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Acute kidney injury after using contrast during cardiac catheterization in children with heart disease.

Hwang YJ, Hyun MC, Choi BS, Chun SY, Cho MH - J. Korean Med. Sci. (2014)

Bottom Line: Acute kidney injury (AKI) is closely associated with the mortality of hospitalized patients and long-term development of chronic kidney disease, especially in children.Unlike urine kidney injury molecule-1, IL-18 and neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin, urine liver-type fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP) level showed biphasic pattern and the significant difference in the levels of urine L-FABP between 24 and 48 hr.We suggest that urine L-FABP can be one of the useful biomarkers to detect subclinical AKI developed by the contrast before cardiac surgery.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pediatrics, Kyungpook National University School of Medicine, Daegu, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Acute kidney injury (AKI) is closely associated with the mortality of hospitalized patients and long-term development of chronic kidney disease, especially in children. The purpose of our study was to assess the evidence of contrast-induced AKI after cardiac catheterization in children with heart disease and evaluate the clinical usefulness of candidate biomarkers in AKI. A total of 26 children undergoing cardiac catheterization due to various heart diseases were selected and urine and blood samples were taken at 0 hr, 6 hr, 24 hr, and 48 hr after cardiac catheterization. Until 48 hr after cardiac catheterization, there was no significant increase in serum creatinine level in all patients. Unlike urine kidney injury molecule-1, IL-18 and neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin, urine liver-type fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP) level showed biphasic pattern and the significant difference in the levels of urine L-FABP between 24 and 48 hr. We suggest that urine L-FABP can be one of the useful biomarkers to detect subclinical AKI developed by the contrast before cardiac surgery.

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Change of urine L-FABP at time after cardiac catheterization using contrast. L-FABP, liver-type fatty acid-binding protein. 24 vs. 48 hr, P = 0.019.
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Figure 2: Change of urine L-FABP at time after cardiac catheterization using contrast. L-FABP, liver-type fatty acid-binding protein. 24 vs. 48 hr, P = 0.019.

Mentions: However, urine L-FABP level showed biphasic patterns, increasing at 6 hr (9,599.4±7,771.6 pg/mL) after the procedure compared to the baseline level (0 hr, 5,276.6±6,474.6 pg/mL) and then the decreasing until 48 hr (24 and 48 hr after the procedure). There was a significant difference in the levels of urine L-FABP between 24 hr (8,953.6±9,577.8 pg/mL) and 48 hr (4,480.6±8,326.2 pg/mL) (P=0.019) (Table 2, Fig. 2). When the values of urine IL-18, NGAL and L-FABP except for urine KIM-1 were adjusted using urine creatinine (from pg/mL to ng/mg creatinine), the pattern of results was unchanged.


Acute kidney injury after using contrast during cardiac catheterization in children with heart disease.

Hwang YJ, Hyun MC, Choi BS, Chun SY, Cho MH - J. Korean Med. Sci. (2014)

Change of urine L-FABP at time after cardiac catheterization using contrast. L-FABP, liver-type fatty acid-binding protein. 24 vs. 48 hr, P = 0.019.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4129202&req=5

Figure 2: Change of urine L-FABP at time after cardiac catheterization using contrast. L-FABP, liver-type fatty acid-binding protein. 24 vs. 48 hr, P = 0.019.
Mentions: However, urine L-FABP level showed biphasic patterns, increasing at 6 hr (9,599.4±7,771.6 pg/mL) after the procedure compared to the baseline level (0 hr, 5,276.6±6,474.6 pg/mL) and then the decreasing until 48 hr (24 and 48 hr after the procedure). There was a significant difference in the levels of urine L-FABP between 24 hr (8,953.6±9,577.8 pg/mL) and 48 hr (4,480.6±8,326.2 pg/mL) (P=0.019) (Table 2, Fig. 2). When the values of urine IL-18, NGAL and L-FABP except for urine KIM-1 were adjusted using urine creatinine (from pg/mL to ng/mg creatinine), the pattern of results was unchanged.

Bottom Line: Acute kidney injury (AKI) is closely associated with the mortality of hospitalized patients and long-term development of chronic kidney disease, especially in children.Unlike urine kidney injury molecule-1, IL-18 and neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin, urine liver-type fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP) level showed biphasic pattern and the significant difference in the levels of urine L-FABP between 24 and 48 hr.We suggest that urine L-FABP can be one of the useful biomarkers to detect subclinical AKI developed by the contrast before cardiac surgery.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pediatrics, Kyungpook National University School of Medicine, Daegu, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Acute kidney injury (AKI) is closely associated with the mortality of hospitalized patients and long-term development of chronic kidney disease, especially in children. The purpose of our study was to assess the evidence of contrast-induced AKI after cardiac catheterization in children with heart disease and evaluate the clinical usefulness of candidate biomarkers in AKI. A total of 26 children undergoing cardiac catheterization due to various heart diseases were selected and urine and blood samples were taken at 0 hr, 6 hr, 24 hr, and 48 hr after cardiac catheterization. Until 48 hr after cardiac catheterization, there was no significant increase in serum creatinine level in all patients. Unlike urine kidney injury molecule-1, IL-18 and neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin, urine liver-type fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP) level showed biphasic pattern and the significant difference in the levels of urine L-FABP between 24 and 48 hr. We suggest that urine L-FABP can be one of the useful biomarkers to detect subclinical AKI developed by the contrast before cardiac surgery.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus