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Tuning the peak position of subwavelength silica nanosphere broadband antireflection coatings.

Tao F, Hiralal P, Ren L, Wang Y, Dai Q, Amaratunga GA, Zhou H - Nanoscale Res Lett (2014)

Bottom Line: Subwavelength nanostructures are considered as promising building blocks for antireflection and light trapping applications.The tunable optical transmission peaks of the Langmuir-Blodgett films were correlated with deposition parameters such as surface pressure, surfactant concentration, ageing of suspensions and annealing effect.Such peak-tunable broadband antireflection coating has wide applications in diversified industries such as solar cells, windows, displays and lenses.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Electronic and Computer Engineering, Peking University Shenzhen Graduate School, 2199 Lishui Road, Shenzhen, Guangdong 518055, China.

ABSTRACT
Subwavelength nanostructures are considered as promising building blocks for antireflection and light trapping applications. In this study, we demonstrate excellent broadband antireflection effect from thin films of monolayer silica nanospheres with a diameter of 100 nm prepared by Langmuir-Blodgett method on glass substrates. With a single layer of compact silica nanosphere thin film coated on both sides of a glass, we achieved maximum transmittance of 99% at 560 nm. Furthermore, the optical transmission peak of the nanosphere thin films can be tuned over the UV-visible range by changing processing parameters during Langmuir-Blodgett deposition. The tunable optical transmission peaks of the Langmuir-Blodgett films were correlated with deposition parameters such as surface pressure, surfactant concentration, ageing of suspensions and annealing effect. Such peak-tunable broadband antireflection coating has wide applications in diversified industries such as solar cells, windows, displays and lenses.

No MeSH data available.


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Transmission spectra of bare glass, single AR and double AR. (a)  Experimental results. (b) Simulated results.
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Figure 2: Transmission spectra of bare glass, single AR and double AR. (a) Experimental results. (b) Simulated results.

Mentions: The AR effects of single-side and double-side silica nanosphere coating were further confirmed by measuring transmission spectra of the samples. Transmission spectra of bare glass, single AR and double AR are shown in Figure 2a. Transmittance of bare glass was around 92% over the whole visible spectrum. Single-side AR-coated glass had higher transmittance than that of the bare glass with a peak value of approximately 95% at 560 nm. The double-side AR-coated glass had the highest transmittance, with a peak of approximately 99% at 560 nm. These experimental results are consistent with previous reports [4,9]. The 560-nm transmission peak on the AR-coated glasses is the main cause of the disappearance of the reflected images as the maximum spectral sensitivity of human eyes is at approximately 555 nm. FDTD simulation was used to verify the AR effects of silica nanosphere coating. Simulated transmission spectra are shown in Figure 2b. The general trend of the simulated curve matches our experimental data, though there are some mismatch probably due to the material index used in the model which are not identical to the real situation. Both experiments and simulation confirmed that thin films composing subwavelength silica nanospheres have superior antireflection effect on the interface between air and planar glass and that each optically abrupt interface should be taken into account in order to obtain the best antireflection performance.


Tuning the peak position of subwavelength silica nanosphere broadband antireflection coatings.

Tao F, Hiralal P, Ren L, Wang Y, Dai Q, Amaratunga GA, Zhou H - Nanoscale Res Lett (2014)

Transmission spectra of bare glass, single AR and double AR. (a)  Experimental results. (b) Simulated results.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4128290&req=5

Figure 2: Transmission spectra of bare glass, single AR and double AR. (a) Experimental results. (b) Simulated results.
Mentions: The AR effects of single-side and double-side silica nanosphere coating were further confirmed by measuring transmission spectra of the samples. Transmission spectra of bare glass, single AR and double AR are shown in Figure 2a. Transmittance of bare glass was around 92% over the whole visible spectrum. Single-side AR-coated glass had higher transmittance than that of the bare glass with a peak value of approximately 95% at 560 nm. The double-side AR-coated glass had the highest transmittance, with a peak of approximately 99% at 560 nm. These experimental results are consistent with previous reports [4,9]. The 560-nm transmission peak on the AR-coated glasses is the main cause of the disappearance of the reflected images as the maximum spectral sensitivity of human eyes is at approximately 555 nm. FDTD simulation was used to verify the AR effects of silica nanosphere coating. Simulated transmission spectra are shown in Figure 2b. The general trend of the simulated curve matches our experimental data, though there are some mismatch probably due to the material index used in the model which are not identical to the real situation. Both experiments and simulation confirmed that thin films composing subwavelength silica nanospheres have superior antireflection effect on the interface between air and planar glass and that each optically abrupt interface should be taken into account in order to obtain the best antireflection performance.

Bottom Line: Subwavelength nanostructures are considered as promising building blocks for antireflection and light trapping applications.The tunable optical transmission peaks of the Langmuir-Blodgett films were correlated with deposition parameters such as surface pressure, surfactant concentration, ageing of suspensions and annealing effect.Such peak-tunable broadband antireflection coating has wide applications in diversified industries such as solar cells, windows, displays and lenses.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Electronic and Computer Engineering, Peking University Shenzhen Graduate School, 2199 Lishui Road, Shenzhen, Guangdong 518055, China.

ABSTRACT
Subwavelength nanostructures are considered as promising building blocks for antireflection and light trapping applications. In this study, we demonstrate excellent broadband antireflection effect from thin films of monolayer silica nanospheres with a diameter of 100 nm prepared by Langmuir-Blodgett method on glass substrates. With a single layer of compact silica nanosphere thin film coated on both sides of a glass, we achieved maximum transmittance of 99% at 560 nm. Furthermore, the optical transmission peak of the nanosphere thin films can be tuned over the UV-visible range by changing processing parameters during Langmuir-Blodgett deposition. The tunable optical transmission peaks of the Langmuir-Blodgett films were correlated with deposition parameters such as surface pressure, surfactant concentration, ageing of suspensions and annealing effect. Such peak-tunable broadband antireflection coating has wide applications in diversified industries such as solar cells, windows, displays and lenses.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus