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Magnetic resonance imaging for the normal mesostenium and involvement of the mesostenium in acute pancreatitis.

Chi XX, Zhang XM, Chen TW, Tang W, Xiao B, Ji YF, Huang XH - Biomed Res Int (2014)

Bottom Line: We found that the mesenterical involvement of acute pancreatitis patients is common on MRI.The mesenterical involvement has a positive correlation with the MR severity index and the Acute Physiology and Chronic Healthy Evaluation II scoring system.It has been shown that MR can be used to visualize mesenterical involvement, which is a supplementary indicator in evaluating the severity of acute pancreatitis and local and systemic complications.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Sichuan Key Laboratory of Medical Imaging, Department of Radiology, Affiliated Hospital of North Sichuan Medical College, Nanchong, Sichuan Province 637000, China.

ABSTRACT
The main point of this paper is to study MRI findings of the normal mesostenium and the involvement of the mesostenium in acute pancreatitis and to discuss the relationship between the involvement of the mesostenium and the severity of acute pancreatitis. In clinical practice, the mesenterical involvement in acute pancreatitis was often observed on MRI in daily works, which was little recorded in the reported studies. We conducted the current study to assess the mesenterical involvement in acute pancreatitis with MRI. We found that the mesenterical involvement of acute pancreatitis patients is common on MRI. The mesenterical involvement has a positive correlation with the MR severity index and the Acute Physiology and Chronic Healthy Evaluation II scoring system. It has been shown that MR can be used to visualize mesenterical involvement, which is a supplementary indicator in evaluating the severity of acute pancreatitis and local and systemic complications.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

The jejunal veins (long arrow) and ileal veins (short arrow) showed enhancement on the coronal image (a), the jejunal arteries (b), the ileal arteries (c), and the ileocolic artery (d) showed enhancement on the coronal image. The largest jejunal draining veins showed enhancement on the coronal image (e).
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fig1: The jejunal veins (long arrow) and ileal veins (short arrow) showed enhancement on the coronal image (a), the jejunal arteries (b), the ileal arteries (c), and the ileocolic artery (d) showed enhancement on the coronal image. The largest jejunal draining veins showed enhancement on the coronal image (e).

Mentions: There were 49 cases in which the SMA and SMV were in front of the aorta abdominalis, anteroinferior to the line feed, and left-right concomitant; one case was front-back concomitant. The display rates of the jejunal and ileal arteries were 100.0% in the axial and coronal view. In the coronal view, the larger branch vessels of the mesostenium course naturally and appear to be wavelike. The mesenterical vessels appear to be radially distributed and the blood vessel edges are clear; the diameter of the mesenterical blood vessels is smaller. In the axial view, the mesenterical vessels could be located in front of or behind the corresponding intestine and could appear to be round, oval, and oblong. The coronal view could spontaneously show the line feed of the trunk of the jejunal and ileal arteries, the aortic arch, and the straight arterioles, which could help to determine the location of the mesostenium. The trunk of the jejunal and ileal arteries appears to be to the left of the inferior line feed and to discharge into the left side of the SMA; the jejunal and ileal veins discharge into the SMV. In the 50 patients, the numbers of jejunal and ileal arteries (Figure 1) were not identical. There were 5 branches in 22% (11/50) of the patients, 6 branches in 20% (10/50) of the patients, 7 branches in 32% (16/50) of the patients, 8 branches in 20% (10/50) of the patients, and 9 branches in 6% (3/50) of the patients. The display rates were 100% in the coronal view of the ileocolic artery, which appeared to be to the right of the inferior line feed and to discharge into the right side of the SMA (Figure 1). The diameter of the ileocolic artery was 2.54 ± 0.35 mm (1.9 mm~3.39 mmm). The largest jejunal draining vein appeared to be a transverse trip vessel that discharged into the left side of the SMV (Figure 1). In the 50 patients, the diameter of the largest jejunal draining vein was 5 mm–10 mm (in 90% of the patients, 45/50), less than 5 mm (in 8% of the patients, 4/50), and greater than or equal to 10 mm (in 2% of the patients, 1/50). This vein could be observed in the early and late venous phases.


Magnetic resonance imaging for the normal mesostenium and involvement of the mesostenium in acute pancreatitis.

Chi XX, Zhang XM, Chen TW, Tang W, Xiao B, Ji YF, Huang XH - Biomed Res Int (2014)

The jejunal veins (long arrow) and ileal veins (short arrow) showed enhancement on the coronal image (a), the jejunal arteries (b), the ileal arteries (c), and the ileocolic artery (d) showed enhancement on the coronal image. The largest jejunal draining veins showed enhancement on the coronal image (e).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4127251&req=5

fig1: The jejunal veins (long arrow) and ileal veins (short arrow) showed enhancement on the coronal image (a), the jejunal arteries (b), the ileal arteries (c), and the ileocolic artery (d) showed enhancement on the coronal image. The largest jejunal draining veins showed enhancement on the coronal image (e).
Mentions: There were 49 cases in which the SMA and SMV were in front of the aorta abdominalis, anteroinferior to the line feed, and left-right concomitant; one case was front-back concomitant. The display rates of the jejunal and ileal arteries were 100.0% in the axial and coronal view. In the coronal view, the larger branch vessels of the mesostenium course naturally and appear to be wavelike. The mesenterical vessels appear to be radially distributed and the blood vessel edges are clear; the diameter of the mesenterical blood vessels is smaller. In the axial view, the mesenterical vessels could be located in front of or behind the corresponding intestine and could appear to be round, oval, and oblong. The coronal view could spontaneously show the line feed of the trunk of the jejunal and ileal arteries, the aortic arch, and the straight arterioles, which could help to determine the location of the mesostenium. The trunk of the jejunal and ileal arteries appears to be to the left of the inferior line feed and to discharge into the left side of the SMA; the jejunal and ileal veins discharge into the SMV. In the 50 patients, the numbers of jejunal and ileal arteries (Figure 1) were not identical. There were 5 branches in 22% (11/50) of the patients, 6 branches in 20% (10/50) of the patients, 7 branches in 32% (16/50) of the patients, 8 branches in 20% (10/50) of the patients, and 9 branches in 6% (3/50) of the patients. The display rates were 100% in the coronal view of the ileocolic artery, which appeared to be to the right of the inferior line feed and to discharge into the right side of the SMA (Figure 1). The diameter of the ileocolic artery was 2.54 ± 0.35 mm (1.9 mm~3.39 mmm). The largest jejunal draining vein appeared to be a transverse trip vessel that discharged into the left side of the SMV (Figure 1). In the 50 patients, the diameter of the largest jejunal draining vein was 5 mm–10 mm (in 90% of the patients, 45/50), less than 5 mm (in 8% of the patients, 4/50), and greater than or equal to 10 mm (in 2% of the patients, 1/50). This vein could be observed in the early and late venous phases.

Bottom Line: We found that the mesenterical involvement of acute pancreatitis patients is common on MRI.The mesenterical involvement has a positive correlation with the MR severity index and the Acute Physiology and Chronic Healthy Evaluation II scoring system.It has been shown that MR can be used to visualize mesenterical involvement, which is a supplementary indicator in evaluating the severity of acute pancreatitis and local and systemic complications.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Sichuan Key Laboratory of Medical Imaging, Department of Radiology, Affiliated Hospital of North Sichuan Medical College, Nanchong, Sichuan Province 637000, China.

ABSTRACT
The main point of this paper is to study MRI findings of the normal mesostenium and the involvement of the mesostenium in acute pancreatitis and to discuss the relationship between the involvement of the mesostenium and the severity of acute pancreatitis. In clinical practice, the mesenterical involvement in acute pancreatitis was often observed on MRI in daily works, which was little recorded in the reported studies. We conducted the current study to assess the mesenterical involvement in acute pancreatitis with MRI. We found that the mesenterical involvement of acute pancreatitis patients is common on MRI. The mesenterical involvement has a positive correlation with the MR severity index and the Acute Physiology and Chronic Healthy Evaluation II scoring system. It has been shown that MR can be used to visualize mesenterical involvement, which is a supplementary indicator in evaluating the severity of acute pancreatitis and local and systemic complications.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus