Limits...
Gas sensing of SnO2 nanocrystals revisited: developing ultra-sensitive sensors for detecting the H2S leakage of biogas.

Mei L, Chen Y, Ma J - Sci Rep (2014)

Bottom Line: As a typical mode of energy from waste, biogas technology is of great interest to researchers.The sensitivity of as-obtained SnO2 sensor towards 5 ppm H2S can reach up to 357.Such a technique based on SnO2 nanocrystals opens up a promising avenue for future practical applications in real-time monitoring a trace of H2S from the leakage of biogas.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Key Laboratory for Micro-Nano Optoelectronic Devices of Ministry of Education, State Key Laboratory for Chemo/Biosensing and Chemometrics, Hunan University, Changsha 410082, P. R. China.

ABSTRACT
As a typical mode of energy from waste, biogas technology is of great interest to researchers. To detect the trace H2S released from biogas, we herein demonstrate a high-performance sensor based on highly H2S-sensitive SnO2 nanocrystals, which have been selectively prepared by solvothermal methods using benzimidazole as a mineralization agent. The sensitivity of as-obtained SnO2 sensor towards 5 ppm H2S can reach up to 357. Such a technique based on SnO2 nanocrystals opens up a promising avenue for future practical applications in real-time monitoring a trace of H2S from the leakage of biogas.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

(a) Response and recovery characteristics of SNC1 and c-SnO2 sensors at different concentration of H2S at 160°C. (b) The sensor responses of SnO2 nanocrystals at different concentration of H2S at 160°C.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4129425&req=5

f7: (a) Response and recovery characteristics of SNC1 and c-SnO2 sensors at different concentration of H2S at 160°C. (b) The sensor responses of SnO2 nanocrystals at different concentration of H2S at 160°C.

Mentions: The typical response-recovery curves of the sensors made from the as-synthesized SNC1 and commercial SnO2 (c-SnO2) exposed to different concentrations of H2S ranging from 0.5 ppm to 30 ppm were shown in Figure 7a. Figure 7b displays the sensor response of different SnO2 nanocrystals towards various concentrations of H2S. The SNC1 sensor shows a much larger response magnitude to each concentration of H2S, compared with other SnO2 sensors. It is obvious that the sensor based on SNC1 is able to detect a wide range of H2S concentrations, with detection limit in the ppb level while the response towards 0.5 ppm of H2S is still as high as 20.4, indicating its excellent sensitivity and stability. However, the response for SNC3, c-SnO2 and SNCb (Figure S9) are extremely slow, probably due to their aggregated characteristicsand lower SBET (The characterization of c-SnO2 is shown in Figure S6 and S7). When H2S concentration is in range of 0.5–30 ppm, the logarithm of the sensor response shows a good linearity against the logarithm of the gas concentrationas shown in Figure S10, which is in agreement with the theory of the power laws for semiconductor sensors33.


Gas sensing of SnO2 nanocrystals revisited: developing ultra-sensitive sensors for detecting the H2S leakage of biogas.

Mei L, Chen Y, Ma J - Sci Rep (2014)

(a) Response and recovery characteristics of SNC1 and c-SnO2 sensors at different concentration of H2S at 160°C. (b) The sensor responses of SnO2 nanocrystals at different concentration of H2S at 160°C.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4129425&req=5

f7: (a) Response and recovery characteristics of SNC1 and c-SnO2 sensors at different concentration of H2S at 160°C. (b) The sensor responses of SnO2 nanocrystals at different concentration of H2S at 160°C.
Mentions: The typical response-recovery curves of the sensors made from the as-synthesized SNC1 and commercial SnO2 (c-SnO2) exposed to different concentrations of H2S ranging from 0.5 ppm to 30 ppm were shown in Figure 7a. Figure 7b displays the sensor response of different SnO2 nanocrystals towards various concentrations of H2S. The SNC1 sensor shows a much larger response magnitude to each concentration of H2S, compared with other SnO2 sensors. It is obvious that the sensor based on SNC1 is able to detect a wide range of H2S concentrations, with detection limit in the ppb level while the response towards 0.5 ppm of H2S is still as high as 20.4, indicating its excellent sensitivity and stability. However, the response for SNC3, c-SnO2 and SNCb (Figure S9) are extremely slow, probably due to their aggregated characteristicsand lower SBET (The characterization of c-SnO2 is shown in Figure S6 and S7). When H2S concentration is in range of 0.5–30 ppm, the logarithm of the sensor response shows a good linearity against the logarithm of the gas concentrationas shown in Figure S10, which is in agreement with the theory of the power laws for semiconductor sensors33.

Bottom Line: As a typical mode of energy from waste, biogas technology is of great interest to researchers.The sensitivity of as-obtained SnO2 sensor towards 5 ppm H2S can reach up to 357.Such a technique based on SnO2 nanocrystals opens up a promising avenue for future practical applications in real-time monitoring a trace of H2S from the leakage of biogas.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Key Laboratory for Micro-Nano Optoelectronic Devices of Ministry of Education, State Key Laboratory for Chemo/Biosensing and Chemometrics, Hunan University, Changsha 410082, P. R. China.

ABSTRACT
As a typical mode of energy from waste, biogas technology is of great interest to researchers. To detect the trace H2S released from biogas, we herein demonstrate a high-performance sensor based on highly H2S-sensitive SnO2 nanocrystals, which have been selectively prepared by solvothermal methods using benzimidazole as a mineralization agent. The sensitivity of as-obtained SnO2 sensor towards 5 ppm H2S can reach up to 357. Such a technique based on SnO2 nanocrystals opens up a promising avenue for future practical applications in real-time monitoring a trace of H2S from the leakage of biogas.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus