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Relationship between working memory performance and neural activation measured using near-infrared spectroscopy.

Ogawa Y, Kotani K, Jimbo Y - Brain Behav (2014)

Bottom Line: NIRS activation in all channels correlated with WM performance (P < 0.05).There was a statistically significant difference (P < 0.05) in seven channels between NIRS amplitude in correct- and incorrect-WM tasks.NIRS activation of the delay time averaged with only correct-WM tasks, correlated with WM performance in six channels (P < 0.05).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Graduate School of Frontier Science, The University of Tokyo Chiba, Japan.

ABSTRACT

Background: Working memory (WM) is a key function for various cognitive processes. Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is a powerful technique for noninvasive functional imaging. However, a study has yet to be published on the application of NIRS for evaluating WM performance. The objective was to evaluate NIRS for measuring WM performance.

Methods: Subjects were trained to perform a visuospatial WM task. Eight channels on the lateral prefrontal cortex were analyzed. We asked the following three questions: (1) Does WM performance correlate with NIRS signal amplitudes? (2) What are the differences in NIRS amplitudes between correct- and incorrect-WM tasks? (3) Is there a correlation between WM performance and NIRS amplitudes in only correct-WM tasks?

Results: NIRS activation in all channels correlated with WM performance (P < 0.05). There was a statistically significant difference (P < 0.05) in seven channels between NIRS amplitude in correct- and incorrect-WM tasks. NIRS activation of the delay time averaged with only correct-WM tasks, correlated with WM performance in six channels (P < 0.05).

Conclusions: Subjects with better WM performance have higher levels of oxyhemoglobin activation compared with control trials in the WM delay time, and our results suggest that NIRS will be useful for measuring the WM performance.

Show MeSH
Oxygenated hemoglobin (oxy-Hb) time-series data for correct-working memory (WM) task, incorrect-WM task, and control measured in channel 17 (average of all subjects). The left shaded column (5–7 sec) indicates the stimulus timing, the right shaded column (7–11 sec) indicates the delay time, and the black bar on the x-axis indicates the task period.
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fig04: Oxygenated hemoglobin (oxy-Hb) time-series data for correct-working memory (WM) task, incorrect-WM task, and control measured in channel 17 (average of all subjects). The left shaded column (5–7 sec) indicates the stimulus timing, the right shaded column (7–11 sec) indicates the delay time, and the black bar on the x-axis indicates the task period.

Mentions: Differences between oxy-Hb levels in correct- and incorrect-WM tasks were analyzed. Figure 4 shows the oxy-Hb time-series data of channel 17, averaged among subjects. Black and gray lines indicate the change for the correct- and incorrect-WM tasks, respectively, and the dotted line indicates the control task. There were no statistically significant differences (P < 0.05) in the stimulus timing for all channels after the correction of multiple comparisons. In contrast, there were statistically significant differences (P < 0.05) in seven channels (10, 13, 14, 17–19, and 22) after the correction of multiple comparisons (Fig. 5). These results indicate that changes in oxy-Hb levels detected for correct-WM were higher than those of incorrect-WM task in delay time.


Relationship between working memory performance and neural activation measured using near-infrared spectroscopy.

Ogawa Y, Kotani K, Jimbo Y - Brain Behav (2014)

Oxygenated hemoglobin (oxy-Hb) time-series data for correct-working memory (WM) task, incorrect-WM task, and control measured in channel 17 (average of all subjects). The left shaded column (5–7 sec) indicates the stimulus timing, the right shaded column (7–11 sec) indicates the delay time, and the black bar on the x-axis indicates the task period.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4128036&req=5

fig04: Oxygenated hemoglobin (oxy-Hb) time-series data for correct-working memory (WM) task, incorrect-WM task, and control measured in channel 17 (average of all subjects). The left shaded column (5–7 sec) indicates the stimulus timing, the right shaded column (7–11 sec) indicates the delay time, and the black bar on the x-axis indicates the task period.
Mentions: Differences between oxy-Hb levels in correct- and incorrect-WM tasks were analyzed. Figure 4 shows the oxy-Hb time-series data of channel 17, averaged among subjects. Black and gray lines indicate the change for the correct- and incorrect-WM tasks, respectively, and the dotted line indicates the control task. There were no statistically significant differences (P < 0.05) in the stimulus timing for all channels after the correction of multiple comparisons. In contrast, there were statistically significant differences (P < 0.05) in seven channels (10, 13, 14, 17–19, and 22) after the correction of multiple comparisons (Fig. 5). These results indicate that changes in oxy-Hb levels detected for correct-WM were higher than those of incorrect-WM task in delay time.

Bottom Line: NIRS activation in all channels correlated with WM performance (P < 0.05).There was a statistically significant difference (P < 0.05) in seven channels between NIRS amplitude in correct- and incorrect-WM tasks.NIRS activation of the delay time averaged with only correct-WM tasks, correlated with WM performance in six channels (P < 0.05).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Graduate School of Frontier Science, The University of Tokyo Chiba, Japan.

ABSTRACT

Background: Working memory (WM) is a key function for various cognitive processes. Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is a powerful technique for noninvasive functional imaging. However, a study has yet to be published on the application of NIRS for evaluating WM performance. The objective was to evaluate NIRS for measuring WM performance.

Methods: Subjects were trained to perform a visuospatial WM task. Eight channels on the lateral prefrontal cortex were analyzed. We asked the following three questions: (1) Does WM performance correlate with NIRS signal amplitudes? (2) What are the differences in NIRS amplitudes between correct- and incorrect-WM tasks? (3) Is there a correlation between WM performance and NIRS amplitudes in only correct-WM tasks?

Results: NIRS activation in all channels correlated with WM performance (P < 0.05). There was a statistically significant difference (P < 0.05) in seven channels between NIRS amplitude in correct- and incorrect-WM tasks. NIRS activation of the delay time averaged with only correct-WM tasks, correlated with WM performance in six channels (P < 0.05).

Conclusions: Subjects with better WM performance have higher levels of oxyhemoglobin activation compared with control trials in the WM delay time, and our results suggest that NIRS will be useful for measuring the WM performance.

Show MeSH