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A case of lung carcinoma with rhabdoid phenotype mimicking an aspergilloma in patient with recurrent hemoptysis.

Kim MW, Rew SJ, Eun SJ, Lee US, Park CW, Jeong JP, Ko YC - Tuberc Respir Dis (Seoul) (2014)

Bottom Line: An aspergilloma was diagnosed by the radiologist.However, after surgical excision and pathological examination, rhabdoid carcinoma was diagnosed.A surgical resection helps to make it possible to pathologically distinguish a malignancy from an aspergilloma.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Tuberculosis and Pulmonology, Department of Internal Medicine, Kwangju Christian Hospital, Gwangju, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Malignant rhabdoid tumor was first discovered in the kidney, and rhabdoid tumor of the lung was first reported in 1995. These were included as the variants of large-cell carcinoma, according to the 1999 World Health Organization classification of lung tumors. The rhabdoid tumor of the lung exhibits aggressive biological behavior and has a poor prognosis, and only a few reports of this tumor exist. We report a case of lung carcinoma with a rhabdoid phenotype, initially misdiagnosed as an aspergilloma, in a 48-year-old man who presented with recurrent hemoptysis. The chest computed tomography scans showed a huge consolidative lesion with an air crescent sign in the left upper lung and no contrast-enhancing lesion. An aspergilloma was diagnosed by the radiologist. However, after surgical excision and pathological examination, rhabdoid carcinoma was diagnosed. A surgical resection helps to make it possible to pathologically distinguish a malignancy from an aspergilloma.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Histopathologic examination showed large nucleus with atypism (arrows) and focally eccentric eosinophilic cytoplasm (H&E stain, ×200).
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Figure 3: Histopathologic examination showed large nucleus with atypism (arrows) and focally eccentric eosinophilic cytoplasm (H&E stain, ×200).

Mentions: Pathologic examination of the biopsy revealed extensive central necrosis and a solid area without any evidence of fungal involvement. On immunohistochemical staining, the tumor cells showed a negative reaction for cytokeratin, vimentin, actin, desmin, S-100, CD34, CD68, D2-40, calretinin, and p63, except for a focally positive reaction to epithelial membrane antigen. The tumor cells had a large nucleus with atypism and focally eccentric eosinophilic cytoplasm (Figure 3). The tumor was diagnosed as an undifferentiated malignant tumor of the rhabdoid phenotype because of the poor differentiation. A brain magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography-computed tomography scan demonstrated no metastatic lesion and we made a plan to follow up the patient with CT scanning in the outpatient department.


A case of lung carcinoma with rhabdoid phenotype mimicking an aspergilloma in patient with recurrent hemoptysis.

Kim MW, Rew SJ, Eun SJ, Lee US, Park CW, Jeong JP, Ko YC - Tuberc Respir Dis (Seoul) (2014)

Histopathologic examination showed large nucleus with atypism (arrows) and focally eccentric eosinophilic cytoplasm (H&E stain, ×200).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4127412&req=5

Figure 3: Histopathologic examination showed large nucleus with atypism (arrows) and focally eccentric eosinophilic cytoplasm (H&E stain, ×200).
Mentions: Pathologic examination of the biopsy revealed extensive central necrosis and a solid area without any evidence of fungal involvement. On immunohistochemical staining, the tumor cells showed a negative reaction for cytokeratin, vimentin, actin, desmin, S-100, CD34, CD68, D2-40, calretinin, and p63, except for a focally positive reaction to epithelial membrane antigen. The tumor cells had a large nucleus with atypism and focally eccentric eosinophilic cytoplasm (Figure 3). The tumor was diagnosed as an undifferentiated malignant tumor of the rhabdoid phenotype because of the poor differentiation. A brain magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography-computed tomography scan demonstrated no metastatic lesion and we made a plan to follow up the patient with CT scanning in the outpatient department.

Bottom Line: An aspergilloma was diagnosed by the radiologist.However, after surgical excision and pathological examination, rhabdoid carcinoma was diagnosed.A surgical resection helps to make it possible to pathologically distinguish a malignancy from an aspergilloma.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Tuberculosis and Pulmonology, Department of Internal Medicine, Kwangju Christian Hospital, Gwangju, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Malignant rhabdoid tumor was first discovered in the kidney, and rhabdoid tumor of the lung was first reported in 1995. These were included as the variants of large-cell carcinoma, according to the 1999 World Health Organization classification of lung tumors. The rhabdoid tumor of the lung exhibits aggressive biological behavior and has a poor prognosis, and only a few reports of this tumor exist. We report a case of lung carcinoma with a rhabdoid phenotype, initially misdiagnosed as an aspergilloma, in a 48-year-old man who presented with recurrent hemoptysis. The chest computed tomography scans showed a huge consolidative lesion with an air crescent sign in the left upper lung and no contrast-enhancing lesion. An aspergilloma was diagnosed by the radiologist. However, after surgical excision and pathological examination, rhabdoid carcinoma was diagnosed. A surgical resection helps to make it possible to pathologically distinguish a malignancy from an aspergilloma.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus