Limits...
Renal allograft transplant recipient with ruptured hydatid native kidney.

Bhat RA, Wani I, Khan I, Wani M - Urol Ann (2014)

Bottom Line: Echinococcosis of the kidneys in a renal transplant recipient is extremely rare and its occurrence being related to immunosuppression is a possibility which needs further characterisation.Investigations revealed a ruptured native hydatid kidney.Patient was managed with a combination of chemotherapy and left native nephrectomy and discharged in a satisfactory condition.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of General Medicine, Sheri-Kashmir Institute of Medical Sciences, Soura Srinagar, Kashmir, India.

ABSTRACT
Echinococcosis of the kidneys in a renal transplant recipient is extremely rare and its occurrence being related to immunosuppression is a possibility which needs further characterisation. Ruptured renal hydatid in a renal transplant recipient is not reported so far to our best knowledge. We present a 42-year-old renal allograft receipient who presented one year after transplant with left flank pain, palpable left lumbar mass and gross hydatiduria. Investigations revealed a ruptured native hydatid kidney. Patient was managed with a combination of chemotherapy and left native nephrectomy and discharged in a satisfactory condition.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Ultrasonography abdomen showing ruptured daughter cysts and membranes within the urinary bladder
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4127872&req=5

Figure 2: Ultrasonography abdomen showing ruptured daughter cysts and membranes within the urinary bladder

Mentions: A 42-year male, non-diabetic, known case of hypertension, end-stage renal disease (ESRD), had a renal transplantation done in 2010 with mother as donor. The cause of ESRD was not established after detailed investigations. Patient was on post-transplant immunosuppressive therapy in the form of mycofenolate mofetil and tacrolimus. He presented to our out-patient department with history of left flank pain. Clinical examination was unremarkable except that his abdomen showed left flank fullness and palpable non-tender ballottable mass. Ultrasound (USG) abdomen revealed a septate calcified cystic lesion almost involving whole native kidney measuring 11 × 10 cm suggestive of hydatid kidney. Transplanted right kidney was normal. IgG ELISA for hydatid serology was suggestive with titers of 1:320. Contrast enhanced CT abdomen showed a well-calcified walled lesion with multiple internal septae suggestive of hydatid disease kidney. Patient was put on albendazole and subsequently managed with puncture, aspiration, injection, and re-aspiration technique (PAIR) to which patient did not respond. Patient was advised nephrectomy which he refused. Patient was continued on albendazole and 3 years later patient presented with colicky abdominal pain and passage of whitish membranes in urine. CT abdomen was advised which confirmed the previous findings of hydatid disease kidney with change in size [Figure 1]. USG revealed daughter cysts and membranes in the urinary bladder [Figure 2]. Gross urine examination showed cysts and membranes of echinococcus granulosus [Figure 3]. Patient was successfully managed with left nephrectomy and was discharged on albendazole. The follow-up improvement was noticed by symptomatic improvement and decreasing titers on IgG ELISA.


Renal allograft transplant recipient with ruptured hydatid native kidney.

Bhat RA, Wani I, Khan I, Wani M - Urol Ann (2014)

Ultrasonography abdomen showing ruptured daughter cysts and membranes within the urinary bladder
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4127872&req=5

Figure 2: Ultrasonography abdomen showing ruptured daughter cysts and membranes within the urinary bladder
Mentions: A 42-year male, non-diabetic, known case of hypertension, end-stage renal disease (ESRD), had a renal transplantation done in 2010 with mother as donor. The cause of ESRD was not established after detailed investigations. Patient was on post-transplant immunosuppressive therapy in the form of mycofenolate mofetil and tacrolimus. He presented to our out-patient department with history of left flank pain. Clinical examination was unremarkable except that his abdomen showed left flank fullness and palpable non-tender ballottable mass. Ultrasound (USG) abdomen revealed a septate calcified cystic lesion almost involving whole native kidney measuring 11 × 10 cm suggestive of hydatid kidney. Transplanted right kidney was normal. IgG ELISA for hydatid serology was suggestive with titers of 1:320. Contrast enhanced CT abdomen showed a well-calcified walled lesion with multiple internal septae suggestive of hydatid disease kidney. Patient was put on albendazole and subsequently managed with puncture, aspiration, injection, and re-aspiration technique (PAIR) to which patient did not respond. Patient was advised nephrectomy which he refused. Patient was continued on albendazole and 3 years later patient presented with colicky abdominal pain and passage of whitish membranes in urine. CT abdomen was advised which confirmed the previous findings of hydatid disease kidney with change in size [Figure 1]. USG revealed daughter cysts and membranes in the urinary bladder [Figure 2]. Gross urine examination showed cysts and membranes of echinococcus granulosus [Figure 3]. Patient was successfully managed with left nephrectomy and was discharged on albendazole. The follow-up improvement was noticed by symptomatic improvement and decreasing titers on IgG ELISA.

Bottom Line: Echinococcosis of the kidneys in a renal transplant recipient is extremely rare and its occurrence being related to immunosuppression is a possibility which needs further characterisation.Investigations revealed a ruptured native hydatid kidney.Patient was managed with a combination of chemotherapy and left native nephrectomy and discharged in a satisfactory condition.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of General Medicine, Sheri-Kashmir Institute of Medical Sciences, Soura Srinagar, Kashmir, India.

ABSTRACT
Echinococcosis of the kidneys in a renal transplant recipient is extremely rare and its occurrence being related to immunosuppression is a possibility which needs further characterisation. Ruptured renal hydatid in a renal transplant recipient is not reported so far to our best knowledge. We present a 42-year-old renal allograft receipient who presented one year after transplant with left flank pain, palpable left lumbar mass and gross hydatiduria. Investigations revealed a ruptured native hydatid kidney. Patient was managed with a combination of chemotherapy and left native nephrectomy and discharged in a satisfactory condition.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus