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Gas sensing of SnO2 nanocrystals revisited: developing ultra-sensitive sensors for detecting the H2S leakage of biogas.

Mei L, Chen Y, Ma J - Sci Rep (2014)

Bottom Line: As a typical mode of energy from waste, biogas technology is of great interest to researchers.The sensitivity of as-obtained SnO2 sensor towards 5 ppm H2S can reach up to 357.Such a technique based on SnO2 nanocrystals opens up a promising avenue for future practical applications in real-time monitoring a trace of H2S from the leakage of biogas.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Key Laboratory for Micro-Nano Optoelectronic Devices of Ministry of Education, State Key Laboratory for Chemo/Biosensing and Chemometrics, Hunan University, Changsha 410082, P. R. China.

ABSTRACT
As a typical mode of energy from waste, biogas technology is of great interest to researchers. To detect the trace H2S released from biogas, we herein demonstrate a high-performance sensor based on highly H2S-sensitive SnO2 nanocrystals, which have been selectively prepared by solvothermal methods using benzimidazole as a mineralization agent. The sensitivity of as-obtained SnO2 sensor towards 5 ppm H2S can reach up to 357. Such a technique based on SnO2 nanocrystals opens up a promising avenue for future practical applications in real-time monitoring a trace of H2S from the leakage of biogas.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

(a) the response of SNC1 sensor to 5 ppm H2S at different working temperature; (b) the response of SNC1 sensor to 100 ppm CH4 at different working temperature; (c and d) the repeat of SNC1 sensor to detect H2S and CH4 at 160°C, respectively.
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f8: (a) the response of SNC1 sensor to 5 ppm H2S at different working temperature; (b) the response of SNC1 sensor to 100 ppm CH4 at different working temperature; (c and d) the repeat of SNC1 sensor to detect H2S and CH4 at 160°C, respectively.

Mentions: Figure 8a shows the sensor response of SNC1 at different working temperatures to 5 ppm H2S. The sensor response S increases and reaches its maximum at about 160°C and then decreases rapidly with the increase of temperatures. Figure 8b displays the sensor response of SNC1 at different working temperatures to 100 ppm CH4. The sensor response S is similar from 45°C to 350°C, and reaches its maximum of 3.0 at about 200°C. Figure 8c and d show a continuous measurement of 5 ppm H2S and 100 ppm CH4. The result indicates that the SNC1 sensor have good repeatability.


Gas sensing of SnO2 nanocrystals revisited: developing ultra-sensitive sensors for detecting the H2S leakage of biogas.

Mei L, Chen Y, Ma J - Sci Rep (2014)

(a) the response of SNC1 sensor to 5 ppm H2S at different working temperature; (b) the response of SNC1 sensor to 100 ppm CH4 at different working temperature; (c and d) the repeat of SNC1 sensor to detect H2S and CH4 at 160°C, respectively.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4129425&req=5

f8: (a) the response of SNC1 sensor to 5 ppm H2S at different working temperature; (b) the response of SNC1 sensor to 100 ppm CH4 at different working temperature; (c and d) the repeat of SNC1 sensor to detect H2S and CH4 at 160°C, respectively.
Mentions: Figure 8a shows the sensor response of SNC1 at different working temperatures to 5 ppm H2S. The sensor response S increases and reaches its maximum at about 160°C and then decreases rapidly with the increase of temperatures. Figure 8b displays the sensor response of SNC1 at different working temperatures to 100 ppm CH4. The sensor response S is similar from 45°C to 350°C, and reaches its maximum of 3.0 at about 200°C. Figure 8c and d show a continuous measurement of 5 ppm H2S and 100 ppm CH4. The result indicates that the SNC1 sensor have good repeatability.

Bottom Line: As a typical mode of energy from waste, biogas technology is of great interest to researchers.The sensitivity of as-obtained SnO2 sensor towards 5 ppm H2S can reach up to 357.Such a technique based on SnO2 nanocrystals opens up a promising avenue for future practical applications in real-time monitoring a trace of H2S from the leakage of biogas.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Key Laboratory for Micro-Nano Optoelectronic Devices of Ministry of Education, State Key Laboratory for Chemo/Biosensing and Chemometrics, Hunan University, Changsha 410082, P. R. China.

ABSTRACT
As a typical mode of energy from waste, biogas technology is of great interest to researchers. To detect the trace H2S released from biogas, we herein demonstrate a high-performance sensor based on highly H2S-sensitive SnO2 nanocrystals, which have been selectively prepared by solvothermal methods using benzimidazole as a mineralization agent. The sensitivity of as-obtained SnO2 sensor towards 5 ppm H2S can reach up to 357. Such a technique based on SnO2 nanocrystals opens up a promising avenue for future practical applications in real-time monitoring a trace of H2S from the leakage of biogas.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus