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The role of antioxidant enzymes in adaptive responses to sheath blight infestation under different fertilization rates and hill densities.

Wu W, Wan X, Shah F, Fahad S, Huang J - ScientificWorldJournal (2014)

Bottom Line: No rice cultivar has been found to be completely resistant to this fungus.Dense planting caused higher lesion length resulting in a higher MDA content, which also subsequently stimulated higher POD and SOD activity.Sheath blight severity was significantly related to the activity of antioxidant enzyme during both seasons.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: College of Agronomy, Northwest A&F University, Yangling, Shaanxi 712100, China ; National Key Laboratory of Crop Genetic Improvement, MOA Key Laboratory of Crop Physiology, Ecology and Cultivation (The Middle Reaches of Yangtze River), College of Plant Science and Technology, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan, Hubei 430070, China.

ABSTRACT
Sheath blight of rice, caused by Rhizoctonia solani, is one of the most devastating rice diseases worldwide. No rice cultivar has been found to be completely resistant to this fungus. Identifying antioxidant enzymes activities (activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POD), and catalase (CAT)) and malondialdehyde content (MDA) responding to sheath blight infestation is imperative to understand the defensive mechanism systems of rice. In the present study, two inoculation methods (toothpick and agar block method) were tested in double-season rice. Toothpick method had greater lesion length than agar block method in late season. A higher MDA content was found under toothpick method compared with agar block method, which led to greater POD and SOD activities. Dense planting caused higher lesion length resulting in a higher MDA content, which also subsequently stimulated higher POD and SOD activity. Sheath blight severity was significantly related to the activity of antioxidant enzyme during both seasons. The present study implies that rice plants possess a system of antioxidant protective enzymes which helps them in adaptation to sheath blight infection stresses. Several agronomic practices, such as rational use of fertilizers and optimum planting density, involved in regulating antioxidant protective enzyme systems can be regarded as promising strategy to suppress the sheath blight development.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Lesion length as affected by (a) different inoculation methods, (b) fertilization rates, and (c) hill densities in double-season rice. Vertical bars indicate standard error. ∗ indicates significant difference between treatments according to LSD (0.05).
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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fig1: Lesion length as affected by (a) different inoculation methods, (b) fertilization rates, and (c) hill densities in double-season rice. Vertical bars indicate standard error. ∗ indicates significant difference between treatments according to LSD (0.05).

Mentions: The data were subjected to an analysis of variance for each season [18]. In each season, the variance of lesion length among different treatments was analysed using a split-split-plot design with fertilisation rate as main plot, hill density as the subplot treatment, and inoculation methods as sub-subplots (microplot). Because the two- or three-way interactive effects among fertilisation rate, hill densities, and inoculation treatments on lesion length were not significant (data not shown), these traits shown in Figure 1 represent the mean data across the other two treatments. Data for antioxidant enzyme activities (POD, CAT, and SOD) and MDA content were averaged across the two seasons. Relationships of lesion length to POD, CAT, SOD, and MDA for both seasons were evaluated using correlation analyses [19]. The means among treatments were compared using the least significant difference test (LSD) at a probability level of 0.05.


The role of antioxidant enzymes in adaptive responses to sheath blight infestation under different fertilization rates and hill densities.

Wu W, Wan X, Shah F, Fahad S, Huang J - ScientificWorldJournal (2014)

Lesion length as affected by (a) different inoculation methods, (b) fertilization rates, and (c) hill densities in double-season rice. Vertical bars indicate standard error. ∗ indicates significant difference between treatments according to LSD (0.05).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4127202&req=5

fig1: Lesion length as affected by (a) different inoculation methods, (b) fertilization rates, and (c) hill densities in double-season rice. Vertical bars indicate standard error. ∗ indicates significant difference between treatments according to LSD (0.05).
Mentions: The data were subjected to an analysis of variance for each season [18]. In each season, the variance of lesion length among different treatments was analysed using a split-split-plot design with fertilisation rate as main plot, hill density as the subplot treatment, and inoculation methods as sub-subplots (microplot). Because the two- or three-way interactive effects among fertilisation rate, hill densities, and inoculation treatments on lesion length were not significant (data not shown), these traits shown in Figure 1 represent the mean data across the other two treatments. Data for antioxidant enzyme activities (POD, CAT, and SOD) and MDA content were averaged across the two seasons. Relationships of lesion length to POD, CAT, SOD, and MDA for both seasons were evaluated using correlation analyses [19]. The means among treatments were compared using the least significant difference test (LSD) at a probability level of 0.05.

Bottom Line: No rice cultivar has been found to be completely resistant to this fungus.Dense planting caused higher lesion length resulting in a higher MDA content, which also subsequently stimulated higher POD and SOD activity.Sheath blight severity was significantly related to the activity of antioxidant enzyme during both seasons.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: College of Agronomy, Northwest A&F University, Yangling, Shaanxi 712100, China ; National Key Laboratory of Crop Genetic Improvement, MOA Key Laboratory of Crop Physiology, Ecology and Cultivation (The Middle Reaches of Yangtze River), College of Plant Science and Technology, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan, Hubei 430070, China.

ABSTRACT
Sheath blight of rice, caused by Rhizoctonia solani, is one of the most devastating rice diseases worldwide. No rice cultivar has been found to be completely resistant to this fungus. Identifying antioxidant enzymes activities (activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POD), and catalase (CAT)) and malondialdehyde content (MDA) responding to sheath blight infestation is imperative to understand the defensive mechanism systems of rice. In the present study, two inoculation methods (toothpick and agar block method) were tested in double-season rice. Toothpick method had greater lesion length than agar block method in late season. A higher MDA content was found under toothpick method compared with agar block method, which led to greater POD and SOD activities. Dense planting caused higher lesion length resulting in a higher MDA content, which also subsequently stimulated higher POD and SOD activity. Sheath blight severity was significantly related to the activity of antioxidant enzyme during both seasons. The present study implies that rice plants possess a system of antioxidant protective enzymes which helps them in adaptation to sheath blight infection stresses. Several agronomic practices, such as rational use of fertilizers and optimum planting density, involved in regulating antioxidant protective enzyme systems can be regarded as promising strategy to suppress the sheath blight development.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus