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In vivo mRNA profiling of uropathogenic Escherichia coli from diverse phylogroups reveals common and group-specific gene expression profiles.

Bielecki P, Muthukumarasamy U, Eckweiler D, Bielecka A, Pohl S, Schanz A, Niemeyer U, Oumeraci T, von Neuhoff N, Ghigo JM, Häussler S - MBio (2014)

Bottom Line: Furthermore, genes transcribed in vivo relative to laboratory media included well-described virulence factors, small regulatory RNAs, as well as genes not previously linked to bacterial virulence.Knowledge on relevant transcriptional responses that drive pathogenicity and adaptation of isolates to the human host might lead to the introduction of a virulence typing strategy into clinical microbiology, potentially facilitating management and prevention of the disease.This work was undertaken to identify key players in physiological adaptation processes and, hence, potential targets for new infection prevention and therapy interventions specifically aimed at sabotaging bacterial adaptation to the human host.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute for Molecular Bacteriology, Twincore, Centre for Clinical and Experimental Infection Research, A Joint Venture of the Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research and the Hannover Medical School, Hannover, Germany.

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Clustering of the in vivo transcripts of the 21 UTI isolates based on principal component analysis (PCA). Clustering clearly reflects phylogenetic relatedness as the clinical isolates grouped according to their affiliation to the B2, D, and A/B1 phylogroups.
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fig2: Clustering of the in vivo transcripts of the 21 UTI isolates based on principal component analysis (PCA). Clustering clearly reflects phylogenetic relatedness as the clinical isolates grouped according to their affiliation to the B2, D, and A/B1 phylogroups.

Mentions: Remarkably, clustering of the in vivo transcripts based on principal component analysis (PCA) of the 21 UTI isolates (Fig. 2), including commonly transcribed genes as well as those of the flexible genome, compared very well to that of phylogenetic clustering based on the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) profile (Fig. 1). The expression profile of the 21 UTI samples clustered into three main groups that represented the B2, D, and A/B1 phylogenetic groups. Of note, clustering became even more accurate and well separated when only the expression of genes of the flexible genomes was included in the analysis (data not shown). These results are in agreement with previous reports (37, 38) and clearly demonstrate that the presence of group-specific gene repertoires, and not a difference in overall gene expression profiles, impacts on clustering of the UTI isolates into the phylogroups.


In vivo mRNA profiling of uropathogenic Escherichia coli from diverse phylogroups reveals common and group-specific gene expression profiles.

Bielecki P, Muthukumarasamy U, Eckweiler D, Bielecka A, Pohl S, Schanz A, Niemeyer U, Oumeraci T, von Neuhoff N, Ghigo JM, Häussler S - MBio (2014)

Clustering of the in vivo transcripts of the 21 UTI isolates based on principal component analysis (PCA). Clustering clearly reflects phylogenetic relatedness as the clinical isolates grouped according to their affiliation to the B2, D, and A/B1 phylogroups.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4128348&req=5

fig2: Clustering of the in vivo transcripts of the 21 UTI isolates based on principal component analysis (PCA). Clustering clearly reflects phylogenetic relatedness as the clinical isolates grouped according to their affiliation to the B2, D, and A/B1 phylogroups.
Mentions: Remarkably, clustering of the in vivo transcripts based on principal component analysis (PCA) of the 21 UTI isolates (Fig. 2), including commonly transcribed genes as well as those of the flexible genome, compared very well to that of phylogenetic clustering based on the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) profile (Fig. 1). The expression profile of the 21 UTI samples clustered into three main groups that represented the B2, D, and A/B1 phylogenetic groups. Of note, clustering became even more accurate and well separated when only the expression of genes of the flexible genomes was included in the analysis (data not shown). These results are in agreement with previous reports (37, 38) and clearly demonstrate that the presence of group-specific gene repertoires, and not a difference in overall gene expression profiles, impacts on clustering of the UTI isolates into the phylogroups.

Bottom Line: Furthermore, genes transcribed in vivo relative to laboratory media included well-described virulence factors, small regulatory RNAs, as well as genes not previously linked to bacterial virulence.Knowledge on relevant transcriptional responses that drive pathogenicity and adaptation of isolates to the human host might lead to the introduction of a virulence typing strategy into clinical microbiology, potentially facilitating management and prevention of the disease.This work was undertaken to identify key players in physiological adaptation processes and, hence, potential targets for new infection prevention and therapy interventions specifically aimed at sabotaging bacterial adaptation to the human host.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute for Molecular Bacteriology, Twincore, Centre for Clinical and Experimental Infection Research, A Joint Venture of the Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research and the Hannover Medical School, Hannover, Germany.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus