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Visceral adiposity index may be a surrogate marker for the assessment of the effects of obesity on arterial stiffness.

Yang F, Wang G, Wang Z, Sun M, Cao M, Zhu Z, Fu Q, Mao J, Shi Y, Yang T - PLoS ONE (2014)

Bottom Line: The multivariate regression analysis revealed a negative but weak effect of BMI (β = -0.047, P<0.001) on baPWV, but failed to demonstrate any significant effect of WC on baPWV while VAI was a positive independent indicator of baPWV (β = 0.023, P = 0.022).Although the positive association was lost after adjustments for confounding factors in the BMI or WC categories (P>0.05), it was still obtained between baPWV and VAI quartile (P<0.01).However, baPWV significantly increased across groups with higher VAI categories even in the same metabolic category (P<0.01).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Endocrinology, First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu, China.

ABSTRACT

Objective: The relationship between obesity and cardiovascular disease (CVD) remains unclear. This study aims to describe the relationship between arterial stiffness and obesity in order to investigate the effects of obesity on CVD.

Methods: We collected data from 5,158 individuals over 40 years of age from a cross-sectional study in Nanjing, China. Anthropometric, demographic, hemodynamic measurements and arterial stiffness measured through brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) were obtained. Subjects were grouped by body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC) and visceral adiposity index (VAI), a sex-specific index based on BMI, WC, triglyceride (TG) and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C).

Results: The multivariate regression analysis revealed a negative but weak effect of BMI (β = -0.047, P<0.001) on baPWV, but failed to demonstrate any significant effect of WC on baPWV while VAI was a positive independent indicator of baPWV (β = 0.023, P = 0.022). The unadjusted baPWV significantly increased across groups with higher obesity categories (P<0.01). Although the positive association was lost after adjustments for confounding factors in the BMI or WC categories (P>0.05), it was still obtained between baPWV and VAI quartile (P<0.01). No differences were observed among the metabolically healthy groups or the metabolically abnormal groups in the BMI and WC categories (P>0.05). However, baPWV significantly increased across groups with higher VAI categories even in the same metabolic category (P<0.01).

Conclusions: This study supports the concept of heterogeneity of metabolic status among individuals within the same obesity range. Obese individuals are at an increased risk of arterial stiffness regardless of their metabolic conditions. VAI may be a surrogate marker for the assessment of obesity and the effects of obesity on arterial stiffness.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Matsuda ISI (mean ± s.e.) and HOMA-IR (mean ± s.e.) according to visceral adiposity index quartiles after adjustments for sex and age.* P<0.001 for the comparison to the first quartile. Matsuda ISI, Matsuda Insulin Sensitivity Index; HOMA-IR, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance.
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pone-0104365-g003: Matsuda ISI (mean ± s.e.) and HOMA-IR (mean ± s.e.) according to visceral adiposity index quartiles after adjustments for sex and age.* P<0.001 for the comparison to the first quartile. Matsuda ISI, Matsuda Insulin Sensitivity Index; HOMA-IR, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance.

Mentions: The associations between HOMA-IR, Matsuda ISI and VAI category are depicted in Figure 3. Individuals with a higher VAI category had lower insulin sensitivity (Fig 3a; P<0.001) and greater insulin resistance (Fig 3b; P<0.001). Furthermore, SBP and DBP were significantly elevated with increasing VAI category (P<0.001) (data not shown).


Visceral adiposity index may be a surrogate marker for the assessment of the effects of obesity on arterial stiffness.

Yang F, Wang G, Wang Z, Sun M, Cao M, Zhu Z, Fu Q, Mao J, Shi Y, Yang T - PLoS ONE (2014)

Matsuda ISI (mean ± s.e.) and HOMA-IR (mean ± s.e.) according to visceral adiposity index quartiles after adjustments for sex and age.* P<0.001 for the comparison to the first quartile. Matsuda ISI, Matsuda Insulin Sensitivity Index; HOMA-IR, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4126713&req=5

pone-0104365-g003: Matsuda ISI (mean ± s.e.) and HOMA-IR (mean ± s.e.) according to visceral adiposity index quartiles after adjustments for sex and age.* P<0.001 for the comparison to the first quartile. Matsuda ISI, Matsuda Insulin Sensitivity Index; HOMA-IR, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance.
Mentions: The associations between HOMA-IR, Matsuda ISI and VAI category are depicted in Figure 3. Individuals with a higher VAI category had lower insulin sensitivity (Fig 3a; P<0.001) and greater insulin resistance (Fig 3b; P<0.001). Furthermore, SBP and DBP were significantly elevated with increasing VAI category (P<0.001) (data not shown).

Bottom Line: The multivariate regression analysis revealed a negative but weak effect of BMI (β = -0.047, P<0.001) on baPWV, but failed to demonstrate any significant effect of WC on baPWV while VAI was a positive independent indicator of baPWV (β = 0.023, P = 0.022).Although the positive association was lost after adjustments for confounding factors in the BMI or WC categories (P>0.05), it was still obtained between baPWV and VAI quartile (P<0.01).However, baPWV significantly increased across groups with higher VAI categories even in the same metabolic category (P<0.01).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Endocrinology, First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu, China.

ABSTRACT

Objective: The relationship between obesity and cardiovascular disease (CVD) remains unclear. This study aims to describe the relationship between arterial stiffness and obesity in order to investigate the effects of obesity on CVD.

Methods: We collected data from 5,158 individuals over 40 years of age from a cross-sectional study in Nanjing, China. Anthropometric, demographic, hemodynamic measurements and arterial stiffness measured through brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) were obtained. Subjects were grouped by body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC) and visceral adiposity index (VAI), a sex-specific index based on BMI, WC, triglyceride (TG) and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C).

Results: The multivariate regression analysis revealed a negative but weak effect of BMI (β = -0.047, P<0.001) on baPWV, but failed to demonstrate any significant effect of WC on baPWV while VAI was a positive independent indicator of baPWV (β = 0.023, P = 0.022). The unadjusted baPWV significantly increased across groups with higher obesity categories (P<0.01). Although the positive association was lost after adjustments for confounding factors in the BMI or WC categories (P>0.05), it was still obtained between baPWV and VAI quartile (P<0.01). No differences were observed among the metabolically healthy groups or the metabolically abnormal groups in the BMI and WC categories (P>0.05). However, baPWV significantly increased across groups with higher VAI categories even in the same metabolic category (P<0.01).

Conclusions: This study supports the concept of heterogeneity of metabolic status among individuals within the same obesity range. Obese individuals are at an increased risk of arterial stiffness regardless of their metabolic conditions. VAI may be a surrogate marker for the assessment of obesity and the effects of obesity on arterial stiffness.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus