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Relationship between bladder cancer and total fluid intake: a meta-analysis of epidemiological evidence.

Bai Y, Yuan H, Li J, Tang Y, Pu C, Han P - World J Surg Oncol (2014)

Bottom Line: A random-effect model was used to summarize the estimates of odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI).In the subgroup analyses, the overall ORs for coffee, green, and black tea intake were 1.17 (95% CI: 1.03-1.33), 0.76 (95% CI: 0.66-0.95), and 0.80 (95% CI: 0.65-0.97), respectively.A significantly decreased risk was observed in Asian people (OR 0.27; 95% CI: 0.10-0.72).

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Urology, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Guoxue Xiang#37, Chengdu, Sichuan 610041, China. hanpingwch@163.com.

ABSTRACT

Objectives: Epidemiological findings regarding the association between total fluid intake and bladder cancer risk have yielded varying results. Our objective is to examine the possible associations between total fluid intake and bladder cancer risk.

Methods: Databases searched include the EMBASE and PUBMED, from inception to February 2014, with no limits on study language. We also reviewed the reference lists of identified studies. Stratified analyses were performed. A random-effect model was used to summarize the estimates of odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI).

Results: Overall,17 case-control and four cohort studies were included. The overall OR of bladder cancer for the highest versus the lowest fluid intake was 1.06 (95% CI: 0.88-1.27). In the subgroup analyses, the overall ORs for coffee, green, and black tea intake were 1.17 (95% CI: 1.03-1.33), 0.76 (95% CI: 0.66-0.95), and 0.80 (95% CI: 0.65-0.97), respectively. A significantly decreased risk was observed in Asian people (OR 0.27; 95% CI: 0.10-0.72). Among smokers, a suggestive inverse association was observed between total fluid intake and overall bladder cancer risk (OR 0.80; 95% CI: 0.62-1.02).

Conclusions: Although this meta-analysis suggested that greater consumption of fluid may have a protective effect on bladder cancer in Asian people, there was no convincing evidence on this association because of the limitations of the individual trials.

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Flow diagram of studies identified, included, and excluded.
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Figure 1: Flow diagram of studies identified, included, and excluded.

Mentions: Using the predefined search strategies, we ultimately included 21 articles [9,10,19-37] that investigated the association of total fluid intake with bladder cancer risk, including 17 case-control [9,10,19-33] and four cohort studies [34-37]. The flow diagram (Figure 1) showed the detailed literature search steps. Among the 17 case-control studies, 9 studies [10,21,23,25,27-29,31,33] reported 2 separate outcomes (male and female). Of the four cohort studies, one study [36] reported two separate outcomes (male and female). Six studies [10,21,29,34-36] were eligible for pooling estimates of total fluid intake among non-smokers (three cohort studies). Baseline characteristics of the eligible studies are presented in Tables 1 and 2. Of these studies, 17 [10,19,23-36] were conducted in Europe and North America (9 in the United States, 8 in other countries) and 4 [10,20-22] in Asia.


Relationship between bladder cancer and total fluid intake: a meta-analysis of epidemiological evidence.

Bai Y, Yuan H, Li J, Tang Y, Pu C, Han P - World J Surg Oncol (2014)

Flow diagram of studies identified, included, and excluded.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4127191&req=5

Figure 1: Flow diagram of studies identified, included, and excluded.
Mentions: Using the predefined search strategies, we ultimately included 21 articles [9,10,19-37] that investigated the association of total fluid intake with bladder cancer risk, including 17 case-control [9,10,19-33] and four cohort studies [34-37]. The flow diagram (Figure 1) showed the detailed literature search steps. Among the 17 case-control studies, 9 studies [10,21,23,25,27-29,31,33] reported 2 separate outcomes (male and female). Of the four cohort studies, one study [36] reported two separate outcomes (male and female). Six studies [10,21,29,34-36] were eligible for pooling estimates of total fluid intake among non-smokers (three cohort studies). Baseline characteristics of the eligible studies are presented in Tables 1 and 2. Of these studies, 17 [10,19,23-36] were conducted in Europe and North America (9 in the United States, 8 in other countries) and 4 [10,20-22] in Asia.

Bottom Line: A random-effect model was used to summarize the estimates of odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI).In the subgroup analyses, the overall ORs for coffee, green, and black tea intake were 1.17 (95% CI: 1.03-1.33), 0.76 (95% CI: 0.66-0.95), and 0.80 (95% CI: 0.65-0.97), respectively.A significantly decreased risk was observed in Asian people (OR 0.27; 95% CI: 0.10-0.72).

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Urology, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Guoxue Xiang#37, Chengdu, Sichuan 610041, China. hanpingwch@163.com.

ABSTRACT

Objectives: Epidemiological findings regarding the association between total fluid intake and bladder cancer risk have yielded varying results. Our objective is to examine the possible associations between total fluid intake and bladder cancer risk.

Methods: Databases searched include the EMBASE and PUBMED, from inception to February 2014, with no limits on study language. We also reviewed the reference lists of identified studies. Stratified analyses were performed. A random-effect model was used to summarize the estimates of odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI).

Results: Overall,17 case-control and four cohort studies were included. The overall OR of bladder cancer for the highest versus the lowest fluid intake was 1.06 (95% CI: 0.88-1.27). In the subgroup analyses, the overall ORs for coffee, green, and black tea intake were 1.17 (95% CI: 1.03-1.33), 0.76 (95% CI: 0.66-0.95), and 0.80 (95% CI: 0.65-0.97), respectively. A significantly decreased risk was observed in Asian people (OR 0.27; 95% CI: 0.10-0.72). Among smokers, a suggestive inverse association was observed between total fluid intake and overall bladder cancer risk (OR 0.80; 95% CI: 0.62-1.02).

Conclusions: Although this meta-analysis suggested that greater consumption of fluid may have a protective effect on bladder cancer in Asian people, there was no convincing evidence on this association because of the limitations of the individual trials.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus