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The pathways for intelligible speech: multivariate and univariate perspectives.

Evans S, Kyong JS, Rosen S, Golestani N, Warren JE, McGettigan C, Mourão-Miranda J, Wise RJ, Scott SK - Cereb. Cortex (2013)

Bottom Line: We have demonstrated that the left anterior superior temporal sulcus (STS) responds preferentially to intelligible speech (Scott SK, Blank CC, Rosen S, Wise RJS. 2000.In contrast, in classifications using local "searchlights" and a whole brain analysis, we find greater classification accuracy in posterior rather than anterior temporal regions.Thus, we show that the precise nature of the multivariate analysis used will emphasize different response profiles associated with complex sound to speech processing.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, MRC Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit, Cambridge CB2 7EF, UK.

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Classifier accuracy and weight maps from classifications using the entirety of the bilateral temporal cortex (including PAC) and the inferior occipital gyrus (used as a control region). (Ai) Classifier accuracy (proportion correct) for (clear vs. rot). (Aii) Weight magnitude values of weights from (clear vs. rot). (Bi) Classifier accuracy (proportion correct) for (NV vs. rotNV). (Bii) Weight magnitude values of weights from (NV vs. rotNV). (C) The most discriminative 5%, 10%, and 15% of classifier weights from a classifier trained to discriminate (clear vs. rot). Color gradient indicates the degree of concordance across subjects. (D) The most discriminative 5%, 10%, and 15% of classifier weights from a classifier trained to discriminate (NV vs. rotNV). Color gradient indicates the degree of concordance across subjects. (E) Weights featuring in the top 15% of weight values common to both (clear vs. rot) and (NV vs. rotNV) and more than 4 subjects.
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BHT083F6: Classifier accuracy and weight maps from classifications using the entirety of the bilateral temporal cortex (including PAC) and the inferior occipital gyrus (used as a control region). (Ai) Classifier accuracy (proportion correct) for (clear vs. rot). (Aii) Weight magnitude values of weights from (clear vs. rot). (Bi) Classifier accuracy (proportion correct) for (NV vs. rotNV). (Bii) Weight magnitude values of weights from (NV vs. rotNV). (C) The most discriminative 5%, 10%, and 15% of classifier weights from a classifier trained to discriminate (clear vs. rot). Color gradient indicates the degree of concordance across subjects. (D) The most discriminative 5%, 10%, and 15% of classifier weights from a classifier trained to discriminate (NV vs. rotNV). Color gradient indicates the degree of concordance across subjects. (E) Weights featuring in the top 15% of weight values common to both (clear vs. rot) and (NV vs. rotNV) and more than 4 subjects.

Mentions: Classification was conducted using an ROI consisting of the entire bilateral temporal cortex, including PAC and a control region, the inferior occipital gyrus. Cross validation using the run structure demonstrated that this ROI correctly classified 0.74 (proportion correct) of volumes of (clear vs. rot), and 0.79 of volumes of (NV vs. rotNV) correctly (chance level 0.50; Fig. 6Ai,Bi); and in both cases, classification was significantly greater than chance (clear vs. rot: t(11) = 5.961, P < 0.001; NV vs. rotNV: t(11) = 9.949, P < 0.001) when Bonferroni correcting for 2 tests (P = 0.025). There was no evidence that the inferior occipital gyrus performed at a level greater than chance (clear vs. rot: P = 0.812; NV vs. rotNV: P = 0.967). Having demonstrated above-chance classification using the bilateral temporal cortex in both intelligibility classifications, we extracted the weight vector from a classifier trained using both runs of data for each intelligibility classification.Figure 6.


The pathways for intelligible speech: multivariate and univariate perspectives.

Evans S, Kyong JS, Rosen S, Golestani N, Warren JE, McGettigan C, Mourão-Miranda J, Wise RJ, Scott SK - Cereb. Cortex (2013)

Classifier accuracy and weight maps from classifications using the entirety of the bilateral temporal cortex (including PAC) and the inferior occipital gyrus (used as a control region). (Ai) Classifier accuracy (proportion correct) for (clear vs. rot). (Aii) Weight magnitude values of weights from (clear vs. rot). (Bi) Classifier accuracy (proportion correct) for (NV vs. rotNV). (Bii) Weight magnitude values of weights from (NV vs. rotNV). (C) The most discriminative 5%, 10%, and 15% of classifier weights from a classifier trained to discriminate (clear vs. rot). Color gradient indicates the degree of concordance across subjects. (D) The most discriminative 5%, 10%, and 15% of classifier weights from a classifier trained to discriminate (NV vs. rotNV). Color gradient indicates the degree of concordance across subjects. (E) Weights featuring in the top 15% of weight values common to both (clear vs. rot) and (NV vs. rotNV) and more than 4 subjects.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4128702&req=5

BHT083F6: Classifier accuracy and weight maps from classifications using the entirety of the bilateral temporal cortex (including PAC) and the inferior occipital gyrus (used as a control region). (Ai) Classifier accuracy (proportion correct) for (clear vs. rot). (Aii) Weight magnitude values of weights from (clear vs. rot). (Bi) Classifier accuracy (proportion correct) for (NV vs. rotNV). (Bii) Weight magnitude values of weights from (NV vs. rotNV). (C) The most discriminative 5%, 10%, and 15% of classifier weights from a classifier trained to discriminate (clear vs. rot). Color gradient indicates the degree of concordance across subjects. (D) The most discriminative 5%, 10%, and 15% of classifier weights from a classifier trained to discriminate (NV vs. rotNV). Color gradient indicates the degree of concordance across subjects. (E) Weights featuring in the top 15% of weight values common to both (clear vs. rot) and (NV vs. rotNV) and more than 4 subjects.
Mentions: Classification was conducted using an ROI consisting of the entire bilateral temporal cortex, including PAC and a control region, the inferior occipital gyrus. Cross validation using the run structure demonstrated that this ROI correctly classified 0.74 (proportion correct) of volumes of (clear vs. rot), and 0.79 of volumes of (NV vs. rotNV) correctly (chance level 0.50; Fig. 6Ai,Bi); and in both cases, classification was significantly greater than chance (clear vs. rot: t(11) = 5.961, P < 0.001; NV vs. rotNV: t(11) = 9.949, P < 0.001) when Bonferroni correcting for 2 tests (P = 0.025). There was no evidence that the inferior occipital gyrus performed at a level greater than chance (clear vs. rot: P = 0.812; NV vs. rotNV: P = 0.967). Having demonstrated above-chance classification using the bilateral temporal cortex in both intelligibility classifications, we extracted the weight vector from a classifier trained using both runs of data for each intelligibility classification.Figure 6.

Bottom Line: We have demonstrated that the left anterior superior temporal sulcus (STS) responds preferentially to intelligible speech (Scott SK, Blank CC, Rosen S, Wise RJS. 2000.In contrast, in classifications using local "searchlights" and a whole brain analysis, we find greater classification accuracy in posterior rather than anterior temporal regions.Thus, we show that the precise nature of the multivariate analysis used will emphasize different response profiles associated with complex sound to speech processing.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, MRC Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit, Cambridge CB2 7EF, UK.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus