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Patients' blood pressure knowledge, perceptions and monitoring practices in community pharmacies.

Lam JY, Guirguis LM - Pharm Pract (Granada) (2010)

Bottom Line: This study along with others before it point to the knowledge and self-management gaps in patients with chronic conditions.Furthermore, pharmacy students were able to use a brief intervention to screen patients during routine care.Pharmacists can help improve patient understanding and promote increased self-management through regular BP monitoring.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Student of Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Alberta . Edmonton ( Canada ).

ABSTRACT

Unlabelled: Hypertension is a modifiable risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Despite this, patients often cannot or inaccurately estimate their risk factors.

Objectives: IN ORDER TO IMPROVE PHARMACIST INTERVENTIONS, WE SOUGHT TO: 1) find out patients' knowledge about blood pressure (BP) and their self-monitoring behaviors and 2) identify the relationships between these two elements. Specifically, if evaluation of BP control were related to knowledge of one's BP level and self-monitoring habits, and if knowledge of one's target and BP level varied with monitoring habits.

Methods: Final year pharmacy students were trained and interviewed patients in community pharmacies as a required exercise in their pharmacy clerkship. Each student recruited a convenience sample of 5-10 patients who were on hypertension medication, and surveyed them regarding their BP targets, recent BP levels as well as monthly and home BP monitoring practices.

Results: One third of the 449 patients interviewed were able to report a blood pressure target with 26% reporting a JNC 7 recognized target. Three quarters of patients who reported a blood pressure target were able to report a blood pressure level, with 12% being at their self-reported target. Roughly two thirds of patients perceived their BP to be "about right", and slightly less than a third thought it to be "high". Sixty percent of patients monitor their BP monthly, but less than 50% of patients practice home BP monitoring.

Conclusions: This study along with others before it point to the knowledge and self-management gaps in patients with chronic conditions. Furthermore, pharmacy students were able to use a brief intervention to screen patients during routine care. Pharmacists can help improve patient understanding and promote increased self-management through regular BP monitoring.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Blood pressure project participation * Insignificant diabetic population size
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Related In: Results  -  Collection

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Figure 1: Blood pressure project participation * Insignificant diabetic population size

Mentions: Data were gathered by students completing their community pharmacy clerkship at 39 sites in Wisconsin. 120 students approached 716 patients and of those 620 had time to talk and 449 patients consented to participate in the study (see Figure 1). Only 2 patients were diabetic, which is lower than the expected prevalence of 5-10%. However in the prior year, students had approached patients regarding awareness of diabetes targets and thus patients with diabetes may have been passed over in the BP check. Thus, the data for the 2 patients with diabetes was removed, as an analysis of this subgroup would not be meaningful. Furthermore, 38 patients who received the BP check at least once before had their second BP check presented separately. There were no statistical differences between patient reports in the first and second BP checks (see Tables 1 to 3).


Patients' blood pressure knowledge, perceptions and monitoring practices in community pharmacies.

Lam JY, Guirguis LM - Pharm Pract (Granada) (2010)

Blood pressure project participation * Insignificant diabetic population size
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4127054&req=5

Figure 1: Blood pressure project participation * Insignificant diabetic population size
Mentions: Data were gathered by students completing their community pharmacy clerkship at 39 sites in Wisconsin. 120 students approached 716 patients and of those 620 had time to talk and 449 patients consented to participate in the study (see Figure 1). Only 2 patients were diabetic, which is lower than the expected prevalence of 5-10%. However in the prior year, students had approached patients regarding awareness of diabetes targets and thus patients with diabetes may have been passed over in the BP check. Thus, the data for the 2 patients with diabetes was removed, as an analysis of this subgroup would not be meaningful. Furthermore, 38 patients who received the BP check at least once before had their second BP check presented separately. There were no statistical differences between patient reports in the first and second BP checks (see Tables 1 to 3).

Bottom Line: This study along with others before it point to the knowledge and self-management gaps in patients with chronic conditions.Furthermore, pharmacy students were able to use a brief intervention to screen patients during routine care.Pharmacists can help improve patient understanding and promote increased self-management through regular BP monitoring.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Student of Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Alberta . Edmonton ( Canada ).

ABSTRACT

Unlabelled: Hypertension is a modifiable risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Despite this, patients often cannot or inaccurately estimate their risk factors.

Objectives: IN ORDER TO IMPROVE PHARMACIST INTERVENTIONS, WE SOUGHT TO: 1) find out patients' knowledge about blood pressure (BP) and their self-monitoring behaviors and 2) identify the relationships between these two elements. Specifically, if evaluation of BP control were related to knowledge of one's BP level and self-monitoring habits, and if knowledge of one's target and BP level varied with monitoring habits.

Methods: Final year pharmacy students were trained and interviewed patients in community pharmacies as a required exercise in their pharmacy clerkship. Each student recruited a convenience sample of 5-10 patients who were on hypertension medication, and surveyed them regarding their BP targets, recent BP levels as well as monthly and home BP monitoring practices.

Results: One third of the 449 patients interviewed were able to report a blood pressure target with 26% reporting a JNC 7 recognized target. Three quarters of patients who reported a blood pressure target were able to report a blood pressure level, with 12% being at their self-reported target. Roughly two thirds of patients perceived their BP to be "about right", and slightly less than a third thought it to be "high". Sixty percent of patients monitor their BP monthly, but less than 50% of patients practice home BP monitoring.

Conclusions: This study along with others before it point to the knowledge and self-management gaps in patients with chronic conditions. Furthermore, pharmacy students were able to use a brief intervention to screen patients during routine care. Pharmacists can help improve patient understanding and promote increased self-management through regular BP monitoring.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus