Limits...
Structural and functional aspects relating to cost and benefit of rich club organization in the human cerebral cortex.

Collin G, Sporns O, Mandl RC, van den Heuvel MP - Cereb. Cortex (2013)

Bottom Line: Recent findings have demonstrated that a small set of highly connected brain regions may play a central role in enabling efficient communication between cortical regions, together forming a densely interconnected "rich club." However, the density and spatial layout of the rich club also suggest that it constitutes a costly feature of brain architecture.Our findings suggest that rich club regions and rich club connections exhibit high levels of wiring volume, high levels of white matter organization, high levels of metabolic energy usage, long maturational trajectories, more variable regional time series, and more inter-regional functional couplings.The high cost of the rich club may, however, be offset by significant functional benefits that the rich club confers to the brain network as a whole.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychiatry, University Medical Center Utrecht, Rudolf Magnus Institute of Neuroscience, Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Structural and functional aspects of rich club and non-rich club nodes. (A) Left bar graph shows the class-average levels of cortical thickness (corrected for differences in regional volume). Right bar graph shows the number of positive (Tfc > 0) functional connections of rich club and non-rich club nodes, showing that the number of functional connections of rich club nodes was significantly higher than that of non-rich club nodes. Error bars express variation of node class values over the group of subjects. (B) Bar graphs show the mean values of the class of rich club nodes and non-rich club nodes of the aerobic glycolysis index as taken from (Vaishnavi et al. 2011) and the maturational index as taken from (Glasser and Van Essen 2011). Data shows that rich club nodes display a significantly higher metabolic energy use as compared to non-rich club nodes, and a significantly longer maturational trajectory than non-rich club nodes. *P < 0.05 (permutation testing, 10 000 permutations). Error bars express variation of values over the group of included regions.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4128699&req=5

BHT064F2: Structural and functional aspects of rich club and non-rich club nodes. (A) Left bar graph shows the class-average levels of cortical thickness (corrected for differences in regional volume). Right bar graph shows the number of positive (Tfc > 0) functional connections of rich club and non-rich club nodes, showing that the number of functional connections of rich club nodes was significantly higher than that of non-rich club nodes. Error bars express variation of node class values over the group of subjects. (B) Bar graphs show the mean values of the class of rich club nodes and non-rich club nodes of the aerobic glycolysis index as taken from (Vaishnavi et al. 2011) and the maturational index as taken from (Glasser and Van Essen 2011). Data shows that rich club nodes display a significantly higher metabolic energy use as compared to non-rich club nodes, and a significantly longer maturational trajectory than non-rich club nodes. *P < 0.05 (permutation testing, 10 000 permutations). Error bars express variation of values over the group of included regions.

Mentions: No difference was found in CT between rich club and non-rich club nodes (mean/std rich club: 2.606/0.082, non-rich club 2.595/0.090, P = 0.869) (Fig. 2). Correcting for differences in overall volume of brain regions (regressing out the effect of regional volume on the level of regional CT within each dataset) revealed a significantly higher CT of rich club regions as compared to non-rich club regions (mean/std rich club: 2.67/0.091, non-rich club 2.58/0.081, P = 0.0012).Figure 2.


Structural and functional aspects relating to cost and benefit of rich club organization in the human cerebral cortex.

Collin G, Sporns O, Mandl RC, van den Heuvel MP - Cereb. Cortex (2013)

Structural and functional aspects of rich club and non-rich club nodes. (A) Left bar graph shows the class-average levels of cortical thickness (corrected for differences in regional volume). Right bar graph shows the number of positive (Tfc > 0) functional connections of rich club and non-rich club nodes, showing that the number of functional connections of rich club nodes was significantly higher than that of non-rich club nodes. Error bars express variation of node class values over the group of subjects. (B) Bar graphs show the mean values of the class of rich club nodes and non-rich club nodes of the aerobic glycolysis index as taken from (Vaishnavi et al. 2011) and the maturational index as taken from (Glasser and Van Essen 2011). Data shows that rich club nodes display a significantly higher metabolic energy use as compared to non-rich club nodes, and a significantly longer maturational trajectory than non-rich club nodes. *P < 0.05 (permutation testing, 10 000 permutations). Error bars express variation of values over the group of included regions.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4128699&req=5

BHT064F2: Structural and functional aspects of rich club and non-rich club nodes. (A) Left bar graph shows the class-average levels of cortical thickness (corrected for differences in regional volume). Right bar graph shows the number of positive (Tfc > 0) functional connections of rich club and non-rich club nodes, showing that the number of functional connections of rich club nodes was significantly higher than that of non-rich club nodes. Error bars express variation of node class values over the group of subjects. (B) Bar graphs show the mean values of the class of rich club nodes and non-rich club nodes of the aerobic glycolysis index as taken from (Vaishnavi et al. 2011) and the maturational index as taken from (Glasser and Van Essen 2011). Data shows that rich club nodes display a significantly higher metabolic energy use as compared to non-rich club nodes, and a significantly longer maturational trajectory than non-rich club nodes. *P < 0.05 (permutation testing, 10 000 permutations). Error bars express variation of values over the group of included regions.
Mentions: No difference was found in CT between rich club and non-rich club nodes (mean/std rich club: 2.606/0.082, non-rich club 2.595/0.090, P = 0.869) (Fig. 2). Correcting for differences in overall volume of brain regions (regressing out the effect of regional volume on the level of regional CT within each dataset) revealed a significantly higher CT of rich club regions as compared to non-rich club regions (mean/std rich club: 2.67/0.091, non-rich club 2.58/0.081, P = 0.0012).Figure 2.

Bottom Line: Recent findings have demonstrated that a small set of highly connected brain regions may play a central role in enabling efficient communication between cortical regions, together forming a densely interconnected "rich club." However, the density and spatial layout of the rich club also suggest that it constitutes a costly feature of brain architecture.Our findings suggest that rich club regions and rich club connections exhibit high levels of wiring volume, high levels of white matter organization, high levels of metabolic energy usage, long maturational trajectories, more variable regional time series, and more inter-regional functional couplings.The high cost of the rich club may, however, be offset by significant functional benefits that the rich club confers to the brain network as a whole.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychiatry, University Medical Center Utrecht, Rudolf Magnus Institute of Neuroscience, Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus