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Outcomes of second-line chemotherapy for advanced non-small cell lung cancer in one institution.

Lee SJ, Kang HJ, Kim SW, Ryu YJ, Lee JH, Kim Y, Chang JH - Tuberc Respir Dis (Seoul) (2014)

Bottom Line: The effects of clinical parameters on survival were analyzed and the hazard ratios (HR) for mortality were identified by a Cox regression analysis.The multivariate analysis showed that patients older than 65 years (HR, 1.530; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.020-2.297), advanced T stage (T4 vs.The results may help to predict outcomes for these patients in the future.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Internal Medicine, Ewha Womans University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Background: This study analyzed the negative prognostic factors in patients who received second-line chemotherapy for advanced inoperable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the records of 137 patients with inoperable stage III-IV NSCLC who received second-line chemotherapy. The effects of clinical parameters on survival were analyzed and the hazard ratios (HR) for mortality were identified by a Cox regression analysis.

Results: Sex, age older than 65 years, smoking history, cell type, T-stage, best response to first-line chemotherapy and first-line chemotherapy regimen were significant negative predictors in univariate analysis. The multivariate analysis showed that patients older than 65 years (HR, 1.530; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.020-2.297), advanced T stage (T4 vs. T1; HR, 2.273; 95% CI, 1.010-5.114) and non-responders who showed progression with first-line chemotherapy (HR, 1.530; 95% CI, 1.063-2.203) had higher HR for death.

Conclusion: The age factor, T stage and responsiveness to first-line chemotherapy were important factors in predicting the outcome of patients with advanced NSCLC who received second-line chemotherapy. The results may help to predict outcomes for these patients in the future.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

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Figure 1: Flow diagram showing the enrollment process.

Mentions: Of total 853 patients confirmed with lung cancer, 748 patients were diagnosed with NSCLC. First-line chemotherapy was undergone by 275 patients with stage III-IV, pathologically proven NSCLC who were inoperable or who had rejected surgery. Second-line chemotherapy was undergone by 137 patients who showed progression during first-line chemotherapy (n=98), or some time after completing first-line chemotherapy (n=7), or who stop receiving chemotherapy because of adverse effects, performance, or their own decision (n=32) (Figure 1). The median age was 63 years old (range, 39-86 years); 96 (70%) were male and 41 (30%) were female. Adenocarcinoma was the most common cell type (46%), followed by squamous cell carcinoma (34%). Best response to first-line chemotherapy was partial remission (PR) in 42% of patients, stable disease (SD) in 17%, and progressive disease (PD) in 41%. Platinum-based chemotherapeutics were used in 49% of patients for second-line chemotherapy. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors, pemetrexed, and docetaxel were prescribed as single agents (Table 1).


Outcomes of second-line chemotherapy for advanced non-small cell lung cancer in one institution.

Lee SJ, Kang HJ, Kim SW, Ryu YJ, Lee JH, Kim Y, Chang JH - Tuberc Respir Dis (Seoul) (2014)

Flow diagram showing the enrollment process.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4127407&req=5

Figure 1: Flow diagram showing the enrollment process.
Mentions: Of total 853 patients confirmed with lung cancer, 748 patients were diagnosed with NSCLC. First-line chemotherapy was undergone by 275 patients with stage III-IV, pathologically proven NSCLC who were inoperable or who had rejected surgery. Second-line chemotherapy was undergone by 137 patients who showed progression during first-line chemotherapy (n=98), or some time after completing first-line chemotherapy (n=7), or who stop receiving chemotherapy because of adverse effects, performance, or their own decision (n=32) (Figure 1). The median age was 63 years old (range, 39-86 years); 96 (70%) were male and 41 (30%) were female. Adenocarcinoma was the most common cell type (46%), followed by squamous cell carcinoma (34%). Best response to first-line chemotherapy was partial remission (PR) in 42% of patients, stable disease (SD) in 17%, and progressive disease (PD) in 41%. Platinum-based chemotherapeutics were used in 49% of patients for second-line chemotherapy. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors, pemetrexed, and docetaxel were prescribed as single agents (Table 1).

Bottom Line: The effects of clinical parameters on survival were analyzed and the hazard ratios (HR) for mortality were identified by a Cox regression analysis.The multivariate analysis showed that patients older than 65 years (HR, 1.530; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.020-2.297), advanced T stage (T4 vs.The results may help to predict outcomes for these patients in the future.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Internal Medicine, Ewha Womans University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Background: This study analyzed the negative prognostic factors in patients who received second-line chemotherapy for advanced inoperable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the records of 137 patients with inoperable stage III-IV NSCLC who received second-line chemotherapy. The effects of clinical parameters on survival were analyzed and the hazard ratios (HR) for mortality were identified by a Cox regression analysis.

Results: Sex, age older than 65 years, smoking history, cell type, T-stage, best response to first-line chemotherapy and first-line chemotherapy regimen were significant negative predictors in univariate analysis. The multivariate analysis showed that patients older than 65 years (HR, 1.530; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.020-2.297), advanced T stage (T4 vs. T1; HR, 2.273; 95% CI, 1.010-5.114) and non-responders who showed progression with first-line chemotherapy (HR, 1.530; 95% CI, 1.063-2.203) had higher HR for death.

Conclusion: The age factor, T stage and responsiveness to first-line chemotherapy were important factors in predicting the outcome of patients with advanced NSCLC who received second-line chemotherapy. The results may help to predict outcomes for these patients in the future.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus