Limits...
Preclinical and clinical effects of mistletoe against breast cancer.

Marvibaigi M, Supriyanto E, Amini N, Abdul Majid FA, Jaganathan SK - Biomed Res Int (2014)

Bottom Line: Current conventional treatment options are accompanied by side effects.Mistletoe is amongst the important herbal medicines traditionally used as complementary remedies.An increasing number of studies have reported anticancer activity of mistletoe extracts on breast cancer cells and animal models.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: IJN-UTM Cardiovascular Engineering Center, Faculty of Biosciences and Medical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 Skudai, Johor, Malaysia.

ABSTRACT
Breast cancer is among the most frequent types of cancer in women worldwide. Current conventional treatment options are accompanied by side effects. Mistletoe is amongst the important herbal medicines traditionally used as complementary remedies. An increasing number of studies have reported anticancer activity of mistletoe extracts on breast cancer cells and animal models. Some recent evidence suggests that cytotoxic activity of mistletoe may be mediated through different mechanisms. These findings provide a good base for clinical trials. Various studies on mistletoe therapy for breast cancer patients revealed similar findings concerning possible benefits on survival time, health-related quality of life (HRQoL), remission rate, and alleviating adverse reactions to conventional therapy. This review provides an overview of the recent findings on preclinical experiments and clinical trials of mistletoe for its cytotoxic and antitumor activity and its effect on HRQoL in breast cancer patients. Moreover, studies investigating molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying antitumor activity of mistletoe are discussed in this paper. The analyzed trials provided evidence that there might be a combination of pharmacological and motivational aspects mediated by the mistletoe extract application which may contribute to the clinical benefit and positive outcome such as improved HRQoL and self-regulation in breast cancer patients.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Location of growth and scientific names of mistletoes belonging to Loranthaceae family.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4127267&req=5

fig2: Location of growth and scientific names of mistletoes belonging to Loranthaceae family.

Mentions: Mistletoe is an evergreen semiparasitic shrub (Figure 1) from the Viscaceae (Loranthaceae) family with various types which can grow on the branches of different deciduous trees like tea, apple, pine, mango, lime, larch, pear, oak, and some other plants [21, 22]. Worldwide, approximately 1500 species of mistletoe have been identified [22]. As depicted in Figures 2 and 3 various kinds of mistletoe have been selected by researchers to study their anticancer effect. Mistletoe contains different types of biological active compounds such as carbohydrates, fats, amino acids, oligosaccharides, polysaccharides, enzyme, flavonoid, glycoprotein (lectin MLT), polypeptide (viscotoxin), vesicles, and triterpene acids [23–29]. The chemical composition of mistletoe varies depending on the techniques of extract preparation, season and time of harvesting, commercial producer, stage of growth of the plant, location, and species of host tree [30, 31]. Lectins (ML-I, ML-II, and ML-III) are the main constituents of mistletoe which are responsible for its antitumor and immunomodulatory effects [32–34]. Today, most researchers have focused their studies on mistletoe lectins, particularly mistletoe lectin I (ML-I). The mistletoe lectins are glycoproteins belonging to the ribosome inactivating proteins family type II. They consist of an A-chain of 254 amino acids (MW 28.480 kDa) and a B-chain of 264 amino acids (MW 28.960 kDa) connected to each other by a disulphide bridge [35].


Preclinical and clinical effects of mistletoe against breast cancer.

Marvibaigi M, Supriyanto E, Amini N, Abdul Majid FA, Jaganathan SK - Biomed Res Int (2014)

Location of growth and scientific names of mistletoes belonging to Loranthaceae family.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4127267&req=5

fig2: Location of growth and scientific names of mistletoes belonging to Loranthaceae family.
Mentions: Mistletoe is an evergreen semiparasitic shrub (Figure 1) from the Viscaceae (Loranthaceae) family with various types which can grow on the branches of different deciduous trees like tea, apple, pine, mango, lime, larch, pear, oak, and some other plants [21, 22]. Worldwide, approximately 1500 species of mistletoe have been identified [22]. As depicted in Figures 2 and 3 various kinds of mistletoe have been selected by researchers to study their anticancer effect. Mistletoe contains different types of biological active compounds such as carbohydrates, fats, amino acids, oligosaccharides, polysaccharides, enzyme, flavonoid, glycoprotein (lectin MLT), polypeptide (viscotoxin), vesicles, and triterpene acids [23–29]. The chemical composition of mistletoe varies depending on the techniques of extract preparation, season and time of harvesting, commercial producer, stage of growth of the plant, location, and species of host tree [30, 31]. Lectins (ML-I, ML-II, and ML-III) are the main constituents of mistletoe which are responsible for its antitumor and immunomodulatory effects [32–34]. Today, most researchers have focused their studies on mistletoe lectins, particularly mistletoe lectin I (ML-I). The mistletoe lectins are glycoproteins belonging to the ribosome inactivating proteins family type II. They consist of an A-chain of 254 amino acids (MW 28.480 kDa) and a B-chain of 264 amino acids (MW 28.960 kDa) connected to each other by a disulphide bridge [35].

Bottom Line: Current conventional treatment options are accompanied by side effects.Mistletoe is amongst the important herbal medicines traditionally used as complementary remedies.An increasing number of studies have reported anticancer activity of mistletoe extracts on breast cancer cells and animal models.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: IJN-UTM Cardiovascular Engineering Center, Faculty of Biosciences and Medical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 Skudai, Johor, Malaysia.

ABSTRACT
Breast cancer is among the most frequent types of cancer in women worldwide. Current conventional treatment options are accompanied by side effects. Mistletoe is amongst the important herbal medicines traditionally used as complementary remedies. An increasing number of studies have reported anticancer activity of mistletoe extracts on breast cancer cells and animal models. Some recent evidence suggests that cytotoxic activity of mistletoe may be mediated through different mechanisms. These findings provide a good base for clinical trials. Various studies on mistletoe therapy for breast cancer patients revealed similar findings concerning possible benefits on survival time, health-related quality of life (HRQoL), remission rate, and alleviating adverse reactions to conventional therapy. This review provides an overview of the recent findings on preclinical experiments and clinical trials of mistletoe for its cytotoxic and antitumor activity and its effect on HRQoL in breast cancer patients. Moreover, studies investigating molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying antitumor activity of mistletoe are discussed in this paper. The analyzed trials provided evidence that there might be a combination of pharmacological and motivational aspects mediated by the mistletoe extract application which may contribute to the clinical benefit and positive outcome such as improved HRQoL and self-regulation in breast cancer patients.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus