating the effects of Bt (Cry1Ab) maize on C. carnea. The evidence indicates that this important predator is not affected by Bt maize or by the produced Cry1Ab protein. We discuss how conceptual models can assist environmental risk assessments, and we emphasize the importance of robust and reproducible studies.

No MeSH data available.