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Resistance exercise restores endothelial function and reduces blood pressure in type 1 diabetic rats.

Mota MM, Silva TL, Fontes MT, Barreto AS, Araújo JE, Oliveira AC, Wichi RB, Santos MR - Arq. Bras. Cardiol. (2014)

Bottom Line: A significant reduction in the maximum response of acetylcholine-induced relaxation was observed in the sedentary diabetic group (78.1 ± 2%) and an increase in the trained diabetic group (95 ± 3%) without changing potency.In the presence of NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, the acetylcholine-induced relaxation was significantly reduced in the control and trained diabetic groups, but not in the sedentary diabetic group.However, the trained diabetic group showed a significant decrease (p < 0.05) in the mean arterial blood pressure levels (126.7 ± 5 to 105.1 ± 4 mmHg) as compared to the sedentary diabetic group.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Departamento de Fisiologia, Universidade Federal de Sergipe, São Cristóvão, SE, Brazil.

ABSTRACT

Background: Resistance exercise effects on cardiovascular parameters are not consistent.

Objectives: The effects of resistance exercise on changes in blood glucose, blood pressure and vascular reactivity were evaluated in diabetic rats.

Methods: Wistar rats were divided into three groups: control group (n = 8); sedentary diabetic (n = 8); and trained diabetic (n = 8). Resistance exercise was carried out in a squat device for rats and consisted of three sets of ten repetitions with an intensity of 50%, three times per week, for eight weeks. Changes in vascular reactivity were evaluated in superior mesenteric artery rings.

Results: A significant reduction in the maximum response of acetylcholine-induced relaxation was observed in the sedentary diabetic group (78.1 ± 2%) and an increase in the trained diabetic group (95 ± 3%) without changing potency. In the presence of NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, the acetylcholine-induced relaxation was significantly reduced in the control and trained diabetic groups, but not in the sedentary diabetic group. Furthermore, a significant increase (p < 0.05) in mean arterial blood pressure was observed in the sedentary diabetic group (104.9 ± 5 to 126.7 ± 5 mmHg) as compared to that in the control group. However, the trained diabetic group showed a significant decrease (p < 0.05) in the mean arterial blood pressure levels (126.7 ± 5 to 105.1 ± 4 mmHg) as compared to the sedentary diabetic group.

Conclusions: Resistance exercise could restore endothelial function and prevent an increase in arterial blood pressure in type 1 diabetic rats.

Show MeSH
Mean arterial blood pressure of rats of the groups control (C), diabeticsedentary (DS), and diabetic trained (DT) after eight weeks of resistanceexercise. Data are expressed as mean ± standard error of the mean. Thestatistical differences were determined by repeated measures analysis ofvariance followed by Bonferroni post-test. * p < 0.05 DS vs. C and # p <0.05 DT vs. DS.
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f04: Mean arterial blood pressure of rats of the groups control (C), diabeticsedentary (DS), and diabetic trained (DT) after eight weeks of resistanceexercise. Data are expressed as mean ± standard error of the mean. Thestatistical differences were determined by repeated measures analysis ofvariance followed by Bonferroni post-test. * p < 0.05 DS vs. C and # p <0.05 DT vs. DS.

Mentions: Diabetes induction with alloxan increased (p < 0.05) mean arterial blood pressurein group DS. Inversely, resistance exercise reduced (p < 0.05) arterial bloodpressure levels of group DT animals (Figure4).


Resistance exercise restores endothelial function and reduces blood pressure in type 1 diabetic rats.

Mota MM, Silva TL, Fontes MT, Barreto AS, Araújo JE, Oliveira AC, Wichi RB, Santos MR - Arq. Bras. Cardiol. (2014)

Mean arterial blood pressure of rats of the groups control (C), diabeticsedentary (DS), and diabetic trained (DT) after eight weeks of resistanceexercise. Data are expressed as mean ± standard error of the mean. Thestatistical differences were determined by repeated measures analysis ofvariance followed by Bonferroni post-test. * p < 0.05 DS vs. C and # p <0.05 DT vs. DS.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4126758&req=5

f04: Mean arterial blood pressure of rats of the groups control (C), diabeticsedentary (DS), and diabetic trained (DT) after eight weeks of resistanceexercise. Data are expressed as mean ± standard error of the mean. Thestatistical differences were determined by repeated measures analysis ofvariance followed by Bonferroni post-test. * p < 0.05 DS vs. C and # p <0.05 DT vs. DS.
Mentions: Diabetes induction with alloxan increased (p < 0.05) mean arterial blood pressurein group DS. Inversely, resistance exercise reduced (p < 0.05) arterial bloodpressure levels of group DT animals (Figure4).

Bottom Line: A significant reduction in the maximum response of acetylcholine-induced relaxation was observed in the sedentary diabetic group (78.1 ± 2%) and an increase in the trained diabetic group (95 ± 3%) without changing potency.In the presence of NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, the acetylcholine-induced relaxation was significantly reduced in the control and trained diabetic groups, but not in the sedentary diabetic group.However, the trained diabetic group showed a significant decrease (p < 0.05) in the mean arterial blood pressure levels (126.7 ± 5 to 105.1 ± 4 mmHg) as compared to the sedentary diabetic group.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Departamento de Fisiologia, Universidade Federal de Sergipe, São Cristóvão, SE, Brazil.

ABSTRACT

Background: Resistance exercise effects on cardiovascular parameters are not consistent.

Objectives: The effects of resistance exercise on changes in blood glucose, blood pressure and vascular reactivity were evaluated in diabetic rats.

Methods: Wistar rats were divided into three groups: control group (n = 8); sedentary diabetic (n = 8); and trained diabetic (n = 8). Resistance exercise was carried out in a squat device for rats and consisted of three sets of ten repetitions with an intensity of 50%, three times per week, for eight weeks. Changes in vascular reactivity were evaluated in superior mesenteric artery rings.

Results: A significant reduction in the maximum response of acetylcholine-induced relaxation was observed in the sedentary diabetic group (78.1 ± 2%) and an increase in the trained diabetic group (95 ± 3%) without changing potency. In the presence of NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, the acetylcholine-induced relaxation was significantly reduced in the control and trained diabetic groups, but not in the sedentary diabetic group. Furthermore, a significant increase (p < 0.05) in mean arterial blood pressure was observed in the sedentary diabetic group (104.9 ± 5 to 126.7 ± 5 mmHg) as compared to that in the control group. However, the trained diabetic group showed a significant decrease (p < 0.05) in the mean arterial blood pressure levels (126.7 ± 5 to 105.1 ± 4 mmHg) as compared to the sedentary diabetic group.

Conclusions: Resistance exercise could restore endothelial function and prevent an increase in arterial blood pressure in type 1 diabetic rats.

Show MeSH