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Comprehensive understanding of atrial septal defects by imaging studies for successful transcatheter closure.

Song J - Korean J Pediatr (2014)

Bottom Line: Both the anatomy and morphology of the defect should be precisely evaluated before the procedure.Three-dimensional (3D) echocardiography and cardiac computed tomography are helpful for understanding the morphology of a defect, which is important because different defect morphologies could variously impact the results.During the procedure, real-time 3D echocardiography can be used to guide an accurate closure.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pediatrics, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Transcatheter closure of atrial septal defects has become a popular procedure. The availability of a preprocedural imaging study is crucial for a safe and successful closure. Both the anatomy and morphology of the defect should be precisely evaluated before the procedure. Three-dimensional (3D) echocardiography and cardiac computed tomography are helpful for understanding the morphology of a defect, which is important because different defect morphologies could variously impact the results. During the procedure, real-time 3D echocardiography can be used to guide an accurate closure. The safety and efficiency of transcatheter closures of atrial septal defects could be improved through the use of detailed imaging studies.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Three-dimensional reconstructed en-face images of an atrial septal defect (white arrow) showing an ovoid, as opposed to a circular, shape from transesophageal echocardiography (A) and cardiac computed tomography (B). a, longest diameter of defect; b, shortest diameter of defect; SVC, superior vena cava; IVC, inferior vena cava; CS, coronary sinus; AO, aorta; RV, right ventricle; TSM, trabecular septomarginalis; PA, pulmonary artery.
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Figure 4: Three-dimensional reconstructed en-face images of an atrial septal defect (white arrow) showing an ovoid, as opposed to a circular, shape from transesophageal echocardiography (A) and cardiac computed tomography (B). a, longest diameter of defect; b, shortest diameter of defect; SVC, superior vena cava; IVC, inferior vena cava; CS, coronary sinus; AO, aorta; RV, right ventricle; TSM, trabecular septomarginalis; PA, pulmonary artery.

Mentions: It is not surprising that many ASDs are not circular in shape, and indeed complex ASD shapes have been described by some authors16,19,20,21,22,23). Three-dimensional (3D) images should be reconstructed from 2D images for a complete understanding of defect shape. This can be achieved by real-time 3D TEE or 3D cardiac CT (Fig. 4). The preprocedural evaluation of an ASD undergoing device closure should be different from that used before surgical closure. Devices used for ASD closure do not reflect the various defect shapes, and all ASDs are assumed to be circular based on the longest diameter. However, the eccentricity of a defect could make a difference in device selection.


Comprehensive understanding of atrial septal defects by imaging studies for successful transcatheter closure.

Song J - Korean J Pediatr (2014)

Three-dimensional reconstructed en-face images of an atrial septal defect (white arrow) showing an ovoid, as opposed to a circular, shape from transesophageal echocardiography (A) and cardiac computed tomography (B). a, longest diameter of defect; b, shortest diameter of defect; SVC, superior vena cava; IVC, inferior vena cava; CS, coronary sinus; AO, aorta; RV, right ventricle; TSM, trabecular septomarginalis; PA, pulmonary artery.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4127391&req=5

Figure 4: Three-dimensional reconstructed en-face images of an atrial septal defect (white arrow) showing an ovoid, as opposed to a circular, shape from transesophageal echocardiography (A) and cardiac computed tomography (B). a, longest diameter of defect; b, shortest diameter of defect; SVC, superior vena cava; IVC, inferior vena cava; CS, coronary sinus; AO, aorta; RV, right ventricle; TSM, trabecular septomarginalis; PA, pulmonary artery.
Mentions: It is not surprising that many ASDs are not circular in shape, and indeed complex ASD shapes have been described by some authors16,19,20,21,22,23). Three-dimensional (3D) images should be reconstructed from 2D images for a complete understanding of defect shape. This can be achieved by real-time 3D TEE or 3D cardiac CT (Fig. 4). The preprocedural evaluation of an ASD undergoing device closure should be different from that used before surgical closure. Devices used for ASD closure do not reflect the various defect shapes, and all ASDs are assumed to be circular based on the longest diameter. However, the eccentricity of a defect could make a difference in device selection.

Bottom Line: Both the anatomy and morphology of the defect should be precisely evaluated before the procedure.Three-dimensional (3D) echocardiography and cardiac computed tomography are helpful for understanding the morphology of a defect, which is important because different defect morphologies could variously impact the results.During the procedure, real-time 3D echocardiography can be used to guide an accurate closure.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pediatrics, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Transcatheter closure of atrial septal defects has become a popular procedure. The availability of a preprocedural imaging study is crucial for a safe and successful closure. Both the anatomy and morphology of the defect should be precisely evaluated before the procedure. Three-dimensional (3D) echocardiography and cardiac computed tomography are helpful for understanding the morphology of a defect, which is important because different defect morphologies could variously impact the results. During the procedure, real-time 3D echocardiography can be used to guide an accurate closure. The safety and efficiency of transcatheter closures of atrial septal defects could be improved through the use of detailed imaging studies.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus