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Ambient Coarse Particulate Matter and Human Health: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

Adar SD, Filigrana PA, Clements N, Peel JL - Curr Environ Health Rep (2014)

Bottom Line: Inconsistent relationships between effect estimates for PM10-2.5 and correlations between PM10-2.5 and PM2.5 concentrations, however, indicate that PM10-2.5 associations cannot be solely explained by co-exposure to PM2.5.While suggestive evidence was found of increased mortality with long-term PM10-2.5 concentrations, these associations were not robust to control for PM2.5.Additional research is required to better understand sources of heterogeneity of associations between PM10-2.5 and adverse health outcomes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Epidemiology, University of Michigan, School of Public Health, 1420 Washington Heights - SPHII-5539, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2029 USA.

ABSTRACT
Airborne particles have been linked to increased mortality and morbidity. As most research has focused on fine particles (PM2.5), the health implications of coarse particles (PM10-2.5) are not well understood. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of associations for short- and long-term PM10-2.5 concentrations with mortality and hospital admissions. Using 23 mortality and 10 hospital admissions studies, we documented suggestive evidence of increased morbidity and mortality in relation to higher short-term PM10-2.5 concentrations, with stronger relationships for respiratory than cardiovascular endpoints. Reported associations were highly heterogeneous, however, especially by geographic region and average PM10-2.5 concentrations. Adjustment for PM2.5 and publication bias resulted in weaker and less precise effect estimates, although positive associations remained for short-term PM10-2.5 concentrations. Inconsistent relationships between effect estimates for PM10-2.5 and correlations between PM10-2.5 and PM2.5 concentrations, however, indicate that PM10-2.5 associations cannot be solely explained by co-exposure to PM2.5. While suggestive evidence was found of increased mortality with long-term PM10-2.5 concentrations, these associations were not robust to control for PM2.5. Additional research is required to better understand sources of heterogeneity of associations between PM10-2.5 and adverse health outcomes.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Summary incidence rate ratios for short-term exposures to PM10-2.5 with mortality by study characteristics. Note: Estimates stratified by concentrations include city-specific data from Malig and Ostro [35] and Chock et al. [45] provided via personal correspondence. Estimates were also provided by Zanobetti and Schwartz [33••] but ultimately not included because the use of shrunken Bayes estimates could have undue influence on our results
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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Fig2: Summary incidence rate ratios for short-term exposures to PM10-2.5 with mortality by study characteristics. Note: Estimates stratified by concentrations include city-specific data from Malig and Ostro [35] and Chock et al. [45] provided via personal correspondence. Estimates were also provided by Zanobetti and Schwartz [33••] but ultimately not included because the use of shrunken Bayes estimates could have undue influence on our results

Mentions: All outcomes except cardiovascular disease hospital admissions showed moderate (I2 = 51–68 %) and statistically significant heterogeneity in the point estimates for PM10-2.5 (Table 2). As shown in Figs. 2 and 3, location appeared to be an important explanatory factor for this heterogeneity with stratified analyses indicating that European cities consistently had larger PM10-2.5 associations than North America for all outcomes except for cardiovascular mortality. Although there was no clear evidence of heterogeneity by PM2.5 concentrations, there was some evidence of lower rate ratios with higher PM10-2.5 concentrations for both mortality and hospital admissions. Lower rate ratios were also found when PM10-2.5 was more than half of the reported PM10 concentrations for hospital admissions but not mortality (meta-regression p-value: 0.06). There was also a suggestion of weaker associations with total mortality among studies using TEOMs and stronger associations among studies using dichotomous samplers but the sample size was small and the differences were not large (results not shown). There were insufficient numbers to examine these relationships with outcomes other than cardiovascular and respiratory mortality and admissions.Fig. 2


Ambient Coarse Particulate Matter and Human Health: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

Adar SD, Filigrana PA, Clements N, Peel JL - Curr Environ Health Rep (2014)

Summary incidence rate ratios for short-term exposures to PM10-2.5 with mortality by study characteristics. Note: Estimates stratified by concentrations include city-specific data from Malig and Ostro [35] and Chock et al. [45] provided via personal correspondence. Estimates were also provided by Zanobetti and Schwartz [33••] but ultimately not included because the use of shrunken Bayes estimates could have undue influence on our results
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4129238&req=5

Fig2: Summary incidence rate ratios for short-term exposures to PM10-2.5 with mortality by study characteristics. Note: Estimates stratified by concentrations include city-specific data from Malig and Ostro [35] and Chock et al. [45] provided via personal correspondence. Estimates were also provided by Zanobetti and Schwartz [33••] but ultimately not included because the use of shrunken Bayes estimates could have undue influence on our results
Mentions: All outcomes except cardiovascular disease hospital admissions showed moderate (I2 = 51–68 %) and statistically significant heterogeneity in the point estimates for PM10-2.5 (Table 2). As shown in Figs. 2 and 3, location appeared to be an important explanatory factor for this heterogeneity with stratified analyses indicating that European cities consistently had larger PM10-2.5 associations than North America for all outcomes except for cardiovascular mortality. Although there was no clear evidence of heterogeneity by PM2.5 concentrations, there was some evidence of lower rate ratios with higher PM10-2.5 concentrations for both mortality and hospital admissions. Lower rate ratios were also found when PM10-2.5 was more than half of the reported PM10 concentrations for hospital admissions but not mortality (meta-regression p-value: 0.06). There was also a suggestion of weaker associations with total mortality among studies using TEOMs and stronger associations among studies using dichotomous samplers but the sample size was small and the differences were not large (results not shown). There were insufficient numbers to examine these relationships with outcomes other than cardiovascular and respiratory mortality and admissions.Fig. 2

Bottom Line: Inconsistent relationships between effect estimates for PM10-2.5 and correlations between PM10-2.5 and PM2.5 concentrations, however, indicate that PM10-2.5 associations cannot be solely explained by co-exposure to PM2.5.While suggestive evidence was found of increased mortality with long-term PM10-2.5 concentrations, these associations were not robust to control for PM2.5.Additional research is required to better understand sources of heterogeneity of associations between PM10-2.5 and adverse health outcomes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Epidemiology, University of Michigan, School of Public Health, 1420 Washington Heights - SPHII-5539, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2029 USA.

ABSTRACT
Airborne particles have been linked to increased mortality and morbidity. As most research has focused on fine particles (PM2.5), the health implications of coarse particles (PM10-2.5) are not well understood. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of associations for short- and long-term PM10-2.5 concentrations with mortality and hospital admissions. Using 23 mortality and 10 hospital admissions studies, we documented suggestive evidence of increased morbidity and mortality in relation to higher short-term PM10-2.5 concentrations, with stronger relationships for respiratory than cardiovascular endpoints. Reported associations were highly heterogeneous, however, especially by geographic region and average PM10-2.5 concentrations. Adjustment for PM2.5 and publication bias resulted in weaker and less precise effect estimates, although positive associations remained for short-term PM10-2.5 concentrations. Inconsistent relationships between effect estimates for PM10-2.5 and correlations between PM10-2.5 and PM2.5 concentrations, however, indicate that PM10-2.5 associations cannot be solely explained by co-exposure to PM2.5. While suggestive evidence was found of increased mortality with long-term PM10-2.5 concentrations, these associations were not robust to control for PM2.5. Additional research is required to better understand sources of heterogeneity of associations between PM10-2.5 and adverse health outcomes.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus