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Age as a risk factor for acute mountain sickness upon rapid ascent to 3,700 m among young adult Chinese men.

Tang XG, Zhang JH, Qin J, Gao XB, Li QN, Yu J, Ding XH, Huang L - Clin Interv Aging (2014)

Bottom Line: The opposite trend was observed for SaO2.At 3,700 m, the prevalence of AMS increased with age, as did severe AMS, and AMS symptoms (except gastrointestinal symptoms).Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that age was a risk factor for AMS (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 1.07, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.01-1.13, P<0.05), as well as AISS (adjusted OR 1.39, 95% CI 1.28-1.51, P<0.001).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Cardiovascular Diseases, Chongqing, People's Republic of China.

ABSTRACT

Background: The aim of this study was to explore the relationship between age and acute mountain sickness (AMS) when subjects are exposed suddenly to high altitude.

Methods: A total of 856 young adult men were recruited. Before and after acute altitude exposure, the Athens Insomnia Scale score (AISS) was used to evaluate the subjective sleep quality of subjects. AMS was assessed using the Lake Louise scoring system. Heart rate (HR) and arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2) were measured.

Results: Results showed that, at 500 m, AISS and insomnia prevalence were higher in older individuals. After acute exposure to altitude, the HR, AISS, and insomnia prevalence increased sharply, and the increase in older individuals was more marked. The opposite trend was observed for SaO2. At 3,700 m, the prevalence of AMS increased with age, as did severe AMS, and AMS symptoms (except gastrointestinal symptoms). Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that age was a risk factor for AMS (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 1.07, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.01-1.13, P<0.05), as well as AISS (adjusted OR 1.39, 95% CI 1.28-1.51, P<0.001).

Conclusion: The present study is the first to demonstrate that older age is an independent risk factor for AMS upon rapid ascent to high altitude among young adult Chinese men, and pre-existing poor subjective sleep quality may be a contributor to increased AMS prevalence in older subjects.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Comparisons of the prevalence of acute mountain sickness symptoms.Notes: Comparisons were performed with chi-squared tests: *P<0.05, **P<0.01, ***P<0.001.Abbreviations: AMS, acute mountain sickness; DL, dizziness or lightheadedness; DS, difficulty sleeping; GS, gastrointestinal symptoms; WF, weakness or fatigue.
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f1-cia-9-1287: Comparisons of the prevalence of acute mountain sickness symptoms.Notes: Comparisons were performed with chi-squared tests: *P<0.05, **P<0.01, ***P<0.001.Abbreviations: AMS, acute mountain sickness; DL, dizziness or lightheadedness; DS, difficulty sleeping; GS, gastrointestinal symptoms; WF, weakness or fatigue.

Mentions: In terms of AMS symptoms, the most common were headache (74.88%), followed by weakness or fatigue (73.36%), dizziness or lightheadedness (73.23%), difficulty sleeping (66.59%), and the prevalence of gastrointestinal symptoms is relatively lower than the prevalence of other AMS symptoms (22.43%). Moreover, the prevalence of AMS symptoms clearly increased with age (Figure 1), and the difference in the prevalence of headache, insomnia, and weakness or fatigue reached statistical significance (P<0.001, P<0.001, and P<0.01, respectively).


Age as a risk factor for acute mountain sickness upon rapid ascent to 3,700 m among young adult Chinese men.

Tang XG, Zhang JH, Qin J, Gao XB, Li QN, Yu J, Ding XH, Huang L - Clin Interv Aging (2014)

Comparisons of the prevalence of acute mountain sickness symptoms.Notes: Comparisons were performed with chi-squared tests: *P<0.05, **P<0.01, ***P<0.001.Abbreviations: AMS, acute mountain sickness; DL, dizziness or lightheadedness; DS, difficulty sleeping; GS, gastrointestinal symptoms; WF, weakness or fatigue.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4128797&req=5

f1-cia-9-1287: Comparisons of the prevalence of acute mountain sickness symptoms.Notes: Comparisons were performed with chi-squared tests: *P<0.05, **P<0.01, ***P<0.001.Abbreviations: AMS, acute mountain sickness; DL, dizziness or lightheadedness; DS, difficulty sleeping; GS, gastrointestinal symptoms; WF, weakness or fatigue.
Mentions: In terms of AMS symptoms, the most common were headache (74.88%), followed by weakness or fatigue (73.36%), dizziness or lightheadedness (73.23%), difficulty sleeping (66.59%), and the prevalence of gastrointestinal symptoms is relatively lower than the prevalence of other AMS symptoms (22.43%). Moreover, the prevalence of AMS symptoms clearly increased with age (Figure 1), and the difference in the prevalence of headache, insomnia, and weakness or fatigue reached statistical significance (P<0.001, P<0.001, and P<0.01, respectively).

Bottom Line: The opposite trend was observed for SaO2.At 3,700 m, the prevalence of AMS increased with age, as did severe AMS, and AMS symptoms (except gastrointestinal symptoms).Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that age was a risk factor for AMS (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 1.07, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.01-1.13, P<0.05), as well as AISS (adjusted OR 1.39, 95% CI 1.28-1.51, P<0.001).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Cardiovascular Diseases, Chongqing, People's Republic of China.

ABSTRACT

Background: The aim of this study was to explore the relationship between age and acute mountain sickness (AMS) when subjects are exposed suddenly to high altitude.

Methods: A total of 856 young adult men were recruited. Before and after acute altitude exposure, the Athens Insomnia Scale score (AISS) was used to evaluate the subjective sleep quality of subjects. AMS was assessed using the Lake Louise scoring system. Heart rate (HR) and arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2) were measured.

Results: Results showed that, at 500 m, AISS and insomnia prevalence were higher in older individuals. After acute exposure to altitude, the HR, AISS, and insomnia prevalence increased sharply, and the increase in older individuals was more marked. The opposite trend was observed for SaO2. At 3,700 m, the prevalence of AMS increased with age, as did severe AMS, and AMS symptoms (except gastrointestinal symptoms). Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that age was a risk factor for AMS (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 1.07, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.01-1.13, P<0.05), as well as AISS (adjusted OR 1.39, 95% CI 1.28-1.51, P<0.001).

Conclusion: The present study is the first to demonstrate that older age is an independent risk factor for AMS upon rapid ascent to high altitude among young adult Chinese men, and pre-existing poor subjective sleep quality may be a contributor to increased AMS prevalence in older subjects.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus