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Early prediction of preeclampsia.

Poon LC, Nicolaides KH - Obstet Gynecol Int (2014)

Bottom Line: Effective screening for the development of early onset preeclampsia (PE) can be provided in the first-trimester of pregnancy.Screening by a combination of maternal risk factors, uterine artery Doppler, mean arterial pressure, maternal serum pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A, and placental growth factor can identify about 95% of cases of early onset PE for a false-positive rate of 10%.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Harris Birthright Research Centre of Fetal Medicine, King's College Hospital, Denmark Hill, London SE5 9RS, UK.

ABSTRACT
Effective screening for the development of early onset preeclampsia (PE) can be provided in the first-trimester of pregnancy. Screening by a combination of maternal risk factors, uterine artery Doppler, mean arterial pressure, maternal serum pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A, and placental growth factor can identify about 95% of cases of early onset PE for a false-positive rate of 10%.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Effects of maternal characteristics (with 95% confidence intervals) on the gestational age at delivery for preeclampsia. This effect is expressed as gestational weeks by which the expected gestational age at delivery for preeclampsia is altered.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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fig2: Effects of maternal characteristics (with 95% confidence intervals) on the gestational age at delivery for preeclampsia. This effect is expressed as gestational weeks by which the expected gestational age at delivery for preeclampsia is altered.

Mentions: In this competing risk model the mean gestational age for delivery with PE is 54 weeks with estimated standard deviation of 6.9 weeks. Certain variables, including advancing maternal age over 35 years, increasing weight, Afro-Caribbean and South Asian racial origin, previous pregnancy with PE, conception by in vitro fertilization (IVF) and a medical history of chronic hypertension, preexisting diabetes mellitus, and systemic lupus erythematosus or antiphospholipid syndrome, increase the risk for development of PE. The consequence of this increased risk is a shift to the left of the Gaussian distribution of the gestational age at delivery with PE (Figure 2). Estimated detection rates of PE requiring delivery before 34, 37, and 42 weeks' gestation in screening by maternal factors are about 36%, 33%, and 29%, respectively, at false-positive rate of 5%, and 51%, 43%, and 40%, respectively, at false-positive rate of 10% (Table 1) [12].


Early prediction of preeclampsia.

Poon LC, Nicolaides KH - Obstet Gynecol Int (2014)

Effects of maternal characteristics (with 95% confidence intervals) on the gestational age at delivery for preeclampsia. This effect is expressed as gestational weeks by which the expected gestational age at delivery for preeclampsia is altered.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4127237&req=5

fig2: Effects of maternal characteristics (with 95% confidence intervals) on the gestational age at delivery for preeclampsia. This effect is expressed as gestational weeks by which the expected gestational age at delivery for preeclampsia is altered.
Mentions: In this competing risk model the mean gestational age for delivery with PE is 54 weeks with estimated standard deviation of 6.9 weeks. Certain variables, including advancing maternal age over 35 years, increasing weight, Afro-Caribbean and South Asian racial origin, previous pregnancy with PE, conception by in vitro fertilization (IVF) and a medical history of chronic hypertension, preexisting diabetes mellitus, and systemic lupus erythematosus or antiphospholipid syndrome, increase the risk for development of PE. The consequence of this increased risk is a shift to the left of the Gaussian distribution of the gestational age at delivery with PE (Figure 2). Estimated detection rates of PE requiring delivery before 34, 37, and 42 weeks' gestation in screening by maternal factors are about 36%, 33%, and 29%, respectively, at false-positive rate of 5%, and 51%, 43%, and 40%, respectively, at false-positive rate of 10% (Table 1) [12].

Bottom Line: Effective screening for the development of early onset preeclampsia (PE) can be provided in the first-trimester of pregnancy.Screening by a combination of maternal risk factors, uterine artery Doppler, mean arterial pressure, maternal serum pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A, and placental growth factor can identify about 95% of cases of early onset PE for a false-positive rate of 10%.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Harris Birthright Research Centre of Fetal Medicine, King's College Hospital, Denmark Hill, London SE5 9RS, UK.

ABSTRACT
Effective screening for the development of early onset preeclampsia (PE) can be provided in the first-trimester of pregnancy. Screening by a combination of maternal risk factors, uterine artery Doppler, mean arterial pressure, maternal serum pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A, and placental growth factor can identify about 95% of cases of early onset PE for a false-positive rate of 10%.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus