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Tuning the peak position of subwavelength silica nanosphere broadband antireflection coatings.

Tao F, Hiralal P, Ren L, Wang Y, Dai Q, Amaratunga GA, Zhou H - Nanoscale Res Lett (2014)

Bottom Line: Subwavelength nanostructures are considered as promising building blocks for antireflection and light trapping applications.The tunable optical transmission peaks of the Langmuir-Blodgett films were correlated with deposition parameters such as surface pressure, surfactant concentration, ageing of suspensions and annealing effect.Such peak-tunable broadband antireflection coating has wide applications in diversified industries such as solar cells, windows, displays and lenses.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Electronic and Computer Engineering, Peking University Shenzhen Graduate School, 2199 Lishui Road, Shenzhen, Guangdong 518055, China.

ABSTRACT
Subwavelength nanostructures are considered as promising building blocks for antireflection and light trapping applications. In this study, we demonstrate excellent broadband antireflection effect from thin films of monolayer silica nanospheres with a diameter of 100 nm prepared by Langmuir-Blodgett method on glass substrates. With a single layer of compact silica nanosphere thin film coated on both sides of a glass, we achieved maximum transmittance of 99% at 560 nm. Furthermore, the optical transmission peak of the nanosphere thin films can be tuned over the UV-visible range by changing processing parameters during Langmuir-Blodgett deposition. The tunable optical transmission peaks of the Langmuir-Blodgett films were correlated with deposition parameters such as surface pressure, surfactant concentration, ageing of suspensions and annealing effect. Such peak-tunable broadband antireflection coating has wide applications in diversified industries such as solar cells, windows, displays and lenses.

No MeSH data available.


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Effects on the radius of the nanospheres on the transmission spectra.
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Figure 5: Effects on the radius of the nanospheres on the transmission spectra.

Mentions: The radius of the nanosphere also have pronounced effect on the transmission peaks of the AR layer. When the radius of the spheres are much smaller (<300 nm) than the wavelength of light under concern, the incoming photons will see the surface as an effective medium. However, when the radius of the sphere becomes comparable to the visible wavelength, scattering of light will become significant. Effects on the radius of the nanospheres on the transmission spectra were measured and shown in FigureĀ 5. The small-diameter (65 and 115 nm) silica nanospheres shows excellent AR performance over the visible range, whereas the silica nanospheres with 330-nm diameter lower the overall transmission spectra compared to a plain glass slide. Reports on light cavity enhancement effect are mainly for spheres with diameter at the wavelength scale, such as 600 nm [25,26], where whispering gallery modes in the spheres can be coupled into guided modes in the photoabsorbing layer. Here, in the absence of photoabsorbing layer, the light in the cavities will be re-emitted and being seen as scattering photons. Therefore, the effect of radius of the spheres will change the transmission spectrum of the AR layer on glass substrate, scattering lights with comparable wavelength.


Tuning the peak position of subwavelength silica nanosphere broadband antireflection coatings.

Tao F, Hiralal P, Ren L, Wang Y, Dai Q, Amaratunga GA, Zhou H - Nanoscale Res Lett (2014)

Effects on the radius of the nanospheres on the transmission spectra.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4128290&req=5

Figure 5: Effects on the radius of the nanospheres on the transmission spectra.
Mentions: The radius of the nanosphere also have pronounced effect on the transmission peaks of the AR layer. When the radius of the spheres are much smaller (<300 nm) than the wavelength of light under concern, the incoming photons will see the surface as an effective medium. However, when the radius of the sphere becomes comparable to the visible wavelength, scattering of light will become significant. Effects on the radius of the nanospheres on the transmission spectra were measured and shown in FigureĀ 5. The small-diameter (65 and 115 nm) silica nanospheres shows excellent AR performance over the visible range, whereas the silica nanospheres with 330-nm diameter lower the overall transmission spectra compared to a plain glass slide. Reports on light cavity enhancement effect are mainly for spheres with diameter at the wavelength scale, such as 600 nm [25,26], where whispering gallery modes in the spheres can be coupled into guided modes in the photoabsorbing layer. Here, in the absence of photoabsorbing layer, the light in the cavities will be re-emitted and being seen as scattering photons. Therefore, the effect of radius of the spheres will change the transmission spectrum of the AR layer on glass substrate, scattering lights with comparable wavelength.

Bottom Line: Subwavelength nanostructures are considered as promising building blocks for antireflection and light trapping applications.The tunable optical transmission peaks of the Langmuir-Blodgett films were correlated with deposition parameters such as surface pressure, surfactant concentration, ageing of suspensions and annealing effect.Such peak-tunable broadband antireflection coating has wide applications in diversified industries such as solar cells, windows, displays and lenses.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Electronic and Computer Engineering, Peking University Shenzhen Graduate School, 2199 Lishui Road, Shenzhen, Guangdong 518055, China.

ABSTRACT
Subwavelength nanostructures are considered as promising building blocks for antireflection and light trapping applications. In this study, we demonstrate excellent broadband antireflection effect from thin films of monolayer silica nanospheres with a diameter of 100 nm prepared by Langmuir-Blodgett method on glass substrates. With a single layer of compact silica nanosphere thin film coated on both sides of a glass, we achieved maximum transmittance of 99% at 560 nm. Furthermore, the optical transmission peak of the nanosphere thin films can be tuned over the UV-visible range by changing processing parameters during Langmuir-Blodgett deposition. The tunable optical transmission peaks of the Langmuir-Blodgett films were correlated with deposition parameters such as surface pressure, surfactant concentration, ageing of suspensions and annealing effect. Such peak-tunable broadband antireflection coating has wide applications in diversified industries such as solar cells, windows, displays and lenses.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus