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A Novel Approach to Realizing Routine HIV Screening and Enhancing Linkage to Care in the United States: Protocol of the FOCUS Program and Early Results.

Sanchez TH, Sullivan PS, Rothman RE, Brown EH, Fitzpatrick LK, Wood AF, Hernandez PI, Nunn AS, Serota ML, Moreno-Walton L - JMIR Res Protoc (2014)

Bottom Line: The United States health care system remains far from implementing the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's recommendation of routine human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) screening as part of health care for adults.Although consensus for the importance of screening has grown, innovations in implementing routine screening are still lacking.From program launch in 2010 through October 2013, the partnerships have resulted in a total of 799,573 HIV tests and 0.68% (5425/799,573) tested positive.

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Affiliation: Emory University, Atlanta, GA, United States. Travis.Sanchez@emory.edu.

ABSTRACT

Background: The United States health care system remains far from implementing the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's recommendation of routine human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) screening as part of health care for adults. Although consensus for the importance of screening has grown, innovations in implementing routine screening are still lacking. HIV on the Frontlines of Communities in the United States (FOCUS) was launched in 2010 to provide an environment for testing innovative approaches to routine HIV screening and linkage to care.

Objective: The strategy of the FOCUS program was to develop models that maximize the use of information systems, fully integrate HIV screening into clinical practice, transform basic perceptions about routine HIV screening, and capitalize on emerging technologies in health care settings and laboratories.

Methods: In 10 of the most highly impacted cities, the FOCUS program supports 153 partnerships to increase routine HIV screening in clinical and community settings.

Results: From program launch in 2010 through October 2013, the partnerships have resulted in a total of 799,573 HIV tests and 0.68% (5425/799,573) tested positive.

Conclusions: The FOCUS program is a unique model that will identify best practices for HIV screening and linkage to care.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

FOCUS strategy.
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figure2: FOCUS strategy.

Mentions: HIV on the Frontlines of Communities in the United States (FOCUS) was launched in 2010 and is a program of Gilead Sciences, Inc. The overall program goals are to create, implement, improve, and rapidly disseminate transformative approaches that make HIV screening a truly routine practice in both clinical and community settings and that improve linkage to HIV care for all persons living with HIV. The FOCUS program is implemented through a multilevel strategy (Figure 2).


A Novel Approach to Realizing Routine HIV Screening and Enhancing Linkage to Care in the United States: Protocol of the FOCUS Program and Early Results.

Sanchez TH, Sullivan PS, Rothman RE, Brown EH, Fitzpatrick LK, Wood AF, Hernandez PI, Nunn AS, Serota ML, Moreno-Walton L - JMIR Res Protoc (2014)

FOCUS strategy.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4129189&req=5

figure2: FOCUS strategy.
Mentions: HIV on the Frontlines of Communities in the United States (FOCUS) was launched in 2010 and is a program of Gilead Sciences, Inc. The overall program goals are to create, implement, improve, and rapidly disseminate transformative approaches that make HIV screening a truly routine practice in both clinical and community settings and that improve linkage to HIV care for all persons living with HIV. The FOCUS program is implemented through a multilevel strategy (Figure 2).

Bottom Line: The United States health care system remains far from implementing the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's recommendation of routine human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) screening as part of health care for adults.Although consensus for the importance of screening has grown, innovations in implementing routine screening are still lacking.From program launch in 2010 through October 2013, the partnerships have resulted in a total of 799,573 HIV tests and 0.68% (5425/799,573) tested positive.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Emory University, Atlanta, GA, United States. Travis.Sanchez@emory.edu.

ABSTRACT

Background: The United States health care system remains far from implementing the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's recommendation of routine human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) screening as part of health care for adults. Although consensus for the importance of screening has grown, innovations in implementing routine screening are still lacking. HIV on the Frontlines of Communities in the United States (FOCUS) was launched in 2010 to provide an environment for testing innovative approaches to routine HIV screening and linkage to care.

Objective: The strategy of the FOCUS program was to develop models that maximize the use of information systems, fully integrate HIV screening into clinical practice, transform basic perceptions about routine HIV screening, and capitalize on emerging technologies in health care settings and laboratories.

Methods: In 10 of the most highly impacted cities, the FOCUS program supports 153 partnerships to increase routine HIV screening in clinical and community settings.

Results: From program launch in 2010 through October 2013, the partnerships have resulted in a total of 799,573 HIV tests and 0.68% (5425/799,573) tested positive.

Conclusions: The FOCUS program is a unique model that will identify best practices for HIV screening and linkage to care.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus