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Annual Change in Pulmonary Function and Clinical Characteristics of Combined Pulmonary Fibrosis and Emphysema and Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis: Over a 3-Year Follow-up.

Kim YJ, Shin SH, Park JW, Kyung SY, Kang SM, Lee SP, Sung YM, Kim YK, Jeong SH - Tuberc Respir Dis (Seoul) (2014)

Bottom Line: The annual decrease in FEV1/FVC in the CPFE was significantly higher than in the IPF.The annual decreases in diffusion capacity of carbon monoxide and FVC showed no significant differences between the two groups.The annual decrease of FEV1/FVC was in patients with CPFE significantly higher than in the patients with IPF.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Pulmonology, Department of Internal Medicine, Gachon University Gil Medical Center, Incheon, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Background: Combined pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema (CPFE) have different pulmonary function tests (PFTs) and outcomes than idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). The intention of this study was to identify unknown differences between CPFE and IPF by a retrospective comparison of clinical data including baseline and annual changes in pulmonary function, comorbidities, laboratory findings, clinical characteristics and cause of hospitalization.

Methods: This study retrospectively enrolled patients with CPFE and IPF who had undergone PFTs once or several times per year during a follow-up period of three years. Baseline clinical characteristics and the annual changes in the pulmonary function during the follow-up period were compared between 26 with CPFE and 42 patients with IPF.

Results: The baseline ratio of forced expiratory volume in one second to forced vital capacity (FEV1/FVC%) in patients with CPFE was lower than that in patients with IPF (78.6±1.7 vs. 82.9±1.1, p=0.041). The annual decrease in FEV1/FVC in the CPFE was significantly higher than in the IPF. The annual decreases in diffusion capacity of carbon monoxide and FVC showed no significant differences between the two groups. The symptom durations of cough and sputum were in the CPFE significantly lower than in the IPF. The serum erythrocyte sedimentation rate level at the acute stage was significantly higher than in the IPF. There were no significant differences in the hospitalization rate and pneumonia was the most common cause of hospitalization in both study groups.

Conclusion: The annual decrease of FEV1/FVC was in patients with CPFE significantly higher than in the patients with IPF.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Kaplan-Meier survival curves. CPFE: combined pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema; IPF: idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.
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Figure 1: Kaplan-Meier survival curves. CPFE: combined pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema; IPF: idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

Mentions: Male accounted for 23 (88.5%) of the CPFE and was significantly higher than that the IPF (p=0.007). Smoking status and pack-year were significantly higher in the CPFE (p=0.001). In the analysis of respiratory symptoms (excertional dyspnea, cough, and sputum), there were no significant differences between the two groups. The mean symptom duration for both cough and sputum were significantly longer in the IPF than in the CPFE (p=0.007 and p=0.018). There were no significant differences between the two groups in FVC and FEV1, but the FEV1/FVC ratio was significantly lower in the CPFE patient group (p=0.041). DLco (%) were lower in the CPFE compared to the IPF, but the difference was not statistically significant. Both groups exhibited an elevated pulmonary artery pressure compared with normal range, but there was no significant difference between the two groups. We observed no significant difference in survival both group (Figure 1).


Annual Change in Pulmonary Function and Clinical Characteristics of Combined Pulmonary Fibrosis and Emphysema and Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis: Over a 3-Year Follow-up.

Kim YJ, Shin SH, Park JW, Kyung SY, Kang SM, Lee SP, Sung YM, Kim YK, Jeong SH - Tuberc Respir Dis (Seoul) (2014)

Kaplan-Meier survival curves. CPFE: combined pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema; IPF: idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4127408&req=5

Figure 1: Kaplan-Meier survival curves. CPFE: combined pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema; IPF: idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.
Mentions: Male accounted for 23 (88.5%) of the CPFE and was significantly higher than that the IPF (p=0.007). Smoking status and pack-year were significantly higher in the CPFE (p=0.001). In the analysis of respiratory symptoms (excertional dyspnea, cough, and sputum), there were no significant differences between the two groups. The mean symptom duration for both cough and sputum were significantly longer in the IPF than in the CPFE (p=0.007 and p=0.018). There were no significant differences between the two groups in FVC and FEV1, but the FEV1/FVC ratio was significantly lower in the CPFE patient group (p=0.041). DLco (%) were lower in the CPFE compared to the IPF, but the difference was not statistically significant. Both groups exhibited an elevated pulmonary artery pressure compared with normal range, but there was no significant difference between the two groups. We observed no significant difference in survival both group (Figure 1).

Bottom Line: The annual decrease in FEV1/FVC in the CPFE was significantly higher than in the IPF.The annual decreases in diffusion capacity of carbon monoxide and FVC showed no significant differences between the two groups.The annual decrease of FEV1/FVC was in patients with CPFE significantly higher than in the patients with IPF.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Pulmonology, Department of Internal Medicine, Gachon University Gil Medical Center, Incheon, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Background: Combined pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema (CPFE) have different pulmonary function tests (PFTs) and outcomes than idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). The intention of this study was to identify unknown differences between CPFE and IPF by a retrospective comparison of clinical data including baseline and annual changes in pulmonary function, comorbidities, laboratory findings, clinical characteristics and cause of hospitalization.

Methods: This study retrospectively enrolled patients with CPFE and IPF who had undergone PFTs once or several times per year during a follow-up period of three years. Baseline clinical characteristics and the annual changes in the pulmonary function during the follow-up period were compared between 26 with CPFE and 42 patients with IPF.

Results: The baseline ratio of forced expiratory volume in one second to forced vital capacity (FEV1/FVC%) in patients with CPFE was lower than that in patients with IPF (78.6±1.7 vs. 82.9±1.1, p=0.041). The annual decrease in FEV1/FVC in the CPFE was significantly higher than in the IPF. The annual decreases in diffusion capacity of carbon monoxide and FVC showed no significant differences between the two groups. The symptom durations of cough and sputum were in the CPFE significantly lower than in the IPF. The serum erythrocyte sedimentation rate level at the acute stage was significantly higher than in the IPF. There were no significant differences in the hospitalization rate and pneumonia was the most common cause of hospitalization in both study groups.

Conclusion: The annual decrease of FEV1/FVC was in patients with CPFE significantly higher than in the patients with IPF.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus