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Acute cholecystitis associated with Clonorchis sinensis infection.

Oh JT, Kang DB, Jo HJ - Ann Surg Treat Res (2014)

Bottom Line: Clonorchis sinensis is one of the most common causes of trematodiasis that is caused by the ingestion of raw fish contaminated with infective cysts.The adult flukes are predominantly present in the intrahepatic bile ducts, but occasionally they may be found in the pancreatic duct and extrahepatic bile ducts.The clinical manifestations depend on the number of flukes, the period of infestation, and complications such as pericholangitic abscess, cholangitis, bile duct stones, and cholangiocarcinoma.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Surgery, Digestive Disease Research Institute and Institute of Medical Science, Wonkwang University College of Medicine, Iksan, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Clonorchis sinensis is one of the most common causes of trematodiasis that is caused by the ingestion of raw fish contaminated with infective cysts. The adult flukes are predominantly present in the intrahepatic bile ducts, but occasionally they may be found in the pancreatic duct and extrahepatic bile ducts. The clinical manifestations depend on the number of flukes, the period of infestation, and complications such as pericholangitic abscess, cholangitis, bile duct stones, and cholangiocarcinoma. However, primary acute cholecystitis associated with C. sinensis infection is extremely rare. Herein, we report on a case of primary acute cholecystitis associated with C. sinensis infection.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Operative cholangiography shows neither bile duct dilatation nor obstructive lesions.
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Figure 4: Operative cholangiography shows neither bile duct dilatation nor obstructive lesions.

Mentions: This patient had undergone laparotomy for possible peritonitis and a previous gastrectomy. During surgery, we observed not only turbid bile and necrotized gallbladder without gallstones, but also several flukes in the gall bladder and cystic duct (Fig. 3). On operative cholangiography to investigate the common bile duct (CBD), we did not observe bile duct dilatation or obstructive lesions (Fig. 4).


Acute cholecystitis associated with Clonorchis sinensis infection.

Oh JT, Kang DB, Jo HJ - Ann Surg Treat Res (2014)

Operative cholangiography shows neither bile duct dilatation nor obstructive lesions.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4127904&req=5

Figure 4: Operative cholangiography shows neither bile duct dilatation nor obstructive lesions.
Mentions: This patient had undergone laparotomy for possible peritonitis and a previous gastrectomy. During surgery, we observed not only turbid bile and necrotized gallbladder without gallstones, but also several flukes in the gall bladder and cystic duct (Fig. 3). On operative cholangiography to investigate the common bile duct (CBD), we did not observe bile duct dilatation or obstructive lesions (Fig. 4).

Bottom Line: Clonorchis sinensis is one of the most common causes of trematodiasis that is caused by the ingestion of raw fish contaminated with infective cysts.The adult flukes are predominantly present in the intrahepatic bile ducts, but occasionally they may be found in the pancreatic duct and extrahepatic bile ducts.The clinical manifestations depend on the number of flukes, the period of infestation, and complications such as pericholangitic abscess, cholangitis, bile duct stones, and cholangiocarcinoma.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Surgery, Digestive Disease Research Institute and Institute of Medical Science, Wonkwang University College of Medicine, Iksan, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Clonorchis sinensis is one of the most common causes of trematodiasis that is caused by the ingestion of raw fish contaminated with infective cysts. The adult flukes are predominantly present in the intrahepatic bile ducts, but occasionally they may be found in the pancreatic duct and extrahepatic bile ducts. The clinical manifestations depend on the number of flukes, the period of infestation, and complications such as pericholangitic abscess, cholangitis, bile duct stones, and cholangiocarcinoma. However, primary acute cholecystitis associated with C. sinensis infection is extremely rare. Herein, we report on a case of primary acute cholecystitis associated with C. sinensis infection.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus