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Evaluating an Integrative Theoretical Framework for HIV Sexual Risk among Juvenile Justice involved Adolescents.

Magnan RE, Callahan TJ, Ladd BO, Claus ED, Hutchison KE, Bryan AD - J AIDS Clin Res (2013)

Bottom Line: Given the strong connection between alcohol use and risky sex in this population, it is important to consider alcohol use in interventions designed to decrease risky sexual behavior.This paper provides support for an integrative translational model that incorporates psychosocial, neurobiological, and genetic factors to better predict alcohol-related sexual risk behavior.Preliminary data suggest that interventions among justice-involved adolescents targeting alcohol-related sexual risk behavior may be more effective if a biopsychosocial approach is considered.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, Washington State University Vancouver, USA.

ABSTRACT
Juvenile justice involved youth are at great risk for negative outcomes of risky sexual behavior including HIV/AIDS. Given the strong connection between alcohol use and risky sex in this population, it is important to consider alcohol use in interventions designed to decrease risky sexual behavior. This paper provides support for an integrative translational model that incorporates psychosocial, neurobiological, and genetic factors to better predict alcohol-related sexual risk behavior. Specifically, we present the design, methods, and baseline data from a complex randomized control trial, Project SHARP (Sexual Health and Adolescent Risk Prevention) in order to illustrate how this broad array of factors can best predict alcohol-related sexual risk behavior. Participants were justice-involved adolescents (n=284) who completed an fMRI and self-report assessments prior to randomization to either a sexual risk plus alcohol risk reduction group intervention or to an information-only contact control group intervention. Structural equation modeling was utilized and findings supported the hypothesized relationships in the translational model. Preliminary data suggest that interventions among justice-involved adolescents targeting alcohol-related sexual risk behavior may be more effective if a biopsychosocial approach is considered.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Project SHARP Retention Rates.Note. Any participant lost to follow-up was due to not being able to contact the participant.
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Figure 1: Project SHARP Retention Rates.Note. Any participant lost to follow-up was due to not being able to contact the participant.

Mentions: Five hundred and sixty-six adolescents were recruited; 282 were dropped, withdrew, or the parent/guardian refused consent. A total of 284 individuals (205 male; 79 female) completed the baseline assessments; 269 were randomly assigned to an intervention condition (GINFO=137, GPI+GMET=132). We compared the two intervention groups on baseline characteristics (e.g., gender, age, individual-difference traits, alcohol and sexual risk behavior, motivation for condom use). Employing a bonferroni correction for alpha inflation (p<.001), no group differences were found across 45 comparisons suggesting randomization was successful (all comparison ps>.10). Retention rates were 85.1%, 86.6%, 86.2%, and 90.7% at the 3-, 6-, 9-, and 12-month follow-ups, respectively (see Figure 1).


Evaluating an Integrative Theoretical Framework for HIV Sexual Risk among Juvenile Justice involved Adolescents.

Magnan RE, Callahan TJ, Ladd BO, Claus ED, Hutchison KE, Bryan AD - J AIDS Clin Res (2013)

Project SHARP Retention Rates.Note. Any participant lost to follow-up was due to not being able to contact the participant.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4128495&req=5

Figure 1: Project SHARP Retention Rates.Note. Any participant lost to follow-up was due to not being able to contact the participant.
Mentions: Five hundred and sixty-six adolescents were recruited; 282 were dropped, withdrew, or the parent/guardian refused consent. A total of 284 individuals (205 male; 79 female) completed the baseline assessments; 269 were randomly assigned to an intervention condition (GINFO=137, GPI+GMET=132). We compared the two intervention groups on baseline characteristics (e.g., gender, age, individual-difference traits, alcohol and sexual risk behavior, motivation for condom use). Employing a bonferroni correction for alpha inflation (p<.001), no group differences were found across 45 comparisons suggesting randomization was successful (all comparison ps>.10). Retention rates were 85.1%, 86.6%, 86.2%, and 90.7% at the 3-, 6-, 9-, and 12-month follow-ups, respectively (see Figure 1).

Bottom Line: Given the strong connection between alcohol use and risky sex in this population, it is important to consider alcohol use in interventions designed to decrease risky sexual behavior.This paper provides support for an integrative translational model that incorporates psychosocial, neurobiological, and genetic factors to better predict alcohol-related sexual risk behavior.Preliminary data suggest that interventions among justice-involved adolescents targeting alcohol-related sexual risk behavior may be more effective if a biopsychosocial approach is considered.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, Washington State University Vancouver, USA.

ABSTRACT
Juvenile justice involved youth are at great risk for negative outcomes of risky sexual behavior including HIV/AIDS. Given the strong connection between alcohol use and risky sex in this population, it is important to consider alcohol use in interventions designed to decrease risky sexual behavior. This paper provides support for an integrative translational model that incorporates psychosocial, neurobiological, and genetic factors to better predict alcohol-related sexual risk behavior. Specifically, we present the design, methods, and baseline data from a complex randomized control trial, Project SHARP (Sexual Health and Adolescent Risk Prevention) in order to illustrate how this broad array of factors can best predict alcohol-related sexual risk behavior. Participants were justice-involved adolescents (n=284) who completed an fMRI and self-report assessments prior to randomization to either a sexual risk plus alcohol risk reduction group intervention or to an information-only contact control group intervention. Structural equation modeling was utilized and findings supported the hypothesized relationships in the translational model. Preliminary data suggest that interventions among justice-involved adolescents targeting alcohol-related sexual risk behavior may be more effective if a biopsychosocial approach is considered.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus