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Public Health Perspectives on Aquaculture.

Gormaz JG, Fry JP, Erazo M, Love DC - Curr Environ Health Rep (2014)

Bottom Line: Nearly half of all seafood consumed globally comes from aquaculture, a method of food production that has expanded rapidly in recent years.Resolving these complicated human health and ecologic trade-offs requires systems thinking and collaboration across many fields; the One Health concept is an integrative approach that brings veterinary and human health experts together to combat zoonotic disease.This expanded application of One Health may also have relevance to other complex systems with similar trade-offs.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Molecular and Clinical Pharmacology Program, Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Chile, Independencia 1027, Región Metropolitana Santiago, Chile.

ABSTRACT
Nearly half of all seafood consumed globally comes from aquaculture, a method of food production that has expanded rapidly in recent years. Increasing seafood consumption has been proposed as part of a strategy to combat the current non-communicable disease (NCD) pandemic, but public health, environmental, social, and production challenges related to certain types of aquaculture production must be addressed. Resolving these complicated human health and ecologic trade-offs requires systems thinking and collaboration across many fields; the One Health concept is an integrative approach that brings veterinary and human health experts together to combat zoonotic disease. We propose applying and expanding the One Health approach to facilitate collaboration among stakeholders focused on increasing consumption of seafood and expanding aquaculture production, using methods that minimize risks to public health, animal health, and ecology. This expanded application of One Health may also have relevance to other complex systems with similar trade-offs.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

One Health and aquaculture
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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Fig1: One Health and aquaculture

Mentions: In many populations around the world, several factors have led to an overall shift in eating habits toward terrestrial livestock products and calorie-dense, nutrient-poor, highly processed foods [5, 6]. This shift, as well as other lifestyle and environmental factors, has contributed to a non-communicable disease (NCD) pandemic in many high-income, middle-income, and even some low-income countries [7–9]. In recent years, both the United Nations and the World Health Organization have recognized the global threat of NCDs and tried to strengthen national efforts to reduce their burden [10•, 11]. Seafood has been recognized as an important source of healthy dietary fats [12]. Many countries have developed a variety of dietary and physical activity recommendations for their citizens, many of which are related to dietary fat intake, such as eliminating intake of trans-fatty acids, reducing intake of saturated fats, and increasing consumption of healthy mono- and polyunsaturated fats, which can come from seafood [13–15]. The US government has issued dietary guidelines specifically promoting increased consumption of a variety of seafood in place of some meat and poultry [13]. Following seafood dietary guidelines may improve health for some, but increasing seafood consumption would require increased aquaculture production and wild-caught fish harvests. It may not be possible for wealthier nations to make progress on this recommendation without depleting global fisheries and further harming aquatic ecosystems, which could impact the food supplies of other nations [16]. Therefore, it is insufficient to simply increase seafood production without also taking equity and the protection of the public’s health and natural resources into account. To address these issues, we propose applying and expanding the One Health approach, which is an existing model for promoting synergy among the disciplines of human, animal, and environmental health sciences. Figure 1 describes several key topics for One Health and aquaculture, many of which are covered in this manuscript. Applying the One Health concept to aquaculture and the human health sciences could stimulate collaboration among scientists and other professionals who work on these issues.Fig. 1


Public Health Perspectives on Aquaculture.

Gormaz JG, Fry JP, Erazo M, Love DC - Curr Environ Health Rep (2014)

One Health and aquaculture
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4129235&req=5

Fig1: One Health and aquaculture
Mentions: In many populations around the world, several factors have led to an overall shift in eating habits toward terrestrial livestock products and calorie-dense, nutrient-poor, highly processed foods [5, 6]. This shift, as well as other lifestyle and environmental factors, has contributed to a non-communicable disease (NCD) pandemic in many high-income, middle-income, and even some low-income countries [7–9]. In recent years, both the United Nations and the World Health Organization have recognized the global threat of NCDs and tried to strengthen national efforts to reduce their burden [10•, 11]. Seafood has been recognized as an important source of healthy dietary fats [12]. Many countries have developed a variety of dietary and physical activity recommendations for their citizens, many of which are related to dietary fat intake, such as eliminating intake of trans-fatty acids, reducing intake of saturated fats, and increasing consumption of healthy mono- and polyunsaturated fats, which can come from seafood [13–15]. The US government has issued dietary guidelines specifically promoting increased consumption of a variety of seafood in place of some meat and poultry [13]. Following seafood dietary guidelines may improve health for some, but increasing seafood consumption would require increased aquaculture production and wild-caught fish harvests. It may not be possible for wealthier nations to make progress on this recommendation without depleting global fisheries and further harming aquatic ecosystems, which could impact the food supplies of other nations [16]. Therefore, it is insufficient to simply increase seafood production without also taking equity and the protection of the public’s health and natural resources into account. To address these issues, we propose applying and expanding the One Health approach, which is an existing model for promoting synergy among the disciplines of human, animal, and environmental health sciences. Figure 1 describes several key topics for One Health and aquaculture, many of which are covered in this manuscript. Applying the One Health concept to aquaculture and the human health sciences could stimulate collaboration among scientists and other professionals who work on these issues.Fig. 1

Bottom Line: Nearly half of all seafood consumed globally comes from aquaculture, a method of food production that has expanded rapidly in recent years.Resolving these complicated human health and ecologic trade-offs requires systems thinking and collaboration across many fields; the One Health concept is an integrative approach that brings veterinary and human health experts together to combat zoonotic disease.This expanded application of One Health may also have relevance to other complex systems with similar trade-offs.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Molecular and Clinical Pharmacology Program, Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Chile, Independencia 1027, Región Metropolitana Santiago, Chile.

ABSTRACT
Nearly half of all seafood consumed globally comes from aquaculture, a method of food production that has expanded rapidly in recent years. Increasing seafood consumption has been proposed as part of a strategy to combat the current non-communicable disease (NCD) pandemic, but public health, environmental, social, and production challenges related to certain types of aquaculture production must be addressed. Resolving these complicated human health and ecologic trade-offs requires systems thinking and collaboration across many fields; the One Health concept is an integrative approach that brings veterinary and human health experts together to combat zoonotic disease. We propose applying and expanding the One Health approach to facilitate collaboration among stakeholders focused on increasing consumption of seafood and expanding aquaculture production, using methods that minimize risks to public health, animal health, and ecology. This expanded application of One Health may also have relevance to other complex systems with similar trade-offs.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus