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Gender and family disparities in suicide attempt and role of socioeconomic, school, and health-related difficulties in early adolescence.

Chau K, Kabuth B, Chau N - Biomed Res Int (2014)

Bottom Line: No family disparities were observed among boys.Girls had a 1.74-time higher SA risk than boys, and 45% of the risk was explained by socioeconomic, school, and mental difficulties and violence.SA prevention should be performed in early adolescence and consider gender and family differences and the role of socioeconomic, school, and health-related difficulties.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Service de Médecine Générale, Faculty of Medicine, Lorraine University, 9 Avenue de la Forêt de Haye, BP 184, 54505 Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy Cedex, France.

ABSTRACT
Suicide attempt (SA) is common in early adolescence and the risk may differ between boys and girls in nonintact families partly because of socioeconomic, school, and health-related difficulties. This study explored the gender and family disparities and the role of these covariates. Questionnaires were completed by 1,559 middle-school adolescents from north-eastern France including sex, age, socioeconomic factors (family structure, nationality, parents' education, father's occupation, family income, and social support), grade repetition, depressive symptoms, sustained violence, sexual abuse, unhealthy behaviors (tobacco/alcohol/cannabis/hard drug use), SA, and their first occurrence over adolescent's life course. Data were analyzed using Cox regression models. SA affected 12.5% of girls and 7.2% of boys (P < 0.001). The girls living with parents divorced/separated, in reconstructed families, and with single parents had a 3-fold higher SA risk than those living in intact families. Over 63% of the risk was explained by socioeconomic, school, and health-related difficulties. No family disparities were observed among boys. Girls had a 1.74-time higher SA risk than boys, and 45% of the risk was explained by socioeconomic, school, and mental difficulties and violence. SA prevention should be performed in early adolescence and consider gender and family differences and the role of socioeconomic, school, and health-related difficulties.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Frequency of subjects in various family structures with no suicide attempt according to age (year) among boys and girls. The log-rank test for equality of the “survivor functions” (for suicide attempt) was nonsignificant for boys (P = 0.279) and highly significant for girls (P < 0.0001).
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fig1: Frequency of subjects in various family structures with no suicide attempt according to age (year) among boys and girls. The log-rank test for equality of the “survivor functions” (for suicide attempt) was nonsignificant for boys (P = 0.279) and highly significant for girls (P < 0.0001).

Mentions: SA affected 12.5% of girls and 7.2% of boys (P < 0.001). The mean age at first SA was 10.2 (SD 2.3) years for boys and 11.8 (SD 1.9) years for girls (P < 0.001). During the observation period from birth to the day of survey (14,530 person-years), 98 SA among girls and 56 SA among boys were observed. Table 2 shows that the lifetime prevalence and the crude rate of SA (per 1,000 person-years) were 3-fold higher among girls living with parents divorced/separated, in reconstructed families or with single parents (crude rates 23.2 and 23.4 per 1,000 person-years) compared with those living in intact families (crude rate 7.8 per 1,000 person-years). These differences were not observed among boys. Similar results were found for multiple suicide attempts. These family disparities were observed since an early age (Figure 1). The mean adolescent's age at parents' separation/divorce and parent's death were, respectively, 6.2 (SD 3.9, range 0–16) and 7.7 (SD 3.9, range 0–14). Table 2 further shows that living in non-intact families was associated with low parents' education, being immigrant, low father's occupation, insufficient family income, poor social support, grade repetition, depressive symptoms, and tobacco and cannabis use for both genders. Being victim of sexual abuse and alcohol and hard drug use were associated with living in nonintact families among girls only. The adolescents living with parents divorced/separated and in reconstructed families had the poorest social support for both genders.


Gender and family disparities in suicide attempt and role of socioeconomic, school, and health-related difficulties in early adolescence.

Chau K, Kabuth B, Chau N - Biomed Res Int (2014)

Frequency of subjects in various family structures with no suicide attempt according to age (year) among boys and girls. The log-rank test for equality of the “survivor functions” (for suicide attempt) was nonsignificant for boys (P = 0.279) and highly significant for girls (P < 0.0001).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4127271&req=5

fig1: Frequency of subjects in various family structures with no suicide attempt according to age (year) among boys and girls. The log-rank test for equality of the “survivor functions” (for suicide attempt) was nonsignificant for boys (P = 0.279) and highly significant for girls (P < 0.0001).
Mentions: SA affected 12.5% of girls and 7.2% of boys (P < 0.001). The mean age at first SA was 10.2 (SD 2.3) years for boys and 11.8 (SD 1.9) years for girls (P < 0.001). During the observation period from birth to the day of survey (14,530 person-years), 98 SA among girls and 56 SA among boys were observed. Table 2 shows that the lifetime prevalence and the crude rate of SA (per 1,000 person-years) were 3-fold higher among girls living with parents divorced/separated, in reconstructed families or with single parents (crude rates 23.2 and 23.4 per 1,000 person-years) compared with those living in intact families (crude rate 7.8 per 1,000 person-years). These differences were not observed among boys. Similar results were found for multiple suicide attempts. These family disparities were observed since an early age (Figure 1). The mean adolescent's age at parents' separation/divorce and parent's death were, respectively, 6.2 (SD 3.9, range 0–16) and 7.7 (SD 3.9, range 0–14). Table 2 further shows that living in non-intact families was associated with low parents' education, being immigrant, low father's occupation, insufficient family income, poor social support, grade repetition, depressive symptoms, and tobacco and cannabis use for both genders. Being victim of sexual abuse and alcohol and hard drug use were associated with living in nonintact families among girls only. The adolescents living with parents divorced/separated and in reconstructed families had the poorest social support for both genders.

Bottom Line: No family disparities were observed among boys.Girls had a 1.74-time higher SA risk than boys, and 45% of the risk was explained by socioeconomic, school, and mental difficulties and violence.SA prevention should be performed in early adolescence and consider gender and family differences and the role of socioeconomic, school, and health-related difficulties.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Service de Médecine Générale, Faculty of Medicine, Lorraine University, 9 Avenue de la Forêt de Haye, BP 184, 54505 Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy Cedex, France.

ABSTRACT
Suicide attempt (SA) is common in early adolescence and the risk may differ between boys and girls in nonintact families partly because of socioeconomic, school, and health-related difficulties. This study explored the gender and family disparities and the role of these covariates. Questionnaires were completed by 1,559 middle-school adolescents from north-eastern France including sex, age, socioeconomic factors (family structure, nationality, parents' education, father's occupation, family income, and social support), grade repetition, depressive symptoms, sustained violence, sexual abuse, unhealthy behaviors (tobacco/alcohol/cannabis/hard drug use), SA, and their first occurrence over adolescent's life course. Data were analyzed using Cox regression models. SA affected 12.5% of girls and 7.2% of boys (P < 0.001). The girls living with parents divorced/separated, in reconstructed families, and with single parents had a 3-fold higher SA risk than those living in intact families. Over 63% of the risk was explained by socioeconomic, school, and health-related difficulties. No family disparities were observed among boys. Girls had a 1.74-time higher SA risk than boys, and 45% of the risk was explained by socioeconomic, school, and mental difficulties and violence. SA prevention should be performed in early adolescence and consider gender and family differences and the role of socioeconomic, school, and health-related difficulties.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus