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Voice prosthetic biofilm formation and Candida morphogenic conversions in absence and presence of different bacterial strains and species on silicone-rubber.

van der Mei HC, Buijssen KJ, van der Laan BF, Ovchinnikova E, Geertsema-Doornbusch GI, Atema-Smit J, van de Belt-Gritter B, Busscher HJ - PLoS ONE (2014)

Bottom Line: Biofilms were grown during eight days in a silicone-rubber tube, while passing the biofilms through episodes of nutritional feast and famine.High percentages of Candida were found in biofilms grown in combination with lactobacilli.Interestingly, L. casei, with demonstrated favorable effects on the clinical life-time of voice prostheses, reduced the percentage hyphal formation in Candida biofilms as compared with Candida biofilms grown in absence of bacteria or grown in combination with R. dentocariosa, a bacterial strain whose presence is associated with short clinical life-times of voice prostheses.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University of Groningen and University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Groningen, the Netherlands.

ABSTRACT
Morphogenic conversion of Candida from a yeast to hyphal morphology plays a pivotal role in the pathogenicity of Candida species. Both Candida albicans and Candida tropicalis, in combination with a variety of different bacterial strains and species, appear in biofilms on silicone-rubber voice prostheses used in laryngectomized patients. Here we study biofilm formation on silicone-rubber by C. albicans or C. tropicalis in combination with different commensal bacterial strains and lactobacillus strains. In addition, hyphal formation in C. albicans and C. tropicalis, as stimulated by Rothia dentocariosa and lactobacilli was evaluated, as clinical studies outlined that these bacterial strains have opposite results on the clinical life-time of silicone-rubber voice prostheses. Biofilms were grown during eight days in a silicone-rubber tube, while passing the biofilms through episodes of nutritional feast and famine. Biofilms consisting of combinations of C. albicans and a bacterial strain comprised significantly less viable organisms than combinations comprising C. tropicalis. High percentages of Candida were found in biofilms grown in combination with lactobacilli. Interestingly, L. casei, with demonstrated favorable effects on the clinical life-time of voice prostheses, reduced the percentage hyphal formation in Candida biofilms as compared with Candida biofilms grown in absence of bacteria or grown in combination with R. dentocariosa, a bacterial strain whose presence is associated with short clinical life-times of voice prostheses.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Restoration of voice after total laryngectomy using a tracheostoma valve.Schematic drawing of voice restoration after laryngectomy using a tracheostoma (left) and SEM of a mixed species (yeast and bacteria) biofilm formation on the tracheostoma valve after insertion for 40 days into a patient (right, bar marker indicates 600 µm). Taken with permission from [7].
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pone-0104508-g001: Restoration of voice after total laryngectomy using a tracheostoma valve.Schematic drawing of voice restoration after laryngectomy using a tracheostoma (left) and SEM of a mixed species (yeast and bacteria) biofilm formation on the tracheostoma valve after insertion for 40 days into a patient (right, bar marker indicates 600 µm). Taken with permission from [7].

Mentions: Verbal communication in patients after laryngectomy can be restored (Figure 1) by placing a silicone-rubber voice prosthesis into a surgically created puncture between the trachea and esophagus [1]. By closing the stoma with a finger, air from the lungs can be forced through the silicone-rubber valve to produce tissue vibration and accompanying voice. In the non-sterile environment of the esophagus, valves sides of voice prostheses become rapidly colonized by microorganisms, leading to increased airflow resistance or leakage of food and liquid [2], which results in frequent replacements of prostheses. Candida albicans and Candida tropicalis are regarded as the main fungal species in voice prosthetic biofilms, and seldom exist alone in a biofilm. Next to Candida species, several other bacterial members of the commensal oral and skin flora of the host have been detected in voice prosthetic biofilms [1], [3], mainly comprising streptococci, staphylococci and lactobacilli. Clearly, these commensal have easy access to prosthesis site. Recently it was shown that the diversity (i.e. number of bacterial species detected) of pathogens detected on voice prostheses correlated positively with the diversity of pathogens in the oral cavity [4].


Voice prosthetic biofilm formation and Candida morphogenic conversions in absence and presence of different bacterial strains and species on silicone-rubber.

van der Mei HC, Buijssen KJ, van der Laan BF, Ovchinnikova E, Geertsema-Doornbusch GI, Atema-Smit J, van de Belt-Gritter B, Busscher HJ - PLoS ONE (2014)

Restoration of voice after total laryngectomy using a tracheostoma valve.Schematic drawing of voice restoration after laryngectomy using a tracheostoma (left) and SEM of a mixed species (yeast and bacteria) biofilm formation on the tracheostoma valve after insertion for 40 days into a patient (right, bar marker indicates 600 µm). Taken with permission from [7].
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4128802&req=5

pone-0104508-g001: Restoration of voice after total laryngectomy using a tracheostoma valve.Schematic drawing of voice restoration after laryngectomy using a tracheostoma (left) and SEM of a mixed species (yeast and bacteria) biofilm formation on the tracheostoma valve after insertion for 40 days into a patient (right, bar marker indicates 600 µm). Taken with permission from [7].
Mentions: Verbal communication in patients after laryngectomy can be restored (Figure 1) by placing a silicone-rubber voice prosthesis into a surgically created puncture between the trachea and esophagus [1]. By closing the stoma with a finger, air from the lungs can be forced through the silicone-rubber valve to produce tissue vibration and accompanying voice. In the non-sterile environment of the esophagus, valves sides of voice prostheses become rapidly colonized by microorganisms, leading to increased airflow resistance or leakage of food and liquid [2], which results in frequent replacements of prostheses. Candida albicans and Candida tropicalis are regarded as the main fungal species in voice prosthetic biofilms, and seldom exist alone in a biofilm. Next to Candida species, several other bacterial members of the commensal oral and skin flora of the host have been detected in voice prosthetic biofilms [1], [3], mainly comprising streptococci, staphylococci and lactobacilli. Clearly, these commensal have easy access to prosthesis site. Recently it was shown that the diversity (i.e. number of bacterial species detected) of pathogens detected on voice prostheses correlated positively with the diversity of pathogens in the oral cavity [4].

Bottom Line: Biofilms were grown during eight days in a silicone-rubber tube, while passing the biofilms through episodes of nutritional feast and famine.High percentages of Candida were found in biofilms grown in combination with lactobacilli.Interestingly, L. casei, with demonstrated favorable effects on the clinical life-time of voice prostheses, reduced the percentage hyphal formation in Candida biofilms as compared with Candida biofilms grown in absence of bacteria or grown in combination with R. dentocariosa, a bacterial strain whose presence is associated with short clinical life-times of voice prostheses.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University of Groningen and University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Groningen, the Netherlands.

ABSTRACT
Morphogenic conversion of Candida from a yeast to hyphal morphology plays a pivotal role in the pathogenicity of Candida species. Both Candida albicans and Candida tropicalis, in combination with a variety of different bacterial strains and species, appear in biofilms on silicone-rubber voice prostheses used in laryngectomized patients. Here we study biofilm formation on silicone-rubber by C. albicans or C. tropicalis in combination with different commensal bacterial strains and lactobacillus strains. In addition, hyphal formation in C. albicans and C. tropicalis, as stimulated by Rothia dentocariosa and lactobacilli was evaluated, as clinical studies outlined that these bacterial strains have opposite results on the clinical life-time of silicone-rubber voice prostheses. Biofilms were grown during eight days in a silicone-rubber tube, while passing the biofilms through episodes of nutritional feast and famine. Biofilms consisting of combinations of C. albicans and a bacterial strain comprised significantly less viable organisms than combinations comprising C. tropicalis. High percentages of Candida were found in biofilms grown in combination with lactobacilli. Interestingly, L. casei, with demonstrated favorable effects on the clinical life-time of voice prostheses, reduced the percentage hyphal formation in Candida biofilms as compared with Candida biofilms grown in absence of bacteria or grown in combination with R. dentocariosa, a bacterial strain whose presence is associated with short clinical life-times of voice prostheses.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus