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Surface electromyography during physical exercise in water: a systematic review.

Cuesta-Vargas AI, Cano-Herrera CL - BMC Sports Sci Med Rehabil (2014)

Bottom Line: Twenty-one studies were selected for critical appraisal.Muscle activity tends to be lower in water-based compared to land-based activity; however more research is needed to understand why.Approaches from basic and applied sciences could support the understanding of relevant aspects for clinical practice.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Background: Aquatic exercise has been widely used for rehabilitation and functional recovery due to its physical and physiological benefits. However, there is a high variability in reporting on the muscle activity from surface electromyographic (sEMG) signals. The aim of this study is to present an updated review of the literature on the state of the art of muscle activity recorded using sEMG during activities and exercise performed by humans in water.

Methods: A literature search was performed to identify studies of aquatic exercise movement.

Results: Twenty-one studies were selected for critical appraisal. Sample size, functional tasks analyzed, and muscles recorded were studied for each paper. The clinical contribution of the paper was evaluated.

Conclusions: Muscle activity tends to be lower in water-based compared to land-based activity; however more research is needed to understand why. Approaches from basic and applied sciences could support the understanding of relevant aspects for clinical practice.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Flow-chart displaying selection of studies.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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Figure 1: Flow-chart displaying selection of studies.

Mentions: Three hundred sixteen articles were found in electronic search and one hundred thirty two were examined after selection based on the title and abstract. Forty-two relevant articles were found in the main databases. Twenty-four original subsequent studies were examined after selection based on reading full text and 15 were excluded for not achieving the necessary criteria [FigureĀ 1]. There were no irresolvable disagreements between authors. All 9 studies scored greater than five. This CASPe tool has not been an elimination criterion. The studies included in this review share common threats to validity as most studies score negatively in the same areas.


Surface electromyography during physical exercise in water: a systematic review.

Cuesta-Vargas AI, Cano-Herrera CL - BMC Sports Sci Med Rehabil (2014)

Flow-chart displaying selection of studies.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4129181&req=5

Figure 1: Flow-chart displaying selection of studies.
Mentions: Three hundred sixteen articles were found in electronic search and one hundred thirty two were examined after selection based on the title and abstract. Forty-two relevant articles were found in the main databases. Twenty-four original subsequent studies were examined after selection based on reading full text and 15 were excluded for not achieving the necessary criteria [FigureĀ 1]. There were no irresolvable disagreements between authors. All 9 studies scored greater than five. This CASPe tool has not been an elimination criterion. The studies included in this review share common threats to validity as most studies score negatively in the same areas.

Bottom Line: Twenty-one studies were selected for critical appraisal.Muscle activity tends to be lower in water-based compared to land-based activity; however more research is needed to understand why.Approaches from basic and applied sciences could support the understanding of relevant aspects for clinical practice.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Background: Aquatic exercise has been widely used for rehabilitation and functional recovery due to its physical and physiological benefits. However, there is a high variability in reporting on the muscle activity from surface electromyographic (sEMG) signals. The aim of this study is to present an updated review of the literature on the state of the art of muscle activity recorded using sEMG during activities and exercise performed by humans in water.

Methods: A literature search was performed to identify studies of aquatic exercise movement.

Results: Twenty-one studies were selected for critical appraisal. Sample size, functional tasks analyzed, and muscles recorded were studied for each paper. The clinical contribution of the paper was evaluated.

Conclusions: Muscle activity tends to be lower in water-based compared to land-based activity; however more research is needed to understand why. Approaches from basic and applied sciences could support the understanding of relevant aspects for clinical practice.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus