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Resistance training after myocardial infarction in rats: its role on cardiac and autonomic function.

Grans CF, Feriani DJ, Abssamra ME, Rocha LY, Carrozzi NM, Mostarda C, Figueroa DM, Angelis KD, Irigoyen MC, Rodrigues B - Arq. Bras. Cardiol. (2014)

Bottom Line: The animals underwent maximum load test and echocardiography at the beginning and at the end of the resistance exercise training (in an adapted ladder, 40% to 60% of the maximum load test, 3 months, 5 days/week).The maximum load test increased in groups trained control (+32%) and trained infarcted (+46%) in relation to groups sedentary control and sedentary infarcted.Resistance exercise training alone may be an important and safe tool in the management of patients after myocardial infarction, considering that it does not lead to significant changes in the ventricular function, reduces the global cardiac stress, and significantly improves the vascular and cardiac autonomic modulation in infarcted rats.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratório do Movimento Humano, Universidade São Judas Tadeu, São Paulo, SP, Brazil.

ABSTRACT

Background: Although resistance exercise training is part of cardiovascular rehabilitation programs, little is known about its role on the cardiac and autonomic function after myocardial infarction.

Objective: To evaluate the effects of resistance exercise training, started early after myocardial infarction, on cardiac function, hemodynamic profile, and autonomic modulation in rats.

Methods: Male Wistar rats were divided into four groups: sedentary control, trained control, sedentary infarcted and trained infarcted rats. Each group with n = 9 rats. The animals underwent maximum load test and echocardiography at the beginning and at the end of the resistance exercise training (in an adapted ladder, 40% to 60% of the maximum load test, 3 months, 5 days/week). At the end, hemodynamic, baroreflex sensitivity and autonomic modulation assessments were made.

Results: The maximum load test increased in groups trained control (+32%) and trained infarcted (+46%) in relation to groups sedentary control and sedentary infarcted. Although no change occurred regarding the myocardial infarction size and systolic function, the E/A ratio (-23%), myocardial performance index (-39%) and systolic blood pressure (+6%) improved with resistance exercise training in group trained infarcted. Concomitantly, the training provided additional benefits in the high frequency bands of the pulse interval (+45%), as well as in the low frequency band of systolic blood pressure (-46%) in rats from group trained infarcted in relation to group sedentary infarcted.

Conclusion: Resistance exercise training alone may be an important and safe tool in the management of patients after myocardial infarction, considering that it does not lead to significant changes in the ventricular function, reduces the global cardiac stress, and significantly improves the vascular and cardiac autonomic modulation in infarcted rats.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Values of the maximum load test in groups sedentary control (SC), trainedcontrol (TC), sedentary infarcted (SI), and trained infarcted (TI). # p <0.05 vs. baseline assessment; * p < 0.05 vs. SC; ‡ p < 0.05 vs. TC; † p< 0.05 vs. SI.
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f01: Values of the maximum load test in groups sedentary control (SC), trainedcontrol (TC), sedentary infarcted (SI), and trained infarcted (TI). # p <0.05 vs. baseline assessment; * p < 0.05 vs. SC; ‡ p < 0.05 vs. TC; † p< 0.05 vs. SI.

Mentions: At baseline, the infarcted animals (SI and TI) showed a reduction of MLT incomparison to non-infarcted animals (SC and TC). After the RT or follow-up period,the trained groups (TC and TI) showed increased MLT values in relation to theirbaseline assessments and in comparison to the respective controls (SC and SI) (Figure 1). However, group TI remained with reducedMLT values in relation to TC at the end of the study. In MLT, there was interactionbetween the assessment moments and the experimental groups (F = 72.402; p <0.001).


Resistance training after myocardial infarction in rats: its role on cardiac and autonomic function.

Grans CF, Feriani DJ, Abssamra ME, Rocha LY, Carrozzi NM, Mostarda C, Figueroa DM, Angelis KD, Irigoyen MC, Rodrigues B - Arq. Bras. Cardiol. (2014)

Values of the maximum load test in groups sedentary control (SC), trainedcontrol (TC), sedentary infarcted (SI), and trained infarcted (TI). # p <0.05 vs. baseline assessment; * p < 0.05 vs. SC; ‡ p < 0.05 vs. TC; † p< 0.05 vs. SI.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4126762&req=5

f01: Values of the maximum load test in groups sedentary control (SC), trainedcontrol (TC), sedentary infarcted (SI), and trained infarcted (TI). # p <0.05 vs. baseline assessment; * p < 0.05 vs. SC; ‡ p < 0.05 vs. TC; † p< 0.05 vs. SI.
Mentions: At baseline, the infarcted animals (SI and TI) showed a reduction of MLT incomparison to non-infarcted animals (SC and TC). After the RT or follow-up period,the trained groups (TC and TI) showed increased MLT values in relation to theirbaseline assessments and in comparison to the respective controls (SC and SI) (Figure 1). However, group TI remained with reducedMLT values in relation to TC at the end of the study. In MLT, there was interactionbetween the assessment moments and the experimental groups (F = 72.402; p <0.001).

Bottom Line: The animals underwent maximum load test and echocardiography at the beginning and at the end of the resistance exercise training (in an adapted ladder, 40% to 60% of the maximum load test, 3 months, 5 days/week).The maximum load test increased in groups trained control (+32%) and trained infarcted (+46%) in relation to groups sedentary control and sedentary infarcted.Resistance exercise training alone may be an important and safe tool in the management of patients after myocardial infarction, considering that it does not lead to significant changes in the ventricular function, reduces the global cardiac stress, and significantly improves the vascular and cardiac autonomic modulation in infarcted rats.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratório do Movimento Humano, Universidade São Judas Tadeu, São Paulo, SP, Brazil.

ABSTRACT

Background: Although resistance exercise training is part of cardiovascular rehabilitation programs, little is known about its role on the cardiac and autonomic function after myocardial infarction.

Objective: To evaluate the effects of resistance exercise training, started early after myocardial infarction, on cardiac function, hemodynamic profile, and autonomic modulation in rats.

Methods: Male Wistar rats were divided into four groups: sedentary control, trained control, sedentary infarcted and trained infarcted rats. Each group with n = 9 rats. The animals underwent maximum load test and echocardiography at the beginning and at the end of the resistance exercise training (in an adapted ladder, 40% to 60% of the maximum load test, 3 months, 5 days/week). At the end, hemodynamic, baroreflex sensitivity and autonomic modulation assessments were made.

Results: The maximum load test increased in groups trained control (+32%) and trained infarcted (+46%) in relation to groups sedentary control and sedentary infarcted. Although no change occurred regarding the myocardial infarction size and systolic function, the E/A ratio (-23%), myocardial performance index (-39%) and systolic blood pressure (+6%) improved with resistance exercise training in group trained infarcted. Concomitantly, the training provided additional benefits in the high frequency bands of the pulse interval (+45%), as well as in the low frequency band of systolic blood pressure (-46%) in rats from group trained infarcted in relation to group sedentary infarcted.

Conclusion: Resistance exercise training alone may be an important and safe tool in the management of patients after myocardial infarction, considering that it does not lead to significant changes in the ventricular function, reduces the global cardiac stress, and significantly improves the vascular and cardiac autonomic modulation in infarcted rats.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus