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Resistance exercise restores endothelial function and reduces blood pressure in type 1 diabetic rats.

Mota MM, Silva TL, Fontes MT, Barreto AS, Araújo JE, Oliveira AC, Wichi RB, Santos MR - Arq. Bras. Cardiol. (2014)

Bottom Line: A significant reduction in the maximum response of acetylcholine-induced relaxation was observed in the sedentary diabetic group (78.1 ± 2%) and an increase in the trained diabetic group (95 ± 3%) without changing potency.In the presence of NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, the acetylcholine-induced relaxation was significantly reduced in the control and trained diabetic groups, but not in the sedentary diabetic group.However, the trained diabetic group showed a significant decrease (p < 0.05) in the mean arterial blood pressure levels (126.7 ± 5 to 105.1 ± 4 mmHg) as compared to the sedentary diabetic group.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Departamento de Fisiologia, Universidade Federal de Sergipe, São Cristóvão, SE, Brazil.

ABSTRACT

Background: Resistance exercise effects on cardiovascular parameters are not consistent.

Objectives: The effects of resistance exercise on changes in blood glucose, blood pressure and vascular reactivity were evaluated in diabetic rats.

Methods: Wistar rats were divided into three groups: control group (n = 8); sedentary diabetic (n = 8); and trained diabetic (n = 8). Resistance exercise was carried out in a squat device for rats and consisted of three sets of ten repetitions with an intensity of 50%, three times per week, for eight weeks. Changes in vascular reactivity were evaluated in superior mesenteric artery rings.

Results: A significant reduction in the maximum response of acetylcholine-induced relaxation was observed in the sedentary diabetic group (78.1 ± 2%) and an increase in the trained diabetic group (95 ± 3%) without changing potency. In the presence of NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, the acetylcholine-induced relaxation was significantly reduced in the control and trained diabetic groups, but not in the sedentary diabetic group. Furthermore, a significant increase (p < 0.05) in mean arterial blood pressure was observed in the sedentary diabetic group (104.9 ± 5 to 126.7 ± 5 mmHg) as compared to that in the control group. However, the trained diabetic group showed a significant decrease (p < 0.05) in the mean arterial blood pressure levels (126.7 ± 5 to 105.1 ± 4 mmHg) as compared to the sedentary diabetic group.

Conclusions: Resistance exercise could restore endothelial function and prevent an increase in arterial blood pressure in type 1 diabetic rats.

Show MeSH
Variation of blood glucose levels of rats at the beginning (0) and by the end(8) of eight weeks of training: control group (C); diabetic sedentary group(DS); and diabetic trained group (DT). Data are expressed as mean ± standarderror of the mean. The statistical differences were determined by repeatedmeasures analysis of variance followed by Bonferroni post-test. ***p < 0.001 vs. C 0; †† p < 0.01 vs. DS 0; and # p< 0.05 vs. DT 0.
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f01: Variation of blood glucose levels of rats at the beginning (0) and by the end(8) of eight weeks of training: control group (C); diabetic sedentary group(DS); and diabetic trained group (DT). Data are expressed as mean ± standarderror of the mean. The statistical differences were determined by repeatedmeasures analysis of variance followed by Bonferroni post-test. ***p < 0.001 vs. C 0; †† p < 0.01 vs. DS 0; and # p< 0.05 vs. DT 0.

Mentions: Figure 1 shows the effect of resistanceexercise on blood glucose levels. Alloxan induced an increase (p < 0.001) in bloodglucose concentration in both experimental groups. In addition, resistance exercisecaused a reduction (p < 0.05) in blood glucose levels after eight weeks (Figure 1).


Resistance exercise restores endothelial function and reduces blood pressure in type 1 diabetic rats.

Mota MM, Silva TL, Fontes MT, Barreto AS, Araújo JE, Oliveira AC, Wichi RB, Santos MR - Arq. Bras. Cardiol. (2014)

Variation of blood glucose levels of rats at the beginning (0) and by the end(8) of eight weeks of training: control group (C); diabetic sedentary group(DS); and diabetic trained group (DT). Data are expressed as mean ± standarderror of the mean. The statistical differences were determined by repeatedmeasures analysis of variance followed by Bonferroni post-test. ***p < 0.001 vs. C 0; †† p < 0.01 vs. DS 0; and # p< 0.05 vs. DT 0.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4126758&req=5

f01: Variation of blood glucose levels of rats at the beginning (0) and by the end(8) of eight weeks of training: control group (C); diabetic sedentary group(DS); and diabetic trained group (DT). Data are expressed as mean ± standarderror of the mean. The statistical differences were determined by repeatedmeasures analysis of variance followed by Bonferroni post-test. ***p < 0.001 vs. C 0; †† p < 0.01 vs. DS 0; and # p< 0.05 vs. DT 0.
Mentions: Figure 1 shows the effect of resistanceexercise on blood glucose levels. Alloxan induced an increase (p < 0.001) in bloodglucose concentration in both experimental groups. In addition, resistance exercisecaused a reduction (p < 0.05) in blood glucose levels after eight weeks (Figure 1).

Bottom Line: A significant reduction in the maximum response of acetylcholine-induced relaxation was observed in the sedentary diabetic group (78.1 ± 2%) and an increase in the trained diabetic group (95 ± 3%) without changing potency.In the presence of NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, the acetylcholine-induced relaxation was significantly reduced in the control and trained diabetic groups, but not in the sedentary diabetic group.However, the trained diabetic group showed a significant decrease (p < 0.05) in the mean arterial blood pressure levels (126.7 ± 5 to 105.1 ± 4 mmHg) as compared to the sedentary diabetic group.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Departamento de Fisiologia, Universidade Federal de Sergipe, São Cristóvão, SE, Brazil.

ABSTRACT

Background: Resistance exercise effects on cardiovascular parameters are not consistent.

Objectives: The effects of resistance exercise on changes in blood glucose, blood pressure and vascular reactivity were evaluated in diabetic rats.

Methods: Wistar rats were divided into three groups: control group (n = 8); sedentary diabetic (n = 8); and trained diabetic (n = 8). Resistance exercise was carried out in a squat device for rats and consisted of three sets of ten repetitions with an intensity of 50%, three times per week, for eight weeks. Changes in vascular reactivity were evaluated in superior mesenteric artery rings.

Results: A significant reduction in the maximum response of acetylcholine-induced relaxation was observed in the sedentary diabetic group (78.1 ± 2%) and an increase in the trained diabetic group (95 ± 3%) without changing potency. In the presence of NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, the acetylcholine-induced relaxation was significantly reduced in the control and trained diabetic groups, but not in the sedentary diabetic group. Furthermore, a significant increase (p < 0.05) in mean arterial blood pressure was observed in the sedentary diabetic group (104.9 ± 5 to 126.7 ± 5 mmHg) as compared to that in the control group. However, the trained diabetic group showed a significant decrease (p < 0.05) in the mean arterial blood pressure levels (126.7 ± 5 to 105.1 ± 4 mmHg) as compared to the sedentary diabetic group.

Conclusions: Resistance exercise could restore endothelial function and prevent an increase in arterial blood pressure in type 1 diabetic rats.

Show MeSH