Limits...
Gas sensing of SnO2 nanocrystals revisited: developing ultra-sensitive sensors for detecting the H2S leakage of biogas.

Mei L, Chen Y, Ma J - Sci Rep (2014)

Bottom Line: As a typical mode of energy from waste, biogas technology is of great interest to researchers.The sensitivity of as-obtained SnO2 sensor towards 5 ppm H2S can reach up to 357.Such a technique based on SnO2 nanocrystals opens up a promising avenue for future practical applications in real-time monitoring a trace of H2S from the leakage of biogas.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Key Laboratory for Micro-Nano Optoelectronic Devices of Ministry of Education, State Key Laboratory for Chemo/Biosensing and Chemometrics, Hunan University, Changsha 410082, P. R. China.

ABSTRACT
As a typical mode of energy from waste, biogas technology is of great interest to researchers. To detect the trace H2S released from biogas, we herein demonstrate a high-performance sensor based on highly H2S-sensitive SnO2 nanocrystals, which have been selectively prepared by solvothermal methods using benzimidazole as a mineralization agent. The sensitivity of as-obtained SnO2 sensor towards 5 ppm H2S can reach up to 357. Such a technique based on SnO2 nanocrystals opens up a promising avenue for future practical applications in real-time monitoring a trace of H2S from the leakage of biogas.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Schematic illustration of chemical reactions on SnO2 nanocrystals surface underlying H2S sensor mechanism.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4129425&req=5

f10: Schematic illustration of chemical reactions on SnO2 nanocrystals surface underlying H2S sensor mechanism.

Mentions: The height of energy barrier to electron transport between neighboring grains in the SnO2 is an important factor, which determines sensitivity of the material47. The temperature dependence of the conductivity of a semiconductorcan be approximated by the Arrheniusequation50: Where σ0 is a factor that includes the bulk in tragranular conductance, k the Boltzmann's constant, T the absolute temperature, and eVs the potential energy barrier at the interface between two neighboring particles. Where Nt is the surface density of adsorbed oxygen ions (O2− or O−), εrε0 is the permittivity of the semiconductor, and Nd is the volumetric density of the electron donors. Clearly, the energy barrier is a function of temperature and atmosphere (oxygen partial pressure), each of these parameters influences the energy barrier, conductivity, and thus the sensitivity. Further, eVs depends on the particle size, especially when the particle size is reduced to nanometer or in the order of the thickness of charge depletion layer (Xd). Different particle size corresponds to different ratio of Xd to the radius of the particles, provided that the absolute value of Xd is relatively independent of particle size495152. If the particle size is much larger than the Xd, the band bending or aggregated is restricted to the surface region of the particle, as shown in Figure 10. When the particle size is nanometer, the properties of particles change dramatically due to solid-gas interactions. SNC1 is anticipated that both SBET and the size of particles can influence sensor response.


Gas sensing of SnO2 nanocrystals revisited: developing ultra-sensitive sensors for detecting the H2S leakage of biogas.

Mei L, Chen Y, Ma J - Sci Rep (2014)

Schematic illustration of chemical reactions on SnO2 nanocrystals surface underlying H2S sensor mechanism.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4129425&req=5

f10: Schematic illustration of chemical reactions on SnO2 nanocrystals surface underlying H2S sensor mechanism.
Mentions: The height of energy barrier to electron transport between neighboring grains in the SnO2 is an important factor, which determines sensitivity of the material47. The temperature dependence of the conductivity of a semiconductorcan be approximated by the Arrheniusequation50: Where σ0 is a factor that includes the bulk in tragranular conductance, k the Boltzmann's constant, T the absolute temperature, and eVs the potential energy barrier at the interface between two neighboring particles. Where Nt is the surface density of adsorbed oxygen ions (O2− or O−), εrε0 is the permittivity of the semiconductor, and Nd is the volumetric density of the electron donors. Clearly, the energy barrier is a function of temperature and atmosphere (oxygen partial pressure), each of these parameters influences the energy barrier, conductivity, and thus the sensitivity. Further, eVs depends on the particle size, especially when the particle size is reduced to nanometer or in the order of the thickness of charge depletion layer (Xd). Different particle size corresponds to different ratio of Xd to the radius of the particles, provided that the absolute value of Xd is relatively independent of particle size495152. If the particle size is much larger than the Xd, the band bending or aggregated is restricted to the surface region of the particle, as shown in Figure 10. When the particle size is nanometer, the properties of particles change dramatically due to solid-gas interactions. SNC1 is anticipated that both SBET and the size of particles can influence sensor response.

Bottom Line: As a typical mode of energy from waste, biogas technology is of great interest to researchers.The sensitivity of as-obtained SnO2 sensor towards 5 ppm H2S can reach up to 357.Such a technique based on SnO2 nanocrystals opens up a promising avenue for future practical applications in real-time monitoring a trace of H2S from the leakage of biogas.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Key Laboratory for Micro-Nano Optoelectronic Devices of Ministry of Education, State Key Laboratory for Chemo/Biosensing and Chemometrics, Hunan University, Changsha 410082, P. R. China.

ABSTRACT
As a typical mode of energy from waste, biogas technology is of great interest to researchers. To detect the trace H2S released from biogas, we herein demonstrate a high-performance sensor based on highly H2S-sensitive SnO2 nanocrystals, which have been selectively prepared by solvothermal methods using benzimidazole as a mineralization agent. The sensitivity of as-obtained SnO2 sensor towards 5 ppm H2S can reach up to 357. Such a technique based on SnO2 nanocrystals opens up a promising avenue for future practical applications in real-time monitoring a trace of H2S from the leakage of biogas.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus