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Clinical applications of platelet-rich plasma in patellar tendinopathy.

Jeong DU, Lee CR, Lee JH, Pak J, Kang LW, Jeong BC, Lee SH - Biomed Res Int (2014)

Bottom Line: Platelet-rich plasma (PRP), a blood derivative with high concentrations of platelets, has been found to have high levels of autologous growth factors (GFs), such as transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), fibroblastic growth factor (FGF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and epidermal growth factor (EGF).These GFs and other biological active proteins of PRP can promote tissue healing through the regulation of fibrosis and angiogenesis.Moreover, PRP is considered to be safe due to its autologous nature and long-term usage without any reported major complications.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Medicine, Korea University College of Medicine, 73 Inchon-ro, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-705, Republic of Korea ; National Leading Research Laboratory, Department of Biological Sciences, Myongji University, 116 Myongji-ro, Yongin, Gyeonggi-do 449-728, Republic of Korea.

ABSTRACT
Platelet-rich plasma (PRP), a blood derivative with high concentrations of platelets, has been found to have high levels of autologous growth factors (GFs), such as transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), fibroblastic growth factor (FGF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and epidermal growth factor (EGF). These GFs and other biological active proteins of PRP can promote tissue healing through the regulation of fibrosis and angiogenesis. Moreover, PRP is considered to be safe due to its autologous nature and long-term usage without any reported major complications. Therefore, PRP therapy could be an option in treating overused tendon damage such as chronic tendinopathy. Here, we present a systematic review highlighting the clinical effectiveness of PRP injection therapy in patellar tendinopathy, which is a major cause of athletes to retire from their respective careers.

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Literature selection process (PRISMA flow diagram).
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fig1: Literature selection process (PRISMA flow diagram).

Mentions: We used the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis (PRISMA) in our review [14] (Figure 1). We conducted a systematic literature search in the following databases: Medline via PubMed and the Cochrane Library. Additionally, we also searched on the following Web sites: National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (http://www.nice.org.uk), Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health (http://www.cadth.ca), Current Controlled Trials (http://www.controlled-trials.com), and BioMed Central (http://www.biomedcentral.com). We used keywords as search terms. We combined terms for selected indications (platelet-rich plasma, patellar, tendinopathy, tendinosis, tendonitis, tendinitis, and tendon). The literature search included all studies published in English between 2000 and 2014. We identified 127 references after removing duplicates. We independently assessed full-text articles for inclusion in our review. The criteria for inclusion of studies in our review encompassed all clinical trials of PRP injection conducted on humans with patellar tendinopathy. After discarding 15 review articles, we identified 15 clinical trials (two randomized controlled trial (RCT) studies, six nonrandomized controlled trial (non-RCT) studies, two prospective case-series study, three case studies, and two retrospective studies).


Clinical applications of platelet-rich plasma in patellar tendinopathy.

Jeong DU, Lee CR, Lee JH, Pak J, Kang LW, Jeong BC, Lee SH - Biomed Res Int (2014)

Literature selection process (PRISMA flow diagram).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4127290&req=5

fig1: Literature selection process (PRISMA flow diagram).
Mentions: We used the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis (PRISMA) in our review [14] (Figure 1). We conducted a systematic literature search in the following databases: Medline via PubMed and the Cochrane Library. Additionally, we also searched on the following Web sites: National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (http://www.nice.org.uk), Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health (http://www.cadth.ca), Current Controlled Trials (http://www.controlled-trials.com), and BioMed Central (http://www.biomedcentral.com). We used keywords as search terms. We combined terms for selected indications (platelet-rich plasma, patellar, tendinopathy, tendinosis, tendonitis, tendinitis, and tendon). The literature search included all studies published in English between 2000 and 2014. We identified 127 references after removing duplicates. We independently assessed full-text articles for inclusion in our review. The criteria for inclusion of studies in our review encompassed all clinical trials of PRP injection conducted on humans with patellar tendinopathy. After discarding 15 review articles, we identified 15 clinical trials (two randomized controlled trial (RCT) studies, six nonrandomized controlled trial (non-RCT) studies, two prospective case-series study, three case studies, and two retrospective studies).

Bottom Line: Platelet-rich plasma (PRP), a blood derivative with high concentrations of platelets, has been found to have high levels of autologous growth factors (GFs), such as transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), fibroblastic growth factor (FGF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and epidermal growth factor (EGF).These GFs and other biological active proteins of PRP can promote tissue healing through the regulation of fibrosis and angiogenesis.Moreover, PRP is considered to be safe due to its autologous nature and long-term usage without any reported major complications.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Medicine, Korea University College of Medicine, 73 Inchon-ro, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-705, Republic of Korea ; National Leading Research Laboratory, Department of Biological Sciences, Myongji University, 116 Myongji-ro, Yongin, Gyeonggi-do 449-728, Republic of Korea.

ABSTRACT
Platelet-rich plasma (PRP), a blood derivative with high concentrations of platelets, has been found to have high levels of autologous growth factors (GFs), such as transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), fibroblastic growth factor (FGF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and epidermal growth factor (EGF). These GFs and other biological active proteins of PRP can promote tissue healing through the regulation of fibrosis and angiogenesis. Moreover, PRP is considered to be safe due to its autologous nature and long-term usage without any reported major complications. Therefore, PRP therapy could be an option in treating overused tendon damage such as chronic tendinopathy. Here, we present a systematic review highlighting the clinical effectiveness of PRP injection therapy in patellar tendinopathy, which is a major cause of athletes to retire from their respective careers.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus