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Cytotoxicity of dietary flavonoids on different human cancer types.

Sak K - Pharmacogn Rev (2014)

Bottom Line: While luteolin and kaempferol can be considered as promising candidate agents for treatment of gastric and ovarian cancers, respectively, apigenin, chrysin, and luteolin have good perspectives as potent antitumor agents for cervical cancer; cells from main sites of flavonoid metabolism (colon and liver) reveal rather large fluctuations in anticancer activity probably due to exposure to various metabolites with different activities.Anticancer effect of flavonoids toward blood cancer cells depend on their myeloid, lymphoid, or erythroid origin; cytotoxic effects of flavonoids on breast and prostate cancer cells are highly related to the expression of hormone receptors.Different flavonoids are often preferentially present in certain food items, and knowledge about the malignant tissue-specific anticancer effects of flavonoids could be purposely applied both in chemoprevention as well as in cancer treatment.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Non Government Organization Praeventio, Tartu, Estonia.

ABSTRACT
Flavonoids are ubiquitous in nature. They are also in food, providing an essential link between diet and prevention of chronic diseases including cancer. Anticancer effects of these polyphenols depend on several factors: Their chemical structure and concentration, and also on the type of cancer. Malignant cells from different tissues reveal somewhat different sensitivity toward flavonoids and, therefore, the preferences of the most common dietary flavonoids to various human cancer types are analyzed in this review. While luteolin and kaempferol can be considered as promising candidate agents for treatment of gastric and ovarian cancers, respectively, apigenin, chrysin, and luteolin have good perspectives as potent antitumor agents for cervical cancer; cells from main sites of flavonoid metabolism (colon and liver) reveal rather large fluctuations in anticancer activity probably due to exposure to various metabolites with different activities. Anticancer effect of flavonoids toward blood cancer cells depend on their myeloid, lymphoid, or erythroid origin; cytotoxic effects of flavonoids on breast and prostate cancer cells are highly related to the expression of hormone receptors. Different flavonoids are often preferentially present in certain food items, and knowledge about the malignant tissue-specific anticancer effects of flavonoids could be purposely applied both in chemoprevention as well as in cancer treatment.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Cytotoxic effect of apigenin on human breast cancer cell lines depending on the expression of estrogen receptors
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Figure 3: Cytotoxic effect of apigenin on human breast cancer cell lines depending on the expression of estrogen receptors

Mentions: Most breast cancers are heterogeneous and consist of ER-positive and -negative cells. Therefore, agents that are able to inhibit the growth of both ER-positive and -negative tumors are of great interest.[136] Dietary flavonoids seem to display such dual activity, inhibiting both receptor-positive and -negative breast cancer cells [Table 2]. For instance, no difference in the cytotoxicity of naringenin has been found between human breast cancer cell lines expressing or not expressing ERs[24] and the regular intake of this flavanone may slow down the rate at which breast cancer cells proliferate.[103] High flavone intake has also been significantly correlated with a lower risk of breast cancer[68] and apigenin, baicalein, and luteolin may be promising candidate agents in the treatment of mammary tumors.[137138139] However, although apigenin can target both ER-dependent and -independent pathways, it seems to be somewhat more potent on ER-positive human breast cancer cell lines [Figure 3], thus providing more promise for the treatment of ER-positive tumors.


Cytotoxicity of dietary flavonoids on different human cancer types.

Sak K - Pharmacogn Rev (2014)

Cytotoxic effect of apigenin on human breast cancer cell lines depending on the expression of estrogen receptors
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4127821&req=5

Figure 3: Cytotoxic effect of apigenin on human breast cancer cell lines depending on the expression of estrogen receptors
Mentions: Most breast cancers are heterogeneous and consist of ER-positive and -negative cells. Therefore, agents that are able to inhibit the growth of both ER-positive and -negative tumors are of great interest.[136] Dietary flavonoids seem to display such dual activity, inhibiting both receptor-positive and -negative breast cancer cells [Table 2]. For instance, no difference in the cytotoxicity of naringenin has been found between human breast cancer cell lines expressing or not expressing ERs[24] and the regular intake of this flavanone may slow down the rate at which breast cancer cells proliferate.[103] High flavone intake has also been significantly correlated with a lower risk of breast cancer[68] and apigenin, baicalein, and luteolin may be promising candidate agents in the treatment of mammary tumors.[137138139] However, although apigenin can target both ER-dependent and -independent pathways, it seems to be somewhat more potent on ER-positive human breast cancer cell lines [Figure 3], thus providing more promise for the treatment of ER-positive tumors.

Bottom Line: While luteolin and kaempferol can be considered as promising candidate agents for treatment of gastric and ovarian cancers, respectively, apigenin, chrysin, and luteolin have good perspectives as potent antitumor agents for cervical cancer; cells from main sites of flavonoid metabolism (colon and liver) reveal rather large fluctuations in anticancer activity probably due to exposure to various metabolites with different activities.Anticancer effect of flavonoids toward blood cancer cells depend on their myeloid, lymphoid, or erythroid origin; cytotoxic effects of flavonoids on breast and prostate cancer cells are highly related to the expression of hormone receptors.Different flavonoids are often preferentially present in certain food items, and knowledge about the malignant tissue-specific anticancer effects of flavonoids could be purposely applied both in chemoprevention as well as in cancer treatment.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Non Government Organization Praeventio, Tartu, Estonia.

ABSTRACT
Flavonoids are ubiquitous in nature. They are also in food, providing an essential link between diet and prevention of chronic diseases including cancer. Anticancer effects of these polyphenols depend on several factors: Their chemical structure and concentration, and also on the type of cancer. Malignant cells from different tissues reveal somewhat different sensitivity toward flavonoids and, therefore, the preferences of the most common dietary flavonoids to various human cancer types are analyzed in this review. While luteolin and kaempferol can be considered as promising candidate agents for treatment of gastric and ovarian cancers, respectively, apigenin, chrysin, and luteolin have good perspectives as potent antitumor agents for cervical cancer; cells from main sites of flavonoid metabolism (colon and liver) reveal rather large fluctuations in anticancer activity probably due to exposure to various metabolites with different activities. Anticancer effect of flavonoids toward blood cancer cells depend on their myeloid, lymphoid, or erythroid origin; cytotoxic effects of flavonoids on breast and prostate cancer cells are highly related to the expression of hormone receptors. Different flavonoids are often preferentially present in certain food items, and knowledge about the malignant tissue-specific anticancer effects of flavonoids could be purposely applied both in chemoprevention as well as in cancer treatment.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus