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Use of quartz fiber post for reattachment of complex crown root fractures: A 4-year follow-up.

Hegde SG, Tawani GS, Warhadpande MM - J Conserv Dent (2014)

Bottom Line: Dental hard tissue trauma is among the most common cases encountered in dental practice.Simple tooth fractures, which occur due to sharp blows, are widely seen in all age groups, especially in young adults.The first case showing a 4-year success was treated without raising a flap.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Conservative Dentistry and Endodontics, Government Dental College and Hospital, Nagpur, Maharashtra, India.

ABSTRACT
Dental hard tissue trauma is among the most common cases encountered in dental practice. Simple tooth fractures, which occur due to sharp blows, are widely seen in all age groups, especially in young adults. If in case of complex fractures the fractured tooth fragments are available to the dentist in a clean and hydrated state, reattachment of the tooth fragment is the most conservative and biological treatment option possible. Cases of enamel and dentin fractures not involving pulp are treated by reattaching the fragment with adhesives and composite resin. However, fractures involving the pulp require reinforcement by quartz fiber posts and resin luting cement. In cases of fractures extending subgingivally, an envelope flap helps to achieve the desired isolation and visibility. This article presents 2 case reports of reattachment of fractured tooth fragments. The first case showing a 4-year success was treated without raising a flap. The second case with a subgingival fracture was treated by raising a flap. Reattachment is the most economical, biologically acceptable and esthetic restorative option for dental trauma.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Clinical photograph and radiograph of case 2. (a) Pre operative photograph, (b) Post obturation radiograph, (c) Palatal envelope flap raised, (d) Post and fractured fragment luted, (e) Sutures given, (f) Post cementation radiograph, (g) At 6 months follow-up
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Figure 2: Clinical photograph and radiograph of case 2. (a) Pre operative photograph, (b) Post obturation radiograph, (c) Palatal envelope flap raised, (d) Post and fractured fragment luted, (e) Sutures given, (f) Post cementation radiograph, (g) At 6 months follow-up

Mentions: A 20-year-old male patient reported to the Department of Conservative Dentistry and Endodontics with the chief complaint of mobile maxillary anterior tooth. He gave a history of sport injury the evening before. Clinical examination revealed Ellis Class III fracture with 11 with the fracture line extending subgingivally palatally [Figure 2a]. As the fragment was in the oral cavity, it had not got dehydrated. Radiographic examination showed no other fractures in the root and healthy periapical tissues. The treatment plan decided for the patient was reattachment of the fragment.


Use of quartz fiber post for reattachment of complex crown root fractures: A 4-year follow-up.

Hegde SG, Tawani GS, Warhadpande MM - J Conserv Dent (2014)

Clinical photograph and radiograph of case 2. (a) Pre operative photograph, (b) Post obturation radiograph, (c) Palatal envelope flap raised, (d) Post and fractured fragment luted, (e) Sutures given, (f) Post cementation radiograph, (g) At 6 months follow-up
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4127703&req=5

Figure 2: Clinical photograph and radiograph of case 2. (a) Pre operative photograph, (b) Post obturation radiograph, (c) Palatal envelope flap raised, (d) Post and fractured fragment luted, (e) Sutures given, (f) Post cementation radiograph, (g) At 6 months follow-up
Mentions: A 20-year-old male patient reported to the Department of Conservative Dentistry and Endodontics with the chief complaint of mobile maxillary anterior tooth. He gave a history of sport injury the evening before. Clinical examination revealed Ellis Class III fracture with 11 with the fracture line extending subgingivally palatally [Figure 2a]. As the fragment was in the oral cavity, it had not got dehydrated. Radiographic examination showed no other fractures in the root and healthy periapical tissues. The treatment plan decided for the patient was reattachment of the fragment.

Bottom Line: Dental hard tissue trauma is among the most common cases encountered in dental practice.Simple tooth fractures, which occur due to sharp blows, are widely seen in all age groups, especially in young adults.The first case showing a 4-year success was treated without raising a flap.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Conservative Dentistry and Endodontics, Government Dental College and Hospital, Nagpur, Maharashtra, India.

ABSTRACT
Dental hard tissue trauma is among the most common cases encountered in dental practice. Simple tooth fractures, which occur due to sharp blows, are widely seen in all age groups, especially in young adults. If in case of complex fractures the fractured tooth fragments are available to the dentist in a clean and hydrated state, reattachment of the tooth fragment is the most conservative and biological treatment option possible. Cases of enamel and dentin fractures not involving pulp are treated by reattaching the fragment with adhesives and composite resin. However, fractures involving the pulp require reinforcement by quartz fiber posts and resin luting cement. In cases of fractures extending subgingivally, an envelope flap helps to achieve the desired isolation and visibility. This article presents 2 case reports of reattachment of fractured tooth fragments. The first case showing a 4-year success was treated without raising a flap. The second case with a subgingival fracture was treated by raising a flap. Reattachment is the most economical, biologically acceptable and esthetic restorative option for dental trauma.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus